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I must admit, after reading about all the Quadralift problems on this forum and others, I wish I had avoided it. A suspension that could fail and leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere at 2am? Not worth it. A regular spring/damper suspension would not do that.
 

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Thanks all for replies...my dealer of choice is backed up in doing recall work and can't see me for two more weeks. Keeping the fuse out has worked...no issues other than the occasional service bleep in the EVIC...

After it's "fixed" I may just keep the fuse out...I never really use the raise / lower features and this way if another leak sprouts up I'll notice it before the new compressor craps out again....

I still don't regret my choice...the Overland had everything I wanted...though it would have been nice if the QL was an option instead of standard...after warranty expires I will swap out the shocks for traditional sprung units if I keep the beast....
Thanks for the write up. Questions:
1. Where is the J1 fuse located in the TIPM? I have looked in mine but did not see the fuses identified.
2. So if I set mine to normal height and then pulled the fuse, it would stay at normal height?

My Jeep is pretty new and the compressor sounds fine, but I am collecting information to use just in case that it screws up sometime in the future.
Thanks!
 

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After studying my TIPM more closely, it seems that mine is a different version than the one used on the 2012 Jeeps. On my 2018, there are no fuses or other elements marked 'J'. All fuses are marked 'F'. The fuse designated for the air lift compressor is fuse F05. I have located it. It is a 40 amp fuse located on the far right rear corner of the TIPM.
 

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I saw the "Service Air Suspension System" EVIC message one time just recently but the QL seems to work fine and I haven't seen it since.
It's odd how the computer will send fault messages such as 'service 4wd system' (as I got yesterday) when everything is actually working. I had shifted into Sand mode. I saw two messages appear. "traction control off" plus the picture of the Jeep with squiggly lines, and "service 4wd". In sand mode, traction control is supposed to be off. The odd part was that the traction control button did not illuminate at first. After shutting the engine off and restarting in auto mode, the messages disappeared. When I shifted into sand mode again, the "traction control off" reappeared, this time with the button illuminated as supposed to be. No "service 4wd" message appeared for the rest of the day. Maybe it is learning what to do.
 

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There were quite a few reports of the service 4WD message when using sand mode over the years. Unless you were driving it hard and the clutches got hot, what you may be seeing are the symtoms of a balky shift mechanism. The transfer case is not in the position the computer wants, so it displays the indication, perhaps goes into default limp mode, which may over ride traction control settings.

There have been software updates over the years that address this. Perhaps its just one of those wear in items that loosen things up with use.
Good information. Thanks!
 

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Easy_B;40508681 And we were told it was just the 3/36 that covered the air suspension parts as it is not considered "powertrain". And the MaxCare warranty I priced out was ridiculously expensive. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro[/QUOTE said:
...and that's exactly I purchased the 7/75 Max Care warranty one month after taking delivery of my Limited. The whole air suspension system is covered. Cost was $1,050.
 

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Macmechanic, When providers specify a volume of gas that they are selling, they are specifying the volume it would occupy at a normal atmospheric temperature (something like 70 degrees F) and pressure (14.7 psi absolute pressure).
So let's say that you are buying 80 cubic feet of hydrogen. If the gas were at ambient pressure and temperature, your cylinder size would be 80 ft3. Can you imagine carrying home a cylinder that measures 2ft x 2ft x 20ft? Or 4 ft x 4 ft x 5 ft? Of course not.
Gases are stored and sold in compressed form. Since the settled gas temperature will be the same both before and after compression, the applicable equation is: Va x Pa = Vc x Pc, meaning that the volume multiplied by pressure will be the same at any combination volume and pressure so long as temperature remains the same.
So, what volume would 80 cubic feet of nitrogen at ambient conditions occupy if compressed to 200 psi? 80 x 14.7 = Vc x 200. Solving for Vc, Vc = (80 x 14.7)/200, or 5.88 cubic feet.
Hope this helps.
 

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macmechanic, I don't fully understand the filling procedure you have described. But I can tell you that 10.6 liters is 0.374 cubic feet. To pressurize it to 175 psia, you would have to start with 4.45 cubic feet of gas at ambient pressure.
 
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