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Discussion Starter · #61 · (Edited)
Thanks for the replies there - guess I'll go with the 5 leaf set just for the better ride. You're right, not gonna doing a ton of hard work with it. Might load up the back with some wood on occasion is probably about it.

So, I mentioned I'd give a little more background info. Dad came over to take a look the day I got out if out of the barn and was definitely happy to see it running again. Said it felt like the old days. lol

At 19 years old, my dad bought this jeep in 1976. He drove it in and out of the hollow they lived in to get to work. The following winter he completely flipped it over in the snow and got injured pretty badly. The windshield broke and cut through his jacket, leaving a gnarly scar on his forearm. He had some other injures as well, but fortunately recovered quickly. The Jeep ran upside down for a bit before he got it shut off, which apparently damaged the crankshaft. The next spring he completely rebuilt the engine with the help of his friend, a diesel mechanic who spent time in Vietnam. He recalled the confusion they had on the distributor rotation, and after finding out it turns counter-clockwise the engine fired right up.

I don't know if it's obvious or not, but we're really just doing the bare-minimum to get it running and driving for now. (Brakes, fluids, broken parts, etc.) As long as I know we won't burn up a differential or something I'll be happy. It's for that reason I'm just going to replace the rear springs and leave the front alone until I think they need changing. We probably won't ever get it aligned (unless we do it ourselves with a tape measure) just because we'll only be using it off-road. I do want to inspect the front end thoroughly and be sure to grease all the components. I'm sure it'll be easy to do when we take all the wheels off for the brake hardware.

I'm currently searching out these answers, but... what are the preferred fluids for the Transmission and T-case? It seems they share oil, or at least started sharing oil after a certain point. (Model CJ-2A S/N 24196, which is 1946?) I'm not afraid to splurge on high-quality synthetics. The FSM calls for SAE 80/90 GL4 gear lube in the Borg Warner T90 and D18. I have a few quarts of Royal Purple 75-90 gear oil leftover from when I changed the oil in my Dodge Ram 2500, and according to the website it's safe for yellow metals and synchronizers.

I'll just top off the front and rear differentials to make sure there aren't any leaky seals before I completely drain and clean them.
 

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Thanks for the replies there - guess I'll go with the 5 leaf set just for the better ride. You're right, not gonna doing a ton of hard work with it. Might load up the back with some wood on occasion is probably about it.

So, I mentioned I'd give a little more background info. Dad came over to take a look the day I got out if out of the barn and was definitely happy to see it running again. Said it felt like the old days. lol

At 19 years old, my dad bought this jeep in 1976. He drove it in and out of the hollow they lived in to get to work. The following winter he completely flipped it over in the snow and got injured pretty badly. The windshield broke and cut through his jacket, leaving a gnarly scar on his forearm. He had some other injures as well, but fortunately recovered quickly. The Jeep ran upside down for a bit before he got it shut off, which apparently damaged the crankshaft. The next spring he completely rebuilt the engine with the help of his friend, a diesel mechanic who spent time in Vietnam. He recalled the confusion they had on the distributor rotation, and after finding out it turns counter-clockwise the engine fired right up.

I don't know if it's obvious or not, but we're really just doing the bare-minimum to get it running and driving for now. (Brakes, fluids, broken parts, etc.) As long as I know we won't burn up a differential or something I'll be happy. It's for that reason I'm just going to replace the rear springs and leave the front alone until I think they need changing. We probably won't ever get it aligned (unless we do it ourselves with a tape measure) just because we'll only be using it off-road. I do want to inspect the front end thoroughly and be sure to grease all the components. I'm sure it'll be easy to do when we take all the wheels off for the brake hardware.

I'm currently searching out these answers, but... what are the preferred fluids for the Transmission and T-case? It seems they share oil, or at least started sharing oil after a certain point. (Model CJ-2A S/N 24196, which is 1946?) I'm not afraid to splurge on high-quality synthetics. The FSM calls for SAE 80/90 GL4 gear lube in the Borg Warner T90 and D18. I have a few quarts of Royal Purple 75-90 gear oil leftover from when I changed the oil in my Dodge Ram 2500, and according to the website it's safe for yellow metals and synchronizers.

I'll just top off the front and rear differentials to make sure there aren't any leaky seals before I completely drain and clean them.
Super cool that Dad gets to see it come back to life. Heck of a history too. lol

As to your oil..... maybe do some more reading on that. I don't know about your gearboxes, but I sifted through a bunch of threads while I was trying to figure it out. The GL-4 rating might be important. SOME of the newer GL-5 stuff may be safe for the synchros and thrust washers, and "backwards compatible" to the GL-4..... but the transmission might not like it? Plenty of guys complained the GL-5 made for shifting issues. I noticed in reading reviews elsewhere, that some Nissans and European vehicles had a similar problem. GL-5 bad, GL-4 good, at least in those instances. Must be something to it. :dunno: For your uses though, might not matter?

I picked up a CRC product, Sta-Lube, from NAPA. GL-4 in an 85w-90 if I remember right. It was like $45 for a gallon? Wife picked it up actually, paid $1 for their fancy reusable bag, and got 20% off. My wife is cheap, and doesn't take flack from anyone. It's sometimes beneficial to send her out for things. She gets results. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Super cool that Dad gets to see it come back to life. Heck of a history too. lol

As to your oil..... maybe do some more reading on that. I don't know about your gearboxes, but I sifted through a bunch of threads while I was trying to figure it out. The GL-4 rating might be important. SOME of the newer GL-5 stuff may be safe for the synchros and thrust washers, and "backwards compatible" to the GL-4..... but the transmission might not like it? Plenty of guys complained the GL-5 made for shifting issues. I noticed in reading reviews elsewhere, that some Nissans and European vehicles had a similar problem. GL-5 bad, GL-4 good, at least in those instances. Must be something to it. :dunno: For your uses though, might not matter?

I picked up a CRC product, Sta-Lube, from NAPA. GL-4 in an 85w-90 if I remember right. It was like $45 for a gallon? Wife picked it up actually, paid $1 for their fancy reusable bag, and got 20% off. My wife is cheap, and doesn't take flack from anyone. It's sometimes beneficial to send her out for things. She gets results. :laugh:
Yeah, from what I know anything with yellow metal synchronizers will not be safe with GL5 gear oil. I've run into the same issue with the manual transmissions in my VW Passat and Dodge. You can have some transmissions rebuilt with carbon fiber synchronizers instead of brass for GL5 compatibility, but I'll probably stick with brass. As long as you know what oil you need it's not a problem. :cool: Sadly the previous owner of my truck changed the transmission oil at some point and it definitely wasn't the right kind. The synchos howl pretty bad if you don't have the RPMs lined up close for a shift. I put in Redline MT85 when I bought it and it helped some, but they're still noisy. I think I can make it last a long time just by driving it easy though.

Got some parts ordered Yesterday. Rear leaf spring packs, Pivot eye bolts and bushings, shackles, along with some smaller items like the air filter hose and carburetor horn. Did some looking around on the underside of the Jeep last night and it's making me nervous how corroded everything is. I guess just about anything can be replaced, thankfully, but it feels like a waste to spend ~$1,000 or so on such a rough project. :rolleyes: Dad got the new master cylinder installed, but I'm probably going to need to replace almost everything else in the brake system too. The flex lines are most certainly dry rotted, and I'm not too comfortable with the amount of rust on the metal lines either. I'm gonna try to get it on jack stands soon in order to soak EVERYTHING that's supposed to move with Kroil. The last thing I need is a dozen broken-off bolts. :laugh: I really, really want to get the hand brake functioning as well. The last thing I want is to rely on the hydraulic brakes only to have them fail in a precarious scenario. I'm also planning to replace all the grease fittings in order to probably lube whatever needs it.

Anyway, he's a few more pics. Feel free to give input on the things I need to inspect/examine/replace before we take it on its new maiden voyage in a few weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
It doesn't really look too bad to be honest.

I'd take a power washer to it first and see what's under all that dirt

Might need a few body mounts also.. Can't quite figure out what's going on with picture #3
Nice to hear you don't think it's all that bad. Definitely taking a pressure washer to it ASAP.

The body mounts appear to have been replaced with channel iron years and years ago. The body is propped up with assorted pieces of scrap steel which is keeping it attached to the frame.

Picture 3 is basically showing one of the rear leaf springs sticking really far out of the pack and almost touching the underside of the body. Kind of a wonder it can be moved at all without the rear axle just falling off.
 

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Looks like Dad really got his use out of the old dog, before he stopped feeding it years ago!
 
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Pict 1:
PTO
Parking brake cable missing
Output seal/shim pack leaking
Pict 3:
Broken/missing springs
I would ditch the coil over shocks. Shock mounts aren't built to carry vehicle weight and will eventually break.
Pict 4:
'Broken/missing body mount.
You will want to check the pedal pivots as they wear out over time.
Pict6:
9" non self adjusting brakes. Lots of possible upgrades there. They go hand in hand with a single master cylinder, which should be upgraded also.
I'm betting those knuckles are dry. You might want to dissemble them and inspect the bearings to insure the upper ones are serviceable. The seals should be replaced, but if they are somewhat serviceable, you can replace them (after cleaning the knuckle surface) and fill the knjuckle with a mix of grease and 90WT.
Again, I would replace those shocks.

Again, you're gonna need to replace the springs and the shocks, I would opt for the 2.5 lift.
 

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Take a hard look at the steering box. wear in the pitman shaft contact points and the bushings. The contact points will wear down or chip, causing looseness in the box. The bushings will aslo wear, allowing the shaft to rock in the housing. They should run 90WT not grease.

Also check the bellcrank. They are prone to vertical movement, equating in excessive steering slop.
Both are rebuildable, which will make the steering acceptable, but The cumulative effect of the system can make the steering seriously vague and sloppy. A conversion to a single drag link, or better, a Saginaw box on the front rail will vastly improve steering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Pict 1:
PTO
Parking brake cable missing
Output seal/shim pack leaking
Pict 3:
Broken/missing springs
I would ditch the coil over shocks. Shock mounts aren't built to carry vehicle weight and will eventually break.
Pict 4:
'Broken/missing body mount.
You will want to check the pedal pivots as they wear out over time.
Pict6:
9" non self adjusting brakes. Lots of possible upgrades there. They go hand in hand with a single master cylinder, which should be upgraded also.
I'm betting those knuckles are dry. You might want to dissemble them and inspect the bearings to insure the upper ones are serviceable. The seals should be replaced, but if they are somewhat serviceable, you can replace them (after cleaning the knuckle surface) and fill the knjuckle with a mix of grease and 90WT.
Again, I would replace those shocks.

Again, you're gonna need to replace the springs and the shocks, I would opt for the 2.5 lift.
Yeah, I'll probably have to do a lot of work to get the parking brake working. Then again, the lever moves freely, so maybe not?
How difficult is the output seal? Drop the shaft, pull it out and tap a new one in?
We already have the new master cylinder on, just need to finish up everything else. I'm sure it's possible to upgrade and, as much as I'd love to, this is strictly a budget build for right now.
Definitely want to clean and lube the knuckles.
I'll look into new shocks.

MTS Fuel tank http://www.mtscompany.com/jeep.htm part number 0041. American made.
Not really interested right now, but I'll save that link for later. The portable boat tanks work surprisingly well and we don't have to transfer fuel from a separate can into a built-in tank.

Take a hard look at the steering box. wear in the pitman shaft contact points and the bushings. The contact points will wear down or chip, causing looseness in the box. The bushings will aslo wear, allowing the shaft to rock in the housing. They should run 90WT not grease.

Also check the bellcrank. They are prone to vertical movement, equating in excessive steering slop.
Both are rebuildable, which will make the steering acceptable, but The cumulative effect of the system can make the steering seriously vague and sloppy. A conversion to a single drag link, or better, a Saginaw box on the front rail will vastly improve steering.
I was actually shocked that the steering is so tight. I have a 2nd gen Dodge, so I know what slop feels like! :rofl: Fortunately I think I can get away with a cleaning and inspection for right now.
 

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Rear seal involves removing the yoke nut, yoke/brake drum. From there you will want to insure it is the seal leaking and not the shim pack. You can usually tell by double checking the housing bolts for tightness and observing any oil tracking. I they are tight , then inspect the yoke to insure it isn't grooved. If it is the seal, you can either pry it out or remove the housing to get the seal out.


As for the parking brake, inspect the shoes to insure they are serviceable. If they are, adjust the shoes, then attach the cable clevis to the arm. Adjust the cable and you are in.
 
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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Tonight we started dropping the old springs. Everything was pretty crusty, and the top shock mount was ripped out on the right side. (Probably due to the spring-over shocks, as suggested above) We had to cut the u bolts off the axle to get it loose. We got the nuts off the spring mount bolts but they won't budge out of the mounts. I'll grab an air hammer soon and maybe that'll help.

The brakes look pretty good under the hubs. Unfortunately it looks like I'll need a front seal for the rear differential because it started leaking oil when it was tipped downward, and one of the u-joints is loose.

All in a day's work I suppose.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system Rim
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Wood Vehicle Locking hubs


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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Some heat and a new air chisel made quick work of the bushings. Ready to place another order from Kaiserwillys for u-bolts and other small items.

I did a quick inspection of the parking brake and I could see the shoes moving in and out with the lever. Absolutely none of the hardware remains for it though. Wood Gas Automotive exterior Brick Bumper
Wood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Tire Metal
Wood Natural material Snout Metal Tire
Wood Gesture Grey Sculpture Nail
Wood Gas Automotive tire Machine Metal
Vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Tire


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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Lordy, what happened to that sleeve? Don't think I've ever seen damage like that before.
I did that with the punch tip on my air hammer. Lol I had to burn the rubber out of it first with the torch, then the outer part was stuck in there pretty good.

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I did that with the punch tip on my air hammer. Lol I had to burn the rubber out of it first with the torch, then the outer part was stuck in there pretty good.

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Ah, gotcha. Oh, man ... burning rubber ... YUCK!

I got some air hammer drifts ... marvelous little things!
 

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For stubborn sleeves, you can cut it with a hack saw. I like to cut a simple slot with a sawzall. That will loosen it up and then it will usually tap right out.
 
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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Did a few more menial tasks today considering I'm out of parts. Gave it a good wipe down with a rag and some soapy water, which I had to change four times. Mounted my new fuse box on the fender well and got the choke cable hooked back up.

Car Land vehicle Vehicle Automotive parking light Tire
Automotive tire Wood Motor vehicle Gas Bumper


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Good lord. That's one of those wash jobs that doubles the resale value :laugh:

What are you doing for wiring? Running it from scratch? I had some good experience with Wire Barn recently, if you're just wanting wire and stuff. The website isn't the best, but they are SUPER responsive to questions and emails. I thought they'd screwed up my first order (the spools were just mislabeled) but the owner was texting/emailing until 11pm to make sure it got squared away. :eek: I wanted some more battery cable terminals too. Not on his site, but he had them, and added them to my order.
 
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