Jeep Enthusiast Forums banner
61 - 77 of 77 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
I dumped the QT installed a twin stick NP 205 with indent removed so i now have a true 4 wheel drive. I welded the front spiders installed a locker rear end. On bad weather days I lock the front axle, Place the front axle in neural and rear in what ever the condition's call for. When 4 wheel drive is needed i just shift the front end in and away i go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
pigphish said:
any tips for manual tranny's.

I tried doing this with my jeep when i was in some dirt with some spinning wheels but it was too easy to stall trying to negotiate all three peddles.
You will have to learn something called "heel-toe". An old- fashioned method of driving where you apply pressure to both the gas and brake at the same time (but with different pressure by rocking your foot left and right) with your right foot, freeing up your left foot for the clutch. Older cars from the 50's and 60's had a big long gas peddle (for the heel of your foot) and a wide brake (for your toe). In today's vehicles, you pretty much position the ball of your foot on both peddles. This is how you begin moving after stopped uphill, rather than the rev-like- hell method I see some dopey kids use. Hope that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
My father was the one who taught me how to heel toe when I first started driving and it has stuck with me since; however, I was never able to do it same way he does (which I believe is the technique most people follow). The way that he taught me is what I believe to be the traditional way of heel toeing which is to pivot your foot over from the brake so that your foot is somewhat horizontal with the heelside of your foot controlling the throttle. I've always found this uncomfortable and have always used the outer edge of my foot to control the throttle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Forgive my ignorance, I have been reading and watching videos but when you go to a two piece front axle or have a posi lok and your front shaft always spins why/how is it spinning and not engaging 4WD? What is it in your TC that sends the torque to the front wheels when you pull the TC lever? Is it simply thrusting the spinning shaft forward to engage the axle shafts? :brickwall
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,802 Posts
Thanks for posting, re posting and answering questions Jerry :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Interesting read....

Why hasn't a spool been mentioned here once???
If a guy is strictly off-road, why not save some money and buy a spool? I remember as a kid, a bunch of guys welding spiders...I can't imagine the long term effects...I take it back, yes I can! ;)

A spool is little over $100 for a D30 or 35, and replaces the spiders. Lockers for same can be as much as $700.

Curious....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Interesting read....

Why hasn't a spool been mentioned here once???
If a guy is strictly off-road, why not save some money and buy a spool? I remember as a kid, a bunch of guys welding spiders...I can't imagine the long term effects...I take it back, yes I can! ;)

A spool is little over $100 for a D30 or 35, and replaces the spiders. Lockers for same can be as much as $700.

Curious....
Straight line racing is perfect for a spool. Turning, however small, is not. Can't say why no one else mentioned it, but it may be an appreciation of the potential for a disaster???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Straight line racing is perfect for a spool. Turning, however small, is not. Can't say why no one else mentioned it, but it may be an appreciation of the potential for a disaster???
Maybe not in the front?

As I said earlier, I remember guys welding spiders, not something I would recommend, I just never remember what they learned from that...maybe don't weld spiders? :grin2:
 

·
Retired
Joined
·
72,528 Posts
Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Straight line racing is perfect for a spool. Turning, however small, is not. Can't say why no one else mentioned it, but it may be an appreciation of the potential for a disaster???
Spools are not the "potential for a disaster" you may believe they are. They are actually very benign and totally predictable. I have a friend who just installed a spool and other than the symphony of tire squealing and tire chirps it does fine on the street. Not great but neither is it anything to worry about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Spools are not the "potential for a disaster" you may believe they are. They are actually very benign and totally predictable. I have a friend who just installed a spool and other than the symphony of tire squealing and tire chirps it does fine on the street. Not great but neither is it anything to worry about.
Thanks Jerry. I'm sure the chirping and tire wear is livable although I much prefer the ratcheting of a locker to tire wear, but how does a spool behave offroad??? I'd expect bad manners in rocks and timber?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Thanks Jerry. I'm sure the chirping and tire wear is livable although I much prefer the ratcheting of a locker to tire wear, but how does a spool behave offroad??? I'd expect bad manners in rocks and timber?
Solid Lock-Up, the tires absolutely can Not turn at different speeds.

I would guess for a street rig, it would be horrible in the ice and snow (I've hit "curbs" a LOT, in a locked rear rig).

It's probably the One thing stronger than a Detroit Locker, if you buy quality.
 
61 - 77 of 77 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top