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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy. Upgrading my 00 TJ to replace D35 with D 44 (non rubi) rear end. Running 33's now and I street drive a fair amount in the summer. Jeep is in storage for winter so never in snow unless late season wheeling. I've read so many great posts here, and those have helped my research a lot. I've pretty much decided on eaton e locker for front stock D30. now in a twist between detroit locker or true tac for rear. In NH, i wheel old town roads mostly, no mud. out west i wheel around the san juans, and also going to moab this spring. I prefer to pick a nice clean line versus throw iron and rpm at it.

Some of my bronco buddies swear by the true trac and have noticed detroits tend to push a rig in a straight line. the two i wheel with both have true tracs and dont seem to have issues with a tire in the air, but that is also east coast wheeling with maybe Rausch Creek being the most they see.

thoughts on TT versus Detroit?

thanks

Hank
 

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A Truetrac is nothing more than a limited slip differential and they are useless on any trail that is uneven enough to lift one of the tires up even slightly off the surface. Nope, stepping on the brakes or pulling the parking brake handle doesn't help enough in that situation. They are best on flat surfaces that are covered with ice, snow, or mud.

If you are wanting this more for offroad use where the trails are uneven you want a true locker. 20+ years ago I had front and rear Truetracs and they were useless on the trails I enjoyed, I replaced both with true lockers.

A rear locker can tend to push a rig straight ahead but not as bad as some claim. I wheeled happily for many years with a Detroit Locker in the rear and a Powertrax No-Slip lunchbox locker up front and all of my trails are tight-twisty trails.

If you can afford it, consider an Eaton E-Locker in the rear. That's a selectable locker you can turn on & off with a switch. I'm now running f/r selectable lockers and they work great. But I wouldn't hate it if for some weird reason I had to go back to my previous Detroit Locker in the future.
 

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Running 33's now and I street drive a fair amount in the summer. Jeep is in storage for winter so never in snow unless late season wheeling.
Are you sticking with 33s? If so, the economy choice would be a Powertrax No Slip up front, and open rear. That will give you plenty of offroad capability, and save a small fortune.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A Truetrac is nothing more than a limited slip differential and they are useless on any trail that is uneven enough to lift one of the tires up even slightly off the surface. Nope, stepping on the brakes or pulling the parking brake handle doesn't help enough in that situation. They are best on flat surfaces that are covered with ice, snow, or mud.

If you are wanting this more for offroad use where the trails are uneven you want a true locker. 20+ years ago I had front and rear Truetracs and they were useless on the trails I enjoyed, I replaced both with true lockers.

A rear locker can tend to push a rig straight ahead but not as bad as some claim. I wheeled happily for many years with a Detroit Locker in the rear and a Powertrax No-Slip lunchbox locker up front and all of my trails are tight-twisty trails.

If you can afford it, consider an Eaton E-Locker in the rear. That's a selectable locker you can turn on & off with a switch. I'm now running f/r selectable lockers and they work great. But I wouldn't hate it if for some weird reason I had to go back to my previous Detroit Locker in the future.

Hi Jerry. i think ive read every post you wrote over the past ten years or so when searching this subject and your counsel is consistent. thx

i like the idea of not having e locker in the rear for risk avoidance i guess. something electrical happens with the unit and i might be stuck. less risk in the front in the same case in my eyes.

im going to go with e locker in the front im thinking but still on the fence vs no-slip / aussie for the front.

im regearing to 4.56 as part of this and keeping 33's at least through this set of tires.

i think im pulling the trigger on detroit for the rear.

thx

Hank
 

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The only real difference in the Aussie and No-Slip for the front is the Aussie clicks/ratchets through turns which can get you attention from those who will try to tell you there's a problem in the front axle. The No-Slip is silent. You'll like the Eaton E-Locker in the rear, even John Currie runs that locker now.
 

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If you hav'nt bought your lockers yet, I ran a Detroit in the rear for years. Other than the occasional 'unload' that happens from time to time, (which is not a big deal) it performed flawlessly. I had a No-slip in the front. It too was flawless, but I did not like it being full time. To do it over again, I would absolutely put a selectable up front. I also like the E-lockers. If you are doing both F & R and want to save a buck, you could throw a Detroit in the rear instead of a selectable. That combo IMHO would work well and would let you do the majority of trails in Moab. (y)
 

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i like the idea of not having e locker in the rear for risk avoidance i guess. something electrical happens with the unit and i might be stuck. less risk in the front in the same case in my eyes.

im going to go with e locker in the front im thinking but still on the fence vs no-slip / aussie for the front.
I just re-read your post. If you're going to have one selectable it's best placed in the rear. Yes that may seem counter-intuitive but being able to turn the rear locker off helps making tight turns a LOT easier than turning the front locker off. John Currie even made a great video showing the difference between unlocking the rear vs. front locker in how tight of a turn can be made. It's on Youtube.
 

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My YJ has a detroit in the rear in a Ford 8.8. I wanted the best locker I could get for less than selectable money, and I prefer the simplicity of automatic operation. That said, it does take some getting used to on the street but is not a big deal. I basically coast around tight corners, or at least keep a consistent speed, and it's fine. Going uphill around a corner is different, as it locks up. The Jeep has turned into more of a cruiser in recent years and part of me wishes I had a true trac since it's mostly on the street. But once it goes offroad, very satisfying.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
howdy. thanks for the follow ups. i have a detroit in hand for the rear and a no slip for the front and 4.56 gears. i wanted the e locker for the front but couldn't find one. if i find one in the next weeks i might still go that way. im heading west to ski for a couple weeks but jumping on the build as soon as i get back. ive got about 5 weeks to get it all done including r&r the front axle and install new to me D44 in the rear plus some other upgrades.

i have the factory limited in the rear now and really like it i rarely need to engage 4wd and usually do for the gearing not the traction. i waffle on e locker for the rear as i understand it to be an open when not engaged. its just money. if the detroit is an issue i can go another direction later if its that critical but i doubt it. lets see after Moab this year.

Hank from NH, soon to be in CO!
 

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An E-Locker for the rear would be ideal though a Detroit Locker is superb too. You'd be able to make tighter turns on the trail by turning the E-Locker off than you could with the Detroit Locker but tight turns are just a little tougher with the Detroit Locker, not impossible. The No-Slip in the front is a good choice, I ran one in the front of my previous TJ for years, with a Detroit Locker in the rear, and loved the combination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
An E-Locker for the rear would be ideal though a Detroit Locker is superb too. You'd be able to make tighter turns on the trail by turning the E-Locker off than you could with the Detroit Locker but tight turns are just a little tougher with the Detroit Locker, not impossible. The No-Slip in the front is a good choice, I ran one in the front of my previous TJ for years, with a Detroit Locker in the rear, and loved the combination.
Howdy. Following up here.

I got everything installed and dialed in ahead of EJS this year. the detroit and no slip were spot on great upgrades. the first few times they popped i crapped my pants but by the end of EJS i got to anticipating when it was going to happen.

Im very happy with the upgrades and thanks so much for the intel!!!!

Hank
 

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A Truetrac is nothing more than a limited slip differential and they are useless on any trail that is uneven enough to lift one of the tires up even slightly off the surface. Nope, stepping on the brakes or pulling the parking brake handle doesn't help enough in that situation. They are best on flat surfaces that are covered with ice, snow, or mud.

If you are wanting this more for offroad use where the trails are uneven you want a true locker. 20+ years ago I had front and rear Truetracs and they were useless on the trails I enjoyed, I replaced both with true lockers.

A rear locker can tend to push a rig straight ahead but not as bad as some claim. I wheeled happily for many years with a Detroit Locker in the rear and a Powertrax No-Slip lunchbox locker up front and all of my trails are tight-twisty trails.

If you can afford it, consider an Eaton E-Locker in the rear. That's a selectable locker you can turn on & off with a switch. I'm now running f/r selectable lockers and they work great. But I wouldn't hate it if for some weird reason I had to go back to my previous Detroit Locker in the future.
So, is a Truetrac the same as a Detroit Truetrac?
 

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Howdy. Following up here.

I got everything installed and dialed in ahead of EJS this year. the detroit and no slip were spot on great upgrades. the first few times they popped i crapped my pants but by the end of EJS i got to anticipating when it was going to happen.

Im very happy with the upgrades and thanks so much for the intel!!!!

Hank
Pics or it didn't happen! 😁
 

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I had a CJ7 with Detroit's front and rear. Steering in slick mud can be tricky especially during a turn to head up a hill.
Later, I installed a Twin Stick and eliminated those problems. Having the ability to lock in front axle only was a real plus!
 

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A Truetrac is nothing more than a limited slip differential and they are useless on any trail that is uneven enough to lift one of the tires up even slightly off the surface. Nope, stepping on the brakes or pulling the parking brake handle doesn't help enough in that situation. They are best on flat surfaces that are covered with ice, snow, or mud.

If you are wanting this more for offroad use where the trails are uneven you want a true locker. 20+ years ago I had front and rear Truetracs and they were useless on the trails I enjoyed, I replaced both with true lockers.

A rear locker can tend to push a rig straight ahead but not as bad as some claim. I wheeled happily for many years with a Detroit Locker in the rear and a Powertrax No-Slip lunchbox locker up front and all of my trails are tight-twisty trails.

If you can afford it, consider an Eaton E-Locker in the rear. That's a selectable locker you can turn on & off with a switch. I'm now running f/r selectable lockers and they work great. But I wouldn't hate it if for some weird reason I had to go back to my previous Detroit Locker in the future.

My TJ has detroits. My wife dries it work on occasion. If you asked her how se likes driving a jeep with a detroit locker, she wouldn't know what you are talking about.

Go easy on the skinny petal and you don't know its there.
 

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I have a Grizzly in the rear of mine, not sure if the Detroit is the same but when on the ground, trans or transfer in neutral, there is 90 degrees or more of 'slop' in the driveline rotation. (Tech at Yukon confirmed this is 'normal')
Not an issue until you crawl over a rock and the momentum of the rig exceeds the speed of the drivetrain and you get a 'clunk'
That is the only downside I have noticed

BTW, Is this the case with a Detroit as well?
 
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