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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Here’s the “new” firewall. I believe it’s from 1974 due to the lack of a fuse box through the firewall. Oddly, it has the mid-1975 and newer “Jeep” stamp on the side. Is this an oddball tub or did they change the stamp in late ‘74?

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Also, can somebody identify this bracket behind the dashboard on the driver’s side? The 1975 tub didn’t have this. I assume it has something to do with the wiring harness.
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I'm in the process of tearing down my 74 tub in hopes my new FG tub gets here soon. It did not have that bracket. That bracket is larger than the 1974 wiring harness which was minimal. You have exposed the holes in the floorboard that in earlier years the pedals would have gone through. Jeep didn't make many changes to the tub through the years.
 

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SaveMyCJ - BTW save for keith460, I believe few have commented on your vintage Warn M8274 winch, or how much (or not) damage it sustained. We have one of those on our '74 CJ-5 - the winch works great, but holding back the pull with a 4 drum brake CJ (as in "equal and opposite") doesn't work so great. Adding disc brakes to your future rebuild list would be nice... ;)

Looks like the motor housing (upper part) is displaced a bit, and the side cast gear case may have sustained some alignment/distortion damage? Those high speed, large spool M8274 winches are classic/vintage correct on the early Jeeps. They now list over over $3,100 bucks these days, and were recently upgraded from 8K to 10K rating per this article in MotorTrend...

 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
SaveMyCJ - BTW save for keith460, I believe few have commented on your vintage Warn M8274 winch, or how much (or not) damage it sustained. We have one of those on our '74 CJ-5 - the winch works great, but holding back the pull with a 4 drum brake CJ (as in "equal and opposite") doesn't work so great. Adding disc brakes to your future rebuild list would be nice... ;)

Looks like the motor housing (upper part) is displaced a bit, and the side cast gear case may have sustained some alignment/distortion damage? Those high speed, large spool M8274 winches are classic/vintage correct on the early Jeeps. They now list over over $3,100 bucks these days, and were recently upgraded from 8K to 10K rating per this article in MotorTrend...

I can’t believe how expensive these things have become! The 8274 is incredible, but you’re right about the brakes on the Jeep. Funny enough, my procedure for pulling other vehicles out of a mud hole consisted of anchoring my rear bumper to a tree and using the 8274 to do all the work. During a recovery, the Jeep was just a mobile support system for the winch on the front 😂

I’m glad it survived. I think it only needs a relay box, but I haven’t tested it yet.
 

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I can’t believe how expensive these things have become! The 8274 is incredible, but you’re right about the brakes on the Jeep. Funny enough, my procedure for pulling other vehicles out of a mud hole consisted of anchoring my rear bumper to a tree and using the 8274 to do all the work. During a recovery, the Jeep was just a mobile support system for the winch on the front 😂

I’m glad it survived. I think it only needs a relay box, but I haven’t tested it yet.
LoL! Yeah if trees were not available (e.g. desert) we sometimes "chocked" all four tires with big rocks, and the person in the driver's seat had both feet planted hard on the very stout brake pedal. Seems 90% of the time you're "saving" other stranded vehicles with that winch, rather than self-rescuing... Glad to hear your 8274 will likely be repairable. (y)
 

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I can’t believe how expensive these things have become! The 8274 is incredible, but you’re right about the brakes on the Jeep. Funny enough, my procedure for pulling other vehicles out of a mud hole consisted of anchoring my rear bumper to a tree and using the 8274 to do all the work. During a recovery, the Jeep was just a mobile support system for the winch on the front 😂

I’m glad it survived. I think it only needs a relay box, but I haven’t tested it yet.
The previously shared Motortrend article on the upgrades to the venerable M8274 mentioned:

"Warn is walking the walk with a new high-output 6-hp motor that can better withstand the needs of today's ever-increasingly heavy vehicle loads. In addition to the motor upgrade, Warn has replaced the old-school solenoid control pack to a much more reliable and efficient Albright contactor system with an IP68 dust, dirt, sand, and waterproof rating. So, the new M8274 is not only more powerful, it should prove more reliable in the long run. And given that there are thousands and thousands of original 8274 winches from the '70s, '80s, and '90s still out there on the trail, that's saying a lot. "

Beyond above article, this next article discusses used winches values out there, and mentions (again) the Warn M8274 and its Bellview predecessors, a company that Warn acquired and build upon...

This great Motortrend article discussed affordable used winch opportunities for Jeeps, that are out there...

 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Bad news about the drivetrain. The transmission is stuck in 4th gear and the stick was banged around so badly that it broke some of the casting where it pivots. The stick will need replacement, but I think this top cover can still be used.
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Upon removing the transmission, the clutch fork pivot ball and seat came out of the bell housing. Looks like I need a new one.

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Regardless of whether or not the top cover of the transmission is good, I’m going to remove it to make sure no pieces of broken casting fell into the gearbox.
 

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With that much violent damage, IDK if I'd trust anything without full inspection.

Not saying you shouldn't use/salvage as much as you can, but I'd definitely verify over trust.

Hoss
 
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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
With that much violent damage, IDK if I'd trust anything without full inspection.

Not saying you shouldn't use/salvage as much as you can, but I'd definitely verify over trust.

Hoss
I’m going to do a quick test start of the engine just to see if it’ll fire. Either way it’s going on a stand and getting inspected. Transmission, transfer case, axles, basically everything is getting opened up and looked over. I hope the axles aren’t bent but the Dana 44 rear might be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I wonder if just the shifter was thrown out of the gate and that is why it seems to be stuck in 4th.
This is a familiar occurrence to me as a T-176 owner. :)
Could you explain what you mean by “thrown out of the gate”? I know the shifter received some pretty extreme forces. When the engine mounts broke loose it hit a lot of stuff like the dashboard, cb radio, floor pans, my right thigh, etc.
 

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Surprised the bell housing is not cracked
 

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Could you explain what you mean by “thrown out of the gate”? I know the shifter received some pretty extreme forces. When the engine mounts broke loose it hit a lot of stuff like the dashboard, cb radio, floor pans, my right thigh, etc.
The Transmission has a gate for each gear so you can only be in one gear at a time. There are one for each rail. The rail can move in only two directions forward or back.
There are interlocks to keep any rail from moving when one rail is in a gear position.
In the T-176 for instance, the gates look like this:
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Normally the end of the shifter (Yellow) is free to move into any of the different gates from neutral
but once in gear, it can't move to a different gate because the gate blocks the movement for any rail but the one you are in.
That way you can't be in two different gears at the same time.

But sometimes the shifter can slip out of a gate and you cant move that gear back into neutral because the shifter is no longer in the gate to pull the gear back and the interlocks keeps any other rail from moving. .
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In a T-176, wear usually cause the shifter to slip but in an accident there could of been enough force to make the shifter pop out of a gate.

Usually you can just take the shifter out and put it back into the correct gate and your good to go....
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
The Transmission has a gate for each gear so you can only be in one gear at a time. There are one for each rail. The rail can move in only two directions forward or back.
There are interlocks to keep any rail from moving when one rail is in a gear position.
In the T-176 for instance, the gates look like this:
View attachment 4150267
Normally the end of the shifter (Yellow) is free to move into any of the different gates from neutral
but once in gear, it can't move to a different gate because the gate blocks the movement for any rail but the one you are in.
That way you can't be in two different gears at the same time.

But sometimes the shifter can slip out of a gate and you cant move that gear back into neutral because the shifter is no longer in the gate to pull the gear back and the interlocks keeps any other rail from moving. .
View attachment 4150272

In a T-176, wear usually cause the shifter to slip but in an accident there could of been enough force to make the shifter pop out of a gate.

Usually you can just take the shifter out and put it back into the correct gate and your good to go....
Your gate theory was correct! It’s in neutral now. I was able to spin it by hand in all 4 gears and reverse. No hard spots or other anomalies. I’m still going to look for a different stick and top cover though.
 

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Here’s the “new” firewall. I believe it’s from 1974 due to the lack of a fuse box through the firewall. Oddly, it has the mid-1975 and newer “Jeep” stamp on the side. Is this an oddball tub or did they change the stamp in late ‘74?
The stamp change was in mid '74, not 75. I have two 74 tubs, one of each stamping.

I'll look at my tubs as well as the two 73 tubs I have to see if they have that bracket you're asking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Alright guys, I’ve slowly started the body work on this “new” cowl. My plan is to build a new tub with reproduction parts from Classic Enterprises. I expect to hit snags, I expect that body mount locations won’t be perfect, but I think I have a solution…

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I have new frame rails from Throttle Down Kustoms. They are a little longer than stock, so I have some wiggle room for the assembly process.
I’m also doing the YJ spring conversion using Old Man Emu CS036R springs.
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Here’s the order of operations…

I’m going to build the tub first. I know the body mounts of the “new” tub will vary from the original. I’m going to assemble the new tub as close to original specs as my skills will allow.

I will also fabricate crossmembers for the frame. Spacing the rails to the original (intermediate CJ5) width of 29.25”.

Next I plan to sit the tub on the frame, using the tub itself as a template for the body mount locations. I’ll fab and weld the body supports to the frame rails.

Once the tub is properly located on the frame, I can locate and weld the motor mounts, trans crossmember, and suspension components. Maintaining the original 84” wheelbase.

After all this I can cut down the frame rails to the original 131.38” (they are 145” now). Disassemble, prime, paint, reassemble, etc.

if anyone here sees a problem with my logic or has a better suggestion, please let me know. This is the best plan I could make within the confines of my garage.
 
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