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83 cj7
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The tit that holds the ujoint cap in place is just completely gone. Kinda odd how it's notched pretty cleanly. You can see why it threw the joint. Time for a new one I guess.


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1974 Jeep CJ-6
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End of the cross bound up against the tit after it spit out the cap, shaft went around and it pushed the cross into the tit and broke it off. Can't tell real well, but did the yoke crack between the bolt hole and where the tit was? May just be extra material from the strap, can't tell, but the yoke needs replaced anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
End of the cross bound up against the tit after it spit out the cap, shaft went around and it pushed the cross into the tit and broke it off. Can't tell real well, but did the yoke crack between the bolt hole and where the tit was?
It's too hard to get under there with one working arm so I can't go look, but I bet you're right. It sure looks cracked. It's weird it knocked out a perfectly square chunk.almost like the tit is separate from the yoke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Looks like it rose to the temperature of the center of the Sun on the yoke surface.

How long did it scream or vibrate like crazy before you discovered it?

------JEEPFELLER
Bout 30 seconds.

If I have to change the crush sleeve and drain the diff anyway I might as well amass parts to do the rear gears anyway. I'll think about it.
 

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Bout 30 seconds.

If I have to change the crush sleeve and drain the diff anyway I might as well amass parts to do the rear gears anyway. I'll think about it.
You can mark the pinion nut to the shaft, count rotations when you take the nut off and put it back together without changing the crush sleeve.
 

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You can mark the pinion nut to the shaft, count rotations when you take the nut off and put it back together without changing the crush sleeve.
This is true if the same has not been done before. I will add to it that you need to remove the rear brakes and measure the preload of the entire rotating mass in inch pounds with a dial or flex type wrench. You then increase the preload by 3 to 5 inch pounds to make sure that you regained crush on the sleeve but did not over tighten the preload on the bearings. Marking the nut and shaft is not reliable when you are installing a new part such as a yoke. They are not guaranteed to be the exact same dimensionally. Stuff is manufactured to tolerances. Also. Many yokes come as a kit with a new washer and nut.

In all due respect fourtrail. Your method works well if using all the same parts and only changing a pinion seal. Even then though, you need to tighten the nut about a 32 to 16th of an inch past where it was to regain crush on the sleeve. I work on mail trucks and do this job sometimes almost daily as I do my own but also am the "diff guy" in the shop due to the fact that we have had several comebacks on this and I am very formally trained in this and very successful at it so I oversee most of the others repairs in this regard per our manager and shop foreman.
 
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