Jeep Enthusiast Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my buddy just got a new 392 and has already yarded off the suspension setup in favor of something better suited for his larger tires.

He’s basically giving me his stock setup….. I’m having a hard time finding any info on this setup and if its even something that can be swapped over or worth it.

Currently I have a 2021 Unlimited Rubicon (just purchased 2 months ago)
*waiting my 35” Baja boss tires to show up so I’m looking for suspension account for this change in tires. Originally planned on doing something in the spring until these fell in my lap.
*use my jeep for camping, hunting, and mild off road exploring

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,952 Posts
It will fit and this is why.

You have a regular Rubicon. It comes with higher fenders and the axles are 1.5” wider than other JL models. Your OEM tire is 285/70-17 which is approximately 33” tall and 11.2” wide. Tires are inevitably smaller than their advertised size and some brands are worse than others for that. BFG is a lot smaller than advertised than many other brands are.

You can run 35’s on a stock Rubicon. I think at full flex there is some minor rubbing, particularly if you are using stock wheels.

The suspension from your buddy’s 392 Rubicon will give your regular Rubicon a small amount of lift. Since it is free, then why not do it. If you had to buy it, then probably not worth it.

All of this is based on the assumption you are going with 315/70-17 or 35x12.5r17 tires. If you are going with tires that are 11.5” wide instead, then you have more clearance and you can reuse your easily reuse your stock wheels.

If you are going with 12.5” wide tires (315mm), then you are going to want wheels that are wider. 9” is good, but plus or minus half an inch is ok as well. You also need to think about things like offset / backspacing.

Running a 12.5” tire can be done using spacers to get the proper backspacing, but the wheels are narrower than they should be which causes crowning, or curvature of the tread, which is less than ideal.

After you install your buddy’s lift on your Jeep, check the caster.

It’s probably a longer answer than you wanted.

I don’t currently own a JL, but my JKU is about to hit 100,000 miles so I have been paying a lot of attention to JL’s. The prices scare the hell out of me.


I forgot to add that if you have a diesel, that’s different because of the location of the DEF tank and a few other diesel specific things.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top