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Let's look at page 59 (D section) in here. https://oljeep.com/53CjDj/53-71JeepCjDjServiceManual.pdf

After you look at page 59, you probably will never ever need all of that info in that PDF ever again!

Mr. Oil pump is driven off of the cam.

There is a slot in the end for the distributor to be rotated

Therefore the distributor can fit in one way and 180 degrees the other way----you cannot just move the slot as with a 258 or 304

You can move the slots position by snatching the oil pump out--moving the gear and reinserting it.

Lets not do that now/ yet!

Lets find TDC and see where the rotor button is pointing------

We may need to twist the distributor to meet up----or----take it out slightly and

rotate the rotor button 180 degrees to line up and still have "timing adjustment"

Send your results

Here's how to do it

This is a 4 stroke engine it takes 2 complete crankshaft revolutions to make 1 cycle.

In doing so, the timing marks will be at zero twice.

TDC only will be achieved once.

In order to find which revolution TDC is at, try this procedure.

Hide your keys (will not hand crank and start w/ no keys turned on!)/chock your wheels/ go to neutral

Remove #1 spark plug

Stick it back in , maybe 2 threads (instead of using your thumb)

Rotate the engine with a wrench or ratchet (not the starter) it's too EZ to bump it too far if you are new at this.

Clockwise as viewed from the grill.

When you hear the "hiss" coming by #1 plug-----STOP! ( a friend may be helpful to hear this at #1, the other cylinders hiss internally (usually a lot fainter) when you rotate the engine manually.

Now, we are on/ beginning the compression stroke on #1 cylinder (piston has just started coming up)

We ain't up yet!

Ever so slowly rotate the engine (cw) till your timing mark (line) lines up with zero!

STOP!!!

Bumping with the starter confuses a beginner, marks get overrun, then he mistakenly rotates on around 180 degrees from where you should be (not sayin' bad things, but if you are new to this, it's an ez mistake!)

Back to finding TDC of the engine.

OK, back to our slow-motion movements!

Now look at the rotor button.

it should be facing one of the towers on the 'stributor (or close)

.......or which ever tower you chose to be #1 (textbook position or not)

The engine/ cam/ crank don't care which one it is!

As long as you were at TDC, you placed #1 spark plug wire on "that tower" (the one that rotor is pointing to).....or make it happen

DO NOT MOVE THE CRANK---Your timing marks on the pulley and numbers below the water pump should be lined up on "0" (TDC)

We may need to twist the distributor to meet up----or----take it out slightly and

rotate the rotor button 180 degrees to line up and still have "timing adjustment"

Send your results

OH I HAVE PLENTY MORE IF THIS IS NOT THE ISSUE!!!!!

I'll go back and re-read thru the skimming I did to get here.

-----JEEPFELLER

JEEPFELLER
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Mr. Oil pump is driven off of the cam.

There is a slot in the end for the distributor to be rotated

Therefore the distributor can fit in one way and 180 degrees the other way----you cannot just move the slot as with a 258 or 304

You can move the slots position by snatching the oil pump out--moving the gear and reinserting it.
.
The distributor slot is offset. It can only go in one way. It can't be installed 180 off.

Once you get spark, align your timing marks at 5 degrees before TDC compression, rotate the dist with the direction of rotation till the points are closed (they may be already), rotate back against the direction of rotation till the points juuuuust crack open (you will get a spark if the ign is on), tighten the dist down (timing will be close), install the cap and pick the tower that is over the rotor blade and choose that one as the #1 cylinder.

Don't forget to insure the point gap is correct and reset the timing using a light when you are through.
 

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If you have a trouble light, you could hook the light up to the wire to the points (-) on the ignition coil. When the light is on, the points are open, when the light is off, the points are closed.

Looks like the ballast resistor was only used on the V6 and not on the I4

Do you know if you have a 12 volt or 6 volt system?
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
If you have a trouble light, you could hook the light up to the wire to the points (-) on the ignition coil. When the light is on, the points are open, when the light is off, the points are closed.

Looks like the ballast resistor was only used on the V6 and not on the I4

Do you know if you have a 12 volt or 6 volt system?
Yes, it's a 12 volt system. It did have a ballast resistor on the firewall, so I hooked it back up and got fire. More on that below...

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
SO.... Lots of good news and progress today. Firstly, thanks to everyone who chimed in with the wealth of info. Fortunately I didn't have to utilize all of it, but I did get it running and driving!

This morning I went out and installed the new coil and plug wires. Using my spark tester I noted that there was no spark on any cylinders. I remembered what was previously mentioned about the points opening to fire the coil, so I removed the distributor cap and plate to investigate. I don't know this system well enough to use the right nomenclature, but I cleaned the contacts where the spring point contacts the ground wire and that seemed to fix it. After that I put it all back together with the plug wires in factory position and got it to fire up with gas poured down the carb.

Then I had to address the gas supply. I cut a new cork gasket for the fuel bulb and attached the fuel filter to the pump. I ran my 1/4 line to the pump and attached the other end to my boat tank connector. I stuck my head in the engine bay and sucked on the fuel filter just long enough to prime it and got fuel running through the bowl. After that it was easy peasy to get it running on it's own with a little attention to the choke and throttle.

Suffice it to say, I'm very impressed with how easily it all came together.

My dad came home and got to drive it around for the first time in 20 years, with me in the passenger seat and my three-year-old in my lap. It was a fun day for everyone.

Lastly, we pulled it in my basement to continue working on it. There are tons of things left to address, such as brakes, leaf springs, cleaning, new wiring, and fluids. Once I'm not on my phone I'll fill in some details I learned about this vehicle's history.

Oh yeah, and is there any way to retrofit a newer style of alternator on this thing?


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1974 Jeep CJ-6
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OH YEAH!

Pertronix---the way to go!

Insure you get the correct one for your distributor model number.

Post 13 in here https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/help-identifying-part-4442627/

It took me a while to cave in, but this way really makes a difference in the way it runs, is so simple to install.

One less thing to troubleshoot or maintain--Easy to reverse if it fails.

----JEEPFELLER
 
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I don't know this system well enough to use the right nomenclature, but I cleaned the contacts where the spring point contacts the ground wire and that seemed to fix it.

There are tons of things left to address, such as brakes, leaf springs, cleaning, new wiring, and fluids.
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Mild corrosion (rust) on the contact faces is a very common issue with points, especially with ones that have been sitting open for a long time.

Pull the points and with a small file, clean the faces to get any rust and pitting off. Observe the contacts to insure they close flat. If they are off, take a small set of needle nosed pliers and bend the support till they contact flat. Reinstall and set the point gap, then the timing.

I would do this before going on to other things.

Top of my "revive" list is:
Brakes and fluids.
Nothing says "I love you dad" than backing out into the side of his car because the Jeep doesn't have any brakes......
 

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Your top is very similar to mine that I sometimes use on my '46, (the silhouette)

We remade my doors so that it eliminated the piece that made it hard to get in, with your feet.

----JEEPFELLER
 

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The Pertronix conversion is the easiest and least time consuming modification I've ever done to my Jeep. From the time the mail lady put the package in my hand until I drove it to lunch was less than 30 minutes. The cost from Summit racing was less than $100. I could have gotten it cheaper but Summit said they had it in stock could get it to me in two days and they did and even sent me an email when I could expect delivery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Made lots more progress today - I pulled the carpet to clean it all and started the rewire. Dad removed the master cylinder and son did some vacuuming.

I removed everything that either needed work or didn't work at all. The oil bath filter canister needs to be cleaned out before it's used, and I need to source an intake elbow for it. I removed all of the factory blower and HVAC components, which are probably never going back in. I replaced the ignition switch that we lost the key for with a new one. I removed all the frayed and superfluous wiring and put everything back together with heat shrink, proper connectors, and fuses.

Oh yeah, and we're probably gonna need to find new rear leaf springs too. A few of them are cracked or missing, and the rear axle is barely hanging on. Any suggestions on replacements?

Also planning to service the axles, t-case and transmission if anyone has opinions on fluids. Automotive tire Vehicle Tire Ingredient Recipe
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Folks here will badmouth Crown and OMIX parts because they are made offshore and primarily China. Both companies' leaf springs are made in the USA. I recommend the OMIX because they are better made. I ordered the Crown front springs and one was damaged in shipping--a story in itself--and have had to repair one since installing. Basically the doohickeys that hold the springs together are prone to break. The OMIX springs are much better made. You have to order the bushings for them and install them. Go ahead and order front and back at the same time I didn't and have light weight fronts and heavy duty rears. When I had my trusted alignment shop rebuilding the front suspension they discovered a front spring was broken under the axle and wasn't apparent with a normal inspection. I have yet to install the rears and will order matching fronts before I do, but if one breaks I'm good to go. It also appears the rears were changed by a PO so it rides fairly level.
 

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You have a lot of irons in the fire with this Jeep.

I suggest you start a build sheet that maps out:
Specific areas you want to work on.
What you want to do in those areas
And what you have done. This will keep you from missing, forgetting, or failing to finish each section.


I like to break down by components.
Example
Steereing:
Lube/adjust box
Repair loose draglink/bellcrank
Inspect tie rod ends
toe in

Front axle:
Change fluid
Bearing pack
Inspect king pin bearings
Replace knuckle wiper seals/refill knuckles
Clean breather


brakes
Engine
Transmission
T case
Clutch
Rear axle
Springs
Fuel system
etc....

It also gives you a sense of accomplishment as you tick off each task.
 
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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
You have a lot of irons in the fire with this Jeep.

I suggest you start a build sheet that maps out:
Specific areas you want to work on.
What you want to do in those areas
And what you have done. This will keep you from missing, forgetting, or failing to finish each section.

I like to break down by components.
Example
Steereing:
Lube/adjust box
Repair loose draglink/bellcrank
Inspect tie rod ends
toe in

Front axle:
Change fluid
Bearing pack
Inspect king pin bearings
Replace knuckle wiper seals/refill knuckles
Clean breather

brakes
Engine
Transmission
T case
Clutch
Rear axle
Springs
Fuel system
etc....

It also gives you a sense of accomplishment as you tick off each task.
Well this is the current work list. Font Screenshot Communication Device Software Multimedia


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I certainly didn't do it this way myself, but I would suggest moving the fluid changes up the list. Imagine putting all new brakes on it, then having to take them off to tear down an axle that you later discovered was in need of a rebuild.


Don't get me wrong... I just wanna drive mine, and I did refill my transfer case for now :laugh:, but I know i need to pull it's pan and look inside now. There was a lot of metal on the plug, and in the oil. :thumbdown: The milkshake that was the oil in my rear diff, now I know I need to keep an eye on that. Engine oil, I changed that before I even started it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
I certainly didn't do it this way myself, but I would suggest moving the fluid changes up the list. Imagine putting all new brakes on it, then having to take them off to tear down an axle that you later discovered was in need of a rebuild.

Don't get me wrong... I just wanna drive mine, and I did refill my transfer case for now , but I know i need to pull it's pan and look inside now. There was a lot of metal on the plug, and in the oil. The milkshake that was the oil in my rear diff, now I know I need to keep an eye on that. Engine oil, I changed that before I even started it.
Eh, I don't have them listed by priority. Haha but yes, all fluids and filters are gonna be done before we pull it out again!

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Folks here will badmouth Crown and OMIX parts because they are made offshore and primarily China. Both companies' leaf springs are made in the USA. I recommend the OMIX because they are better made. I ordered the Crown front springs and one was damaged in shipping--a story in itself--and have had to repair one since installing. Basically the doohickeys that hold the springs together are prone to break. The OMIX springs are much better made. You have to order the bushings for them and install them. Go ahead and order front and back at the same time I didn't and have light weight fronts and heavy duty rears. When I had my trusted alignment shop rebuilding the front suspension they discovered a front spring was broken under the axle and wasn't apparent with a normal inspection. I have yet to install the rears and will order matching fronts before I do, but if one breaks I'm good to go. It also appears the rears were changed by a PO so it rides fairly level.
So I was looking into the omix springs like you suggested, and it looks like you can order either 5 or 9 spring versions. Is that something to do with the light vs heavy duty package? Because it seems either will work.

Just for reference, here's what I'm working with. Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Car


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So I was looking into the omix springs like you suggested, and it looks like you can order either 5 or 9 spring versions. Is that something to do with the light vs heavy duty package? Because it seems either will work.

Just for reference, here's what I'm working with. View attachment 4018577

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Yes, you have to decide what you are going to put on the jeep.
I don't know what an aluminum top weighs. Probably less than another passenger.
I don't think you'll be adding a 3 point hitch to it either.

If it's just for fun and driving around a little, I'd go with the 5 spring pack.
Count the number of leaves on the spring pack now. Don't forget to count the broken ones.

I remember on my '65 I put 12 pack springs on it because I had a snow plow on it.
Nice ride when the plow was on it but without, it was a rough ride.
 

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So I was looking into the omix springs like you suggested, and it looks like you can order either 5 or 9 spring versions. Is that something to do with the light vs heavy duty package? Because it seems either will work.
CJ's are notorious for their rough rides, ECJ's especially. I suggest the lightest spring pack possible. I would also suggest a mild lift in the 2.5" range.This gives added distance between the frame and the axles, which will help eliminate that clean spot in the middle of your bump stops.

My current setup is a Rancho 2.5". I've run both a tin top as well as the current fiberglass one. It swayed a bit with the metal roof, but was acceptable. The ride is head and shoulders above the stock spring pack (9X12 leaves) and there is enough room to install 31" tires.

While you are down there, don't forget to inspect the frame around the spring hangers for cracking, which is common on pre 76 CJ's.
 
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