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jblakeman, the adapter that is used to fill the JGC QL nitrogen reservoir tank can be found here.........

https://www.moparessentialtools.com/...003&type=tools

and it is pictured in the attached file. It appears to just have a standard air tool air line quick coupler male fitting on it. I realize that there are different styles as we use one style for the oiled air lines for the air tools and another style for everything else but that fitting on that adapter looks like a standard air tool fitting to me.
 

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Easy_B;40508681 And we were told it was just the 3/36 that covered the air suspension parts as it is not considered "powertrain". And the MaxCare warranty I priced out was ridiculously expensive. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro[/QUOTE said:
...and that's exactly I purchased the 7/75 Max Care warranty one month after taking delivery of my Limited. The whole air suspension system is covered. Cost was $1,050.
 

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...and that's exactly I purchased the 7/75 Max Care warranty one month after taking delivery of my Limited. The whole air suspension system is covered. Cost was $1,050.
Wow. That is a lot cheaper that what we were quoted via the mailer that FCA sends out to people that are about out of warranty. Don't recall what exactly it was but if I recall it was about 3x that.

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There are a few on line dealers that discount warranty plans significantly. It doesn't matter where you buy it, all dealers love the warranty work.

There have been quite a few threads on the subject, I think Robbins provides consistent good deals.
 

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There are a few on line dealers that discount warranty plans significantly. It doesn't matter where you buy it, all dealers love the warranty work.

There have been quite a few threads on the subject, I think Robbins provides consistent good deals.
Going to look at one on my Wrangler.
Thanks for the name.

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Regardelss if the dealer did use nitrogen or atmosphere air...it’s a mute point since the system should be reliable...I called 3 other FCA Jeep dealers to get their thoughts on my “situation” all service managers told me they seen last week (during the polar vortex...) at least a dozen Grands and Rams with air suspension issues (bottomed out shocks, froze valves, failed compressors). They all use nitrogen and told me FCA has strict policies on Max Care warranty claims that their procedures need to be done to the book including proper use of nitrogen for refill.
 

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jblakeman, the point of using Class or Grade 5 Nitrogen is that it is dry and contains virtually NO moisture.......

"NI 5.0UH 5.0 Ultra High Purity 99.999 %*
O2 < 1 ppm
H2O < 3 ppm
THC < 0.5 ppm"

It has less than 3 parts per million of H2O, as in water. The problem with the QL system in the WK2 JGC, as discussed previously in this thread of yours, is that if there is any sort of leak, the system takes in atmosphere air to compensate for the lost nitrogen and along with the atmosphere air comes moisture. What really pisses me off is that there is no notification through the EVIC that the QL system is doing this so if you drive the vehicle daily you'll probably never notice that there is a problem until your moisture laden QL system freezes up or your compressor croaks from contamination and overuse because the system isn't up to pressure. The forum must have scrambled that link to the short adapter that is used to fill the JGC QL nitrogen reservoir tank because it's still works with my copy of that comment that I posted. Just do a search for the item number 2062703020 on that Mopar Essential Tools and Service Equipment page that the link in this forum brings you to. I took a look at the service valve on the QL nitrogen reservoir tank on this '11 JGC, which for some strange reason is on the passenger side, and it looks just like a service valve on the low pressure side of an R134a A/C system, which might be why the knob on that Mopar Short Adapter that is used to fill the JGC QL nitrogen reservoir tank is the color blue. I'm going to get out the vernier calipers to see if that is in fact what it is. To refill the QL system exactly as prescribed by the Factory Service Manual you would need a wiTECH scan tool but you might be able to get by with using the ScanGauge II vehicle system monitoring tool that is discussed in the thread that ColdCase linked to, as it reports QL system pressure. Either that, or just wing it and hope for the best. The QL system on this JGC is on borrowed time if the moisture isn't purged from the system asap and I don't trust the dealers to do the maintenance after what I've read in these forums. Even though the system still works, at least when the temperature is above freezing, they'd probably tell me that the compressor and control valve are shot and need to be replaced to the tune of thousands of dollars. That aint happening!
 

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I got the vernier calipers out and although it's a bit difficult to get to the service valve on the QL nitrogen reservoir tank to measure it, it does in fact appear to be the same service valve that is used on the low pressure side of an R134a A/C system. That must be why the knob on the Mopar short adapter that is used to fill the JGC QL nitrogen reservoir tank is the color blue. So that simplifies being able to put nitrogen into the QL system tremendously as those R134a quick release couplers are cheap. I called around in my search for a supplier for grade or class 5 nitrogen (99.999% pure) and every person that I spoke with said that you can just use industrial grade nitrogen(99.995% pure) which is cheap @ $15 for 60cft, the smallest cylinder that it comes in at the first distributor that I spoke with, that quoted a price. I had to explain to the salesman that the Factory Service Manual specs class or grade 5 nitrogen and emphasizes the point with bold text so he looked into the cost of Ultra High Purity(UHP) Grade 5 nitrogen and came back with a price of $75 for an 80 cft cylinder, the smallest size that it comes in there, which is almost four times as expensive as their industrial grade nitrogen. The whole QL system probably requires a couple cft to fill, at most, so you end up buying way more than you need, in any case. I called the local Airgas distributor and the girl I spoke with insisted that the only size that their UHP nitrogen comes in is a 300 cft cylinder, which I know isn't true but I didn't want to argue the point. It is cheaper per cft, at 50 cents a cft but you're buying 300 cft when you only need a couple and the high pressure steel cylinder is five foot tall and probably weighs more than I do. It was almost as if she was trying her best to not make a sale. I spoke with a salesman of a third local specialty gas distributor about two other types of grade 5 nitrogen that they sell other than UHP nitrogen, as the smallest cylinder that they produce of UHP is 200 cft. The two other types of grade 5 nitrogen are for specific applications and spec purity rates for other contents in the gas which I don't think is important as far as the QL system goes but they come in the smaller A3 size, which is a 31 cft aluminum cylinder, so I was hoping that it would be less expensive than buying the 80 cft cylinder of UHP from the first specialty gas distributor that I spoke with. The salesman from the third specialty gas distributor that I spoke with took my name and phone number and said that he'd look into it and would call me back with a price but he never did. I'm going to call again on Monday morning to get a price. There is some money to be made here if a specialty gas distributor would supply a small cylinder, such as a 20 cft bottle of UHP nitrogen as I expect that there would be a lot of interest from QL equipped JGC owners who would like to maintain the QL systems in their JGC without getting screwed over by the dealers.
 

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Macmechanic, When providers specify a volume of gas that they are selling, they are specifying the volume it would occupy at a normal atmospheric temperature (something like 70 degrees F) and pressure (14.7 psi absolute pressure).
So let's say that you are buying 80 cubic feet of hydrogen. If the gas were at ambient pressure and temperature, your cylinder size would be 80 ft3. Can you imagine carrying home a cylinder that measures 2ft x 2ft x 20ft? Or 4 ft x 4 ft x 5 ft? Of course not.
Gases are stored and sold in compressed form. Since the settled gas temperature will be the same both before and after compression, the applicable equation is: Va x Pa = Vc x Pc, meaning that the volume multiplied by pressure will be the same at any combination volume and pressure so long as temperature remains the same.
So, what volume would 80 cubic feet of nitrogen at ambient conditions occupy if compressed to 200 psi? 80 x 14.7 = Vc x 200. Solving for Vc, Vc = (80 x 14.7)/200, or 5.88 cubic feet.
Hope this helps.
 

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andyo5, yes I understand that, how else could you get 300 cft into a 9x55 inch tank? I haven't done the math but the JGC QL nitrogen reservoir tank is 10.6L which from what I've read, you have to fill twice to 175 psi to fill the QL system, so how much nitrogen is required? Am I incorrect in thinking that 300, 80, or even 60 cft is way too much and that a 20 cft cylinder, which is not even available, would a better choice? The smallest volume that I might be able to get is 31 cft, which would be a much better choice if it's proportionally the same or a little more expensive than the next available size, which is 80 cft. Am I wrong in thinking that most of it won't be used and will be wasted when I return the cylinder, no matter what I buy?
 

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Actually, that last comment of mine isn't entirely correct because the QL nitrogen reservoir tank pressure isn't going to drop to zero after filling the rear air shocks so it probably doesn't even require twice the volume of the QL nitrogen reservoir tank pressurized to 175 psi to completely fill the QL system with nitrogen.
 

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macmechanic, I don't fully understand the filling procedure you have described. But I can tell you that 10.6 liters is 0.374 cubic feet. To pressurize it to 175 psia, you would have to start with 4.45 cubic feet of gas at ambient pressure.
 

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andyo5, in order to fill the QL nitrogen reservoir tank, you connect the Air Suspension Refill Tool 10247B, which is nothing more than an unadjustable gas regulator that is preset to 175 psi which has the proper quick connect adapter coupler connected to the hose, to the QL nitrogen reservoir tank. You open the on/off valve on the tool which pressurizes the QL nitrogen reservoir tank to 175 psi. You close the valve and use the scan tool to fill the rear air shocks one at a time. You then use the Air Suspension Refill Tool to pressurize the QL nitrogen reservoir tank again, close the valve, and fill the front air struts one at a time. You then use the scan tool to fine tune the QL system pressure by adding to/venting from the system so that it is within spec (188 - 216 bar-liters), but of course I won't be able to do it that way as I don't have access to a wiTECH scan tool. So according to your calculations, the first fill of the empty tank will require 4.45 cft and I expect that after the rear shocks are filled that the QL nitrogen reservoir tank will have residual pressure in it so the second fill will be some fraction of that 4.45 cft. It's more than the couple of cft that I had assumed but it's still a tiny fraction of the 80 cft that I may be forced to buy. So as I suspected, even a 20 cft cylinder of UHP nitrogen would be more than plenty for the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Two months with a new compressor and now getting the message “Air Suspension System - Cooling Down Please Wait” and it having difficulty going to OR1 / OR2. Now hearing clearly it discharging air between height changes like someone disconnected an air hose....it still gets to the height but thinking it shouldn’t be getting that “hot” that quickly....40 degree temps in WI.
 

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Thats not right unless you are changing heights several times over a 15 minute period or so. That can warm up the compressor.
 

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Two months with a new compressor and now getting the message "Air Suspension System - Cooling Down Please Wait" and it having difficulty going to OR1 / OR2. Now hearing clearly it discharging air between height changes like someone disconnected an air hose....it still gets to the height but thinking it shouldn't be getting that "hot" that quickly....40 degree temps in WI.
I wonder if they pressure tested the system before they gave it back to you. I would assume they had to when filling it??? But for sure sounds like there is a leak and it is causing the compressor to heat up.

Frustrating.

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jblakeman, you should find a different dealer and if you already have an Android device, do yourself a favor and get AlfaOBD.........

http://www.alfaobd.com/

and.......

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.AlfaOBD.AlfaOBD

and if you need a scan tool this one is very popular among AlfaOBD users........

https://www.scantool.net/obdlink-mxbt/

and if you would also like IOS compatibility, an IOS compatible version is available for $10 more......

https://www.scantool.net/obdlink-mxp/

AlfaOBD will allow you to monitor the QL system in your JGC and will give you access to the procedures to maintain it. If I were you I wouldn't be using anything other than NRH until you get the QL system straightened out.
 

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New here! just bought a 2011 Overland with 105,000 miles and am really nervous about the air suspension. It didn't have any problems on the test drive, but with all the problems these have, I'm a bit worried. Any tips on how to identify a problem quickly? I have a 5-day warranty that I don't want to use, but if there is an issue with it, I will probably try to find another Jeep
 

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New here! just bought a 2011 Overland with 105,000 miles and am really nervous about the air suspension. It didn't have any problems on the test drive, but with all the problems these have, I'm a bit worried. Any tips on how to identify a problem quickly? I have a 5-day warranty that I don't want to use, but if there is an issue with it, I will probably try to find another Jeep
Good luck. My 12 overland with 45k miles only and I've had the front air lines , compressor, all fitting, check valve and compressor to tank lines replaced. Front air lines have been replaced twice. All within the last yr and 8k miles. Extend warranty has been great besides the 150 dollar nitrogen refill each time. A total of $3,500 in air suspension parts. The jeep came from the south. Only 1 yr in Iowa and I've had this many issue. Patiently waiting on the rear lines to go so the whole system is new lol

Good luck with the jeep
Woodsy

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