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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to do a tranny filter change on the 2012 KK with 80k miles. I want to do a fluid exchange after that. I hook a clear tube to the return line and pump the old fluid out until it runs clean. On my XJ the return line was obvious. This KK not so much. Anyone know which line is which?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It is my Daughter's car and if you have Daughters you know that you have to make an appointment to do anything on it. As it is I am giving her my car so I can work on hers but I want to go at this as prepared as I can.I don't even know how the lines are connected. Quick releases? Nuts? Best place to open the lines?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I eyeballed it today. You can't even see where the lines bolt to the radiator. But the hard lines meet the flexible lines down at the bottom and are secured with the quick-connects. That looks promising so I will see about getting the connections apart without breaking them. There is a special tool for this (of course) but I read that a pick tool will get the spring off. Just don't lose it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well here is the factory tool to use on the "Jiffy-tite". That's what the quick connect actually is. It is very expensive so I ordered the Lisle long version. The lines are 3/8" but very close together. I don't see enough room for the round tool getting the fitting open. The long tool has a smaller head and there is plenty of room to swing it down there. The good thing is that whatever line I get open, the oil will drain straight down.. Hopefully I will find the right hard line so a plastic tube can go right on.Making progress!...................................................................................
 

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FYI, its not a good idea to flush the fluid as part of routine maintenance. Jeep doesn't recommend it nor does most transmission shops for street transmissions. A flush is going to flush out all the friction material suspended in the oil, which is hard on the clutches and reduces their life. Suspended friction material is good, worn oil is not. A drain the pan, replace the filter, and fill with fresh fluid leaves enough friction material in there and provides enough fresh oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have been flushing the ATF on my '00 XJ for many years. It has always ran better after that. I like to do it about every 50k before it gets too dark. I have never heard of dirty oil being better but I have seen engines and transmissions that were so neglected that changing the oil caused problems. But I try to not get to that point.
 

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Its not dirty, its friction material. But then if you are water fording or a mud bogger, you could get some contaminants in there.

Just saying every transmission specialist I know as well as Jeep does not recommend flushing the modern transmission that uses synthetic fluids. Flushing is old school, from the days when it was easy to burn up oil. We have learned that flushing has been proven to do more harm than good as far as transmission life.

Not a big deal, do what you are comfortable with. If you are looking for the longest life from that KK transmission, don't flush. Just drain and fill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Maybe I should not use the word "flush" which indicates using a solvent to clean out the system. It is actually a fluid exchange and stealerships here do it without changing the filter. As for the clutch material floating around in there I was once stranded 100 miles from home because the filter got clogged with that stuff. Since then I am serious about not going past 50k without changing filters. Fresh fluid just seems like a no-brainer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
OK I figured out what is what. In this drawing the #3 and #2 lines are the return lines. So looking at it from underneath you want to open the passenger side fitting. I tried to use the tool to get the "Jiffy-tite" thingy open. Naming it "Jiffy" is particularly cruel. The line and fitting were so corroded that I ended up using the pick to pry the little spring clip out. DON"T LOSE IT! Then I had to use a wrench to turn the hose end while pulling to get it off. NOT EASY!!! I'm sure it went right together smartly at the factory and if you went to open it the next day it would come apart like butter. But add eight years of weather and road crud/salt and you have a nightmare on your hands. I cleaned it as best I could but I will be praying it doesn't leak later. Also the RTV sealer they used for a pan gasket is another joke. It was leaking all over and several of the bolts were hardly even finger tight. Spend the $4 and get a real gasket. Then schmear both sides with Permatex Ultra Black. It won't leak any more- trust me. The oil pan was almost rusted through at several spots. Good old Mopar-Metal. I sealed it with some epoxy paint for now. It's not that expensive but I am in a hurry and can't wait for it to ship. No one has it near me.
Font Parallel Auto part Rectangle Slope
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All done. Judging by the condition of the pan I believe that it would have rotted through and leaked oil probably at the worst possible time. So much for "lifetime" fluid when the pan rots before the oil gets changed. The "Jiffy-tite" went back together OK but I tried using the tool to get it apart again and it was a waste of time. Just useless. Here is another tip- dig out your torque wrench for the pan bolts. I used a FelPro gasket and I schmeared both surfaces with Ultra Black. Using a nut driver I replaced all the bolts hand-tight. What I thought was tight enough was nowhere near the proper torque of 12 inch pounds. Use the torque wrench and go around and around sneaking up on the final torque. 12 inch pounds will not distort the gasket and squish it out. I also put a dab of Loktite blue on each bolt seeing as so many had vibrated loose. Don't forget that the second bolt from the front on the driver side gets sealer. It is right under the pressure test taps. Only a single YouTube video out of many knew about that. I hooked a clear 3/8" hose to the steel return line and ran that into a big clear jug. Run the other hose into a pan too as it WILL drain fluid. I used some 3/4" heater hose. Once that was done I filled the pan with a gallon of Mopar ATF+4 and ran the engine so that the old fluid came out. Shut it off and refill. Run again. Keep doing this until nice red fluid comes out. Then let the lines drain and when empty you can re-connect them. The "Jiffy-tite" snapped right back together and did not leak. Then it was time to slowly fill the pan a pint at a time so that you sneak up on the proper fill depth. You use the dipstick tool and factory chart to see that at 70° the level is 20mm. Once you get to that level you can go for a ride to get the fluid good and hot. It came back and I checked the pan with an infra-red temp scan tool. It showed 171° and if you add 5 degrees for the internal temp that is very close to the ideal 180° the FSM calls for. Then you adjust the fluid level to 44mm for the target level. Then you get it back on the road for a test drive and re-check the level. Too much is worse than too little. . It ran great and I am confidant knowing the filter and fluid are fresh as well as the pan is now rust-proofed.
 

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Thanks so much for all the info. I need to do this in the next six months at 60k miles along with replacing all the fluids in the vehicle. The only thing I didn't replace at 30K miles was the transmission fluid but that will get done this time around. Will be putting on a new pan and replacing the rusty bolts also. An honest transmission shop owner once told me not to go more than around 50k miles without a fluid change. He said the 100k changes were a bad idea based on what he has seen. I was going to pay him to change all the fluid and filter but I'm having the confidence after reading this to do it myself. As long as I can get nearly all the fluid changed. This is the first time I ever heard that only part of the old fluid should be changed. Old fluid protecting better than new fluid, that doesn't make sense.
 

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I did a little reading. It's recommended that the fluid should be changed every 50-60k miles or less. If you let it go longer than it is a bad idea to change it otherwise problems may surface. Basically you want to change your fluid when it's still fairly clean. The auto manufacturers are misleading us when they say the fluid is a lifetime product. I've always been skeptical of those maintenance schedules.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well the fluid was not too bad considering the mileage (80k). The filter was not clogged either. Aside from the very dark color (which the FSM says is "normal" I am glad it was changed before stuff went bad. I have seen neglected filters disable the car and require a tow. You just feel better knowing the filter and fluid are fresh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No, I scored the last Mopar filter in the known universe. If I had to choose an aftermarket I would go with AC Delco, WIX, Hastings, or ATP. ATP has been very good with trans parts like filters and gaskets in my other cars.
 

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As soon as I get all the materials together I'll be doing a full fluid exchange like you did. Any advise will be much appreciated. Will be replacing the filter and pan. Sounds like the special tool was a waste of time and money.



What did you use for atf+4? Some quality stuff in a 5gal would be nice then I can get a couple changes out of it plus have some left for various other things. Not wanting the cheapest or most expensive stuff. Quality and mid price range is usually what I look for.
 

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Mopar websites say these fit 2003-2012 Jeep Liberty. They also are the same numbers in my 2011 manual except for the updated filter part number.


Pan 52852912AC
Filter 68059549AA replaces 52852913AB
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I used the actual NOPAR brand fluid. I managed to get six gallons pretty cheap from a friend with an account at NAPA. I bought too much figuring it may take longer than anticipated to see cherry red fluid appear. The clear hose is key. You will know when it is fresh fluid coming out. Yeah, I use old ATF for other things too. Like adding a quart to my motor oil right before I change it. I let those detergents do some internal cleaning since I am draining it anyway. Also: while under the 2012 KK I noticed some big rusty blisters on the engine oil pan. I guess crappy cheap metal is NO-PAR-for-the-course. Sad.
 

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I have not been able to find what I want in a bulk container; only by the quart. Apparently not very many people are changing their own fluid and in need of a lot of it. Napa is made by Valvoline and rumors say Mopar is also made by Valvoline.

Mopar $13.50 dealership
Mopar at least $11 internet shopping depending on how many quarts you buy
Napa $4.69
Valvoline $4.97 Menards or $4.42 with current rebate

Looks like I'll go with the Valvoline from Menards this time around for the best price.

I bought a Dorman 265-818 pan. Reviews said it was a better pan than the factory original. It also has a drain plug. Reviews said the copper drain plug washer is troublesome and it was recommended to get a good replacement washer.

I'm working outside in below freezing temps this time around so needed to figure out a solution to get around the curing of rtv. I stopped using gaskets years ago since they are so troublesome. I ended up buying a Lubelocker gasket for the 42RLE transmission since it appears to be one of highest quality gaskets you can get. I hope that pans out. If it actually works properly it should be a much easier job in the future.

Got the Mopar filter.

Also bought twelve M8-1.25 16mm long stainless steel flange head bolts to replace the rusted factory ones. Torque is pretty low for holding a pan so they should be fine.
 
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