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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I looked at a few new vehicles today at my local Jeep dealer. One is painted in Jazzberry Pearl and one beside it is painted in Velvet Red. To me, and others who were looking at these two cars at the same time same light, etc, the colors were noticeably different. One of the 'others' looking at these two cars was a veteran member of the Jeep dealer's sales staff who said they were, indeed, different.

But in a paint code resource and also other Jeep dealer sites, the paint code is the same for Jazzberry Pearl and any number of other colors including Velvet Red, Passion Red, Octane Red and Delmonico Red. The paint code is PRV

Several different web sites indicate the Jazzberry Pearl is a new color for 2021 yet my paint code resource lists PRV being used on Jeeps in 2020 if not older.

Could someone help me understand what I'm missing? Is it that this color is new to only certain models of Jeep and that this previous color is now called Snazzberry and not Velvet Red? I can see that but looking at two vehicles, side by side, one Jazzberry and the other Velvet Red, they are not the same color.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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It's entirely possible that the formulation for the 2021 paint code PRV is different than the previous formulas, even though the code is the same. To get the "right" color would require both the year and paint code for the paint supplier to mix it correctly.
Of course, if this isn't common knowledge, it could well lead to confusion and errors when ordering paint.

All speculation on my part.

Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Roger, You have a good point but what is still confusing is the two vehicles I was looking at yesterday were both 2021. The noted painted color name on the window sticker was different. The observed paint color was different as well yet the paint code is the same for both colors for 2021.
 

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hoping this thread can help. I have a 2016 grand Cherokee overland. the mopar app says my paint code is snazzberry pearl coat PRV but when I had a paint repair job done in February 2021, they painted the hood and gas hatch velvet red.

(I purchased the car Feb '21 and the previous owner had a bug deflector. I asked the dealership to remove it and I noticed there was rust damage after the purchase. Carvana/Silverrock paid for the repair at Maaco.)

I didn't notice a color difference until months later when the ceramic coat from April kinda wore off. I noticed the hood and gas hatch are completely different. is this a sun damage thing or is snazzberry and velvet red two totally different colors?
 

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We have a ‘20 Grand Cherokee in Velvet Red Pearl, and had the front bumper replaced after getting hit by debris on the freeway. It took the body shop 3 attempts to get the color close to the original. They even had the paint manufacturer’s rep come out and make sure they were mixing the color correctly, and it’s still off. Also our fuel door was noticeably different from the rear of the car from day one. It seems it is a very difficult color to get consistent tones with.
 

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We have a '20 Grand Cherokee in Velvet Red Pearl, and had the front bumper replaced after getting hit by debris on the freeway. It took the body shop 3 attempts to get the color close to the original. They even had the paint manufacturer's rep come out and make sure they were mixing the color correctly, and it's still off. Also our fuel door was noticeably different from the rear of the car from day one. It seems it is a very difficult color to get consistent tones with.
In cases like that, it is better to use the scanner instead of going jist by paint code. Thus will help take into account slight variations in batch, preparation, application, and other variables. Even then, the better paint and body shops will do a blend of adjacent panels which makes the difference a lot less noticeable.

Look at half doors compared to the rest of the body. Many times the difference becomes very pronounced when the half doors are installed. Part of that also has to do with fading over time, with the half doors having less UV exposure, hence having a newer appearance.
 

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In cases like that, it is better to use the scanner instead of going jist by paint code. Thus will help take into account slight variations in batch, preparation, application, and other variables. Even then, the better paint and body shops will do a blend of adjacent panels which makes the difference a lot less noticeable.

Look at half doors compared to the rest of the body. Many times the difference becomes very pronounced when the half doors are installed. Part of that also has to do with fading over time, with the half doors having less UV exposure, hence having a newer appearance.
They actually did use the scanner and ended up having to blend the fenders. We originally didn't want to do that because the entire front end is covered with Xpel paint protection film which meant removing & replacing the Xpel on the fenders as well. Our insurance company (Allstate) was refusing to cover the cost of the ppf. After a couple months of back & forth, and the body shop nagging them, they finally covered the cost to replace the Xpel. This shop had painted a new hood for our '16 Wrangler, as well as more than a few parts for my Corvette (Inferno Orange Metallic) and was able to get a perfect match without any blending but this color gave them some trouble. For 99.9% of people, they won't notice the slight difference in color between the panels, but I can still notice it. It's fine, it's my wife's work vehicle & gets traded-in every 4 years.
 
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