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I think you have a solid Jeep and (barring any surprises) should have it running in no time.

Remember:
Insure the brakes are working.
Check ALL the fluid levels
Take a moment and lube/inspect the steering bellcrank and drag link.
File/clean the points and reset.

Early CJ's are retardedly simple, which means you can fix just about anything yourself with basic tools.

Be sure to fill out your profile and continue to update it. This helps us answer your questions.
 

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I put the plugs back in and cranked but didn't get a hint of fire. Holding the coil wire close to the body I didn't get any spark, so I ordered a new coil along with a set of wires. There is a hot wire going straight from the hot terminal of the battery to the + side of the coil due to the generator being disconnected.

I removed the distributor cap and everything looked surprisingly good inside, which I was thankful for. I think if I can figure out how the distributor is clocked I'll be in good shape to test fire it with some gas down the carb.
No spark? Lets troubleshoot.......
Use a test light.

Remove the ignition wire from the coil and turn the key on.
Do you have power at the wire? If not, then you have an issue between the battery and the coil.
If so, install the wire back on the coil and remove the wire from the dist side. Do you have power at the - coil post? if not, you have a coil issue.
If so, reinstall the dist wire and open the points. Do you have power at the point arm? If not, then you have an issue between the coil and the points.
If so, then file and regap the points. You should have spark every time you open the points with your finger. If not, check the points ground and the condenser.
The dist connects to the oil pump with a beveled drive. It will only go back one way. You will need to readjust the timing once you get it stuck.
 
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We are getting waaaaaay off point.
The issue is there is no spark. Lets focus on that first.

Points are super simple. In retard language, with power flowing from the battery through the coil to the points, every time the points open, the coil fires.

There needs to be power to the + side of the coil. 12V (direct) or 9V (ballast) doesn't matter.
The points need to open and fully close when the dist shaft is rotated. Don't worry about dwell, just adjust the points to about .020. Doesn't have to be exact as long as they close fully.
The points need a clean facing surface to insure they ground when closed.
The points plate (dist) needs to be grounded.

With the system fully hooked up, you can literally crank the dist till the points close, put power to the coil, then open the points with your fingernail and get spark from the coil.

If you follow my previous post and trouble shoot the 12/9V power path from the ignition (or battery) to the points you will get spark.
Guaranteed.
 

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Mr. Oil pump is driven off of the cam.

There is a slot in the end for the distributor to be rotated

Therefore the distributor can fit in one way and 180 degrees the other way----you cannot just move the slot as with a 258 or 304

You can move the slots position by snatching the oil pump out--moving the gear and reinserting it.
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The distributor slot is offset. It can only go in one way. It can't be installed 180 off.

Once you get spark, align your timing marks at 5 degrees before TDC compression, rotate the dist with the direction of rotation till the points are closed (they may be already), rotate back against the direction of rotation till the points juuuuust crack open (you will get a spark if the ign is on), tighten the dist down (timing will be close), install the cap and pick the tower that is over the rotor blade and choose that one as the #1 cylinder.

Don't forget to insure the point gap is correct and reset the timing using a light when you are through.
 

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I don't know this system well enough to use the right nomenclature, but I cleaned the contacts where the spring point contacts the ground wire and that seemed to fix it.

There are tons of things left to address, such as brakes, leaf springs, cleaning, new wiring, and fluids.
Sent from my SM-G975U1 using Tapatalk
Mild corrosion (rust) on the contact faces is a very common issue with points, especially with ones that have been sitting open for a long time.

Pull the points and with a small file, clean the faces to get any rust and pitting off. Observe the contacts to insure they close flat. If they are off, take a small set of needle nosed pliers and bend the support till they contact flat. Reinstall and set the point gap, then the timing.

I would do this before going on to other things.

Top of my "revive" list is:
Brakes and fluids.
Nothing says "I love you dad" than backing out into the side of his car because the Jeep doesn't have any brakes......
 

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You have a lot of irons in the fire with this Jeep.

I suggest you start a build sheet that maps out:
Specific areas you want to work on.
What you want to do in those areas
And what you have done. This will keep you from missing, forgetting, or failing to finish each section.


I like to break down by components.
Example
Steereing:
Lube/adjust box
Repair loose draglink/bellcrank
Inspect tie rod ends
toe in

Front axle:
Change fluid
Bearing pack
Inspect king pin bearings
Replace knuckle wiper seals/refill knuckles
Clean breather


brakes
Engine
Transmission
T case
Clutch
Rear axle
Springs
Fuel system
etc....

It also gives you a sense of accomplishment as you tick off each task.
 
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So I was looking into the omix springs like you suggested, and it looks like you can order either 5 or 9 spring versions. Is that something to do with the light vs heavy duty package? Because it seems either will work.
CJ's are notorious for their rough rides, ECJ's especially. I suggest the lightest spring pack possible. I would also suggest a mild lift in the 2.5" range.This gives added distance between the frame and the axles, which will help eliminate that clean spot in the middle of your bump stops.

My current setup is a Rancho 2.5". I've run both a tin top as well as the current fiberglass one. It swayed a bit with the metal roof, but was acceptable. The ride is head and shoulders above the stock spring pack (9X12 leaves) and there is enough room to install 31" tires.

While you are down there, don't forget to inspect the frame around the spring hangers for cracking, which is common on pre 76 CJ's.
 
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Pict 1:
PTO
Parking brake cable missing
Output seal/shim pack leaking
Pict 3:
Broken/missing springs
I would ditch the coil over shocks. Shock mounts aren't built to carry vehicle weight and will eventually break.
Pict 4:
'Broken/missing body mount.
You will want to check the pedal pivots as they wear out over time.
Pict6:
9" non self adjusting brakes. Lots of possible upgrades there. They go hand in hand with a single master cylinder, which should be upgraded also.
I'm betting those knuckles are dry. You might want to dissemble them and inspect the bearings to insure the upper ones are serviceable. The seals should be replaced, but if they are somewhat serviceable, you can replace them (after cleaning the knuckle surface) and fill the knjuckle with a mix of grease and 90WT.
Again, I would replace those shocks.

Again, you're gonna need to replace the springs and the shocks, I would opt for the 2.5 lift.
 

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Take a hard look at the steering box. wear in the pitman shaft contact points and the bushings. The contact points will wear down or chip, causing looseness in the box. The bushings will aslo wear, allowing the shaft to rock in the housing. They should run 90WT not grease.

Also check the bellcrank. They are prone to vertical movement, equating in excessive steering slop.
Both are rebuildable, which will make the steering acceptable, but The cumulative effect of the system can make the steering seriously vague and sloppy. A conversion to a single drag link, or better, a Saginaw box on the front rail will vastly improve steering.
 

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Rear seal involves removing the yoke nut, yoke/brake drum. From there you will want to insure it is the seal leaking and not the shim pack. You can usually tell by double checking the housing bolts for tightness and observing any oil tracking. I they are tight , then inspect the yoke to insure it isn't grooved. If it is the seal, you can either pry it out or remove the housing to get the seal out.


As for the parking brake, inspect the shoes to insure they are serviceable. If they are, adjust the shoes, then attach the cable clevis to the arm. Adjust the cable and you are in.
 
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For stubborn sleeves, you can cut it with a hack saw. I like to cut a simple slot with a sawzall. That will loosen it up and then it will usually tap right out.
 
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I suggest you install the fuse box inside the cab. This keeps water and dirt from crusting up the fuses and contacts.

Pre 76 Jeeps are super simple. I suggest you find a u pick yard and see if there any vintage pickups. I used a gen I Bronco loom in mine (I was working in a Bronco specialty shop at the time) but anything before 80 will do. It will give you an integrated fuse box as well as added circuits for any additional appliances you want to add. They are simple to modify and adapt.
Oddly enough, I installed a heater box from a Bronco as well. It installed on the passenger side much like the 72 and later Jeep boxes. It blasts hot air both down on my feet as well quickly clearing the windshield and is a super upgrade from the stock unit.
 
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Front knuckles should be disassembled and the king pin bearings inspected, the old grease (if there is anything in there at all) scraped out, and the seal surfaces cleaned with solvent and emery cloth.

While the job isn't hard (and it is a good excuse to do a wheel bearing pack), it is just another thing to do. I would be prepared to have to purchase a set of wiper seals and possibly the upper and lower bearings and races. You may also have to get a set of shims for the preload. Replacing any bad bearings and races and resetting the preload on the knuckles will eliminate binding, slop, and wobble in the knuckle.

The fitting shouldn't be for grease, but a mix of grease and 90WT, making it thin enough to flow but too thick to weep out the seals. This mix lubes the axle u joints and lubes the kingpin bearings. With the advent of locking hubs, the upper bearing can get starved due to the joints not rotating, flinging the lube around inside the knuckle. I eliminated this years ago by installing a tin "seal" under the upper bearing race. This was actually one used in early Bronco open knuckle Dana 30's, but you can make one if that is the route you want to go. The lower bearing takes the weight of the vehicle and if the knuckles have been dry for a while, the bearings and races can rust, ding, or bind.
 

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Oh, as for the air cleaner, when I was a kid I remember a neighbor cleaning his (I think it was a Nash) steel wool style cleaner housing and breather cap by lighting them on fire. He rinsed them thoroughly with kerosene, drained them, then lit them off till the fire went out. You may want to double check this technique on one of the antique car forums.
 

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Dana pinion preloads are set prior to installing the seal. You should tighten the yoke sans seal. The rotational torque should be smooth with a slight drag and no end play. Don't confuse pinion preload with the pinion rotational torque including the carrier rotation. If the pinion preload isn't right, add or subtract shims till you get it. Once it is right, then install the seal.
 
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Don't forget to put a dab of grease on the seal lip.
 
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Be sure to clean the area around the shims so no grit falls behind there when you reinstall them.
Be sure to check the yoke vertical play before you move on. It isn't uncommon to get a little wear in the bearings. A touch of vertical movement will cause the new seal to leak again. If you get some, remove the thinnest shim and check again.
I'm impressed with how the carpet matches the paint, good planning there........
 
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I'm pretty satisfied with how this part turned out. View attachment 4129589

Sent from my SM-G975U1 using Tapatalk
No offense, but I despise oiled gauze style filters. They don't do a good job filtering out fine dust and servicing is a chore. I know you already purchased it, but a swap to a dry paper filter would give better results. Otherwise you may think of an impregnated foam filter sleeve over the "K&N".
 

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Nice job on bushing the pedals, by the way..........+
 
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Your brake shoes are on backwards. Short shoe in front, long shoe in back.
 
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