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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am seeing mixed information on what and what not to weld to, how and how not to weld, etc. I am doing the tie rod flip for my CJ narrow track Dana 30. I went the cheaper route, which may or may not be good/okay, and it's the particular kit that involves drilling out the TRE hole to 3/4" and placing the bushing inside, then welding it. The Dana 30 knuckles are cast iron, correct? Is there are special preheat process I should know about? I want to be as careful as possible, and so far I have seen mixed input saying to not weld to steering knuckles at all as well as welding to them is just fine, so long as you follow a "process". TIA
 

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Is it the Goferit kit? When I did mine, I used Permatex's Sleeve Retainer, it's used to seal and retain diesel cylinder sleeves in the block. I generously applied the sealer between the insert and knuckle, let it cure over night. Put in the tierod ends in an torqued them down to the required specs, been over 2 years now.
 

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on a our JK knuckle did the same for a drag link flip. But the sleeve did not need welding. just a straight hole through the factor tapper. sleeve expands as the tres is tightened into the sleeves tapper. like near ten years on it and very hard use. Its even been off and back on at times .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply yall. This particular project is severely time sensitive. The kit is the goferit kit. See the attached pictures. I got my bungs TIG welded to the thick wall tubing, both the new tie rod and drag link, and installed the new Moog TREs with proper jam nuts. No issues with deformed threads whatsoever, and I applied a liberal amount of anti-sieze. The last part is painting of course, but that's easy. The thing I am confused about is in fact the tie rod flip kit. I don't understand how you could get away without welding them to the knuckle. The OD of the bushing is 3/4". The OD of the nut is 3/4". If you don't weld the bushing to the knuckle, then what keeps the whole TRE, bushing, and nut from coming out of the newly drilled 3/4" hole in the knuckle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I suppose I already solved my problem...the kit I bought came with standard 1/2-20 (3/4" OD) castle nuts and cotter pins. The actual Goferit kit uses the special spiral lock flanged nut. It is the flange on the nut that is larger in diameter than 3/4", thus retaining the TRE to the knuckle and keeping it from coming out. Now I just have to find where to buy the flanged fine thread nuts...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Got the holes drilled today. Used an old, resharpened 3/4" bit and it cut super slow, so I bought a new DeWalt and it actually cut a little over 3/4" so when I put the bushings in, they had *slight* side to side play. I saw the idea of sleeve seal, but couldnt get any, so I used 3900 psi clear 1:1 J-B weld epoxy and coated it real nice, pushed them in, and let it cure. I was also able to get the 1/2-20 serrated nuts I needed so thats good. Final question, do you think the epoxy will be strong enough? I made sure I did a good job mixing, etc. I was going to finish it off by welding the flange to the knuckle, but I dont want to buy the special rod and go through the preheat process just for something to become weaker and potentially cracked, not to mention it would likely melt the cured epoxy. Do you think this is smart and the epoxy will be strong enough?
 

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The 3900psi is its tensile strength, there is no data on its compressive strength or fatigue performance.

I would be happy to have it in there, and then inspect it until I was sure it was not breaking up and allowing play. If it is only subject to compression load, and no prying or shear forces, it could be OK as a gap filler.
 

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The 3900psi is its tensile strength, there is no data on its compressive strength or fatigue performance.

I would be happy to have it in there, and then inspect it until I was sure it was not breaking up and allowing play. If it is only subject to compression load, and no prying or shear forces, it could be OK as a gap filler.
Devon Plastic Steel putty 10110 has a high metallic content and a compressive strength rating around 8200 psi. It's tough stuff. The navy base I worked at had a marine section and they used it for various repairs where welding or brazing couldn't be done.

Edit: For something like what you did, it would have been better to drill slightly undersize then ream to final dimension.
 

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I don't remember where I bought my insert kit (online somewhere) from but I have done the tie rod flip and I did weld my inserts in just using a 110 volt lincoln wire feed welder using core flux wire. I used the heavy duty Rugged Ridge tie rod and drag link also. That was all done about 4-ish plus years ago. I have now put several thousand miles on that project and just had it all apart a couple weeks ago to replace wheel bearings/cups, spindle maintenance, u-joints and ball joint replacement. I inspected each bushing I welded in and all looked like the day I installed them, no visible issues.

They involved the same process drilling out the holes and mine were a snug fit. Each bushing is tapered and had a lip around the top. I welded the lip to the knuckle arms per instructions. They stated the weld did not have to even be all the way around but I did anyway. These inserts installed had left an little sticking out the bottom that had to be ground flush with the knuckle arm surface. I think this kit included new locking nuts as well and they recommended using theirs and also ok'd using some blue locktight as well. Haven't had any issues and they welded in nicely. I'm no expert welder, so they are not the prettiest welds you ever seen, but they were good welds and had lasted fine. I haven't done any serious off roading, so there is that if that means anything. But just thought I'd share my personal experience with this. Again, I am no expert welder. I am however not a total stranger to welding.

Everyone has to make their own decisions when it comes to critical points like this. You have to go with what you're comfortable with. Not saying you should do it either way, just sharing.
 

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Just hit it with the MIG, the main reason to weld the insert in is so it doesn't spin in the steering arm when it comes time to remove the eventually worn out tie rod ends.
 

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How does the stud from the tie rod end have enough length to reach the castle nut slot for the cotter pin with the shoulder on the insert?
 

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How does the stud from the tie rod end have enough length to reach the castle nut slot for the cotter pin with the shoulder on the insert?
it doesn't, that is why the kit from go-fer-it comes with new spiral lock flange nuts.

 
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