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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, not sure how I missed this.

Couple years ago I did the rear pinion seal and axle shaft seals. I watched a bunch of videos and read writeups. Dropped the driveshaft, marked the pinion nut and all that. Replaced the seal and slapped it back together. Now I need to do the front and I'm finding writeups that state to use red loctite :surprise: .

Does everyone use red loçtite? Really wish I would have seen this before. I can still find videos that make no mention of loctite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I use blue Loctite on the pinion nut.
I was really hoping you were going to say you dont use any. After I'm done with these balljoints I'll have to take a look. Maybe my marks on the rear are still there. I suppose its not a big deal to pull the nut and throw some blue loctite on it.
 

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I use blue Loctite on the pinion nut.
I was really hoping you were going to say you dont use any. After I'm done with these balljoints I'll have to take a look. Maybe my marks on the rear are still there. I suppose its not a big deal to pull the nut and throw some blue loctite on it.
Depending on how long ago it was, I probably wouldn't worry about it. If your rear diff uses a crush sleeve, taking it off again just increases the chance of screwing up the preload. If it uses shims to set the preload, then nothing wrong with taking it off again and throwing some loctite on it, or a new nut, just make sure you torque it to the minimum torque for it
 

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It's a one-time use nut. You should always use a new nut. Many people use red lock tight in addition.

Are you working on an axle with a crush sleeve? If yes, there's more to it than just taking the nut off. And marking the nut is not the best way to do it.
 

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If your rear diff uses a crush sleeve, taking it off again just increases the chance of screwing up the preload.
Crush sleeves have some degree of elasticity so the there's less chance of them having their preload screwed up than with a fixed non-crush sleeve axle.
As far as I know there are two ways that axles set pinion preload, crush sleeves and shims. Non crush sleeve axles are much easier to remove the nut and achieve the correct pinion preload again, as you just have to torque the nut past a certain value and the preload won't increase anymore.

With crush sleeves, 1/16 of a turn with a 3 foot bar on the nut can be the difference between 2 inch pounds of preload and 50. There is a much higher chance of screwing up the preload taking the nut off with a crush sleeve axle, and I doubt you would be able to tighten that nut back exactly to where it was when you took it off. The correct way to do it is to install a new, uncrushed crush sleeve. There are shortcuts that may work sometimes, like marking the nut, but I would never do that
 

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Crush sleeves have some degree of elasticity so the there's less chance of them having their preload screwed up than with a fixed non-crush sleeve axle.
You can screw up the preload very easily with either shims or crush sleeves... if you don't know what you're doing. Even non-first-timers over crush the sleeves and have to discard it for a new one.

And a crush sleeve axle is NEVER as stable as one set up with shims.
 
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