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I feel like we got off topic lol. But for anyone who is really worried about what to use/not use, I can put them in touch with a friend of mine that works for Milliken. They’re a textile company, and he worked on developing and later improving upon products for Chrysler. Car seat and trim fabric (both natural and synthetic) is his thing.
 
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1978 Jeep Cj5 OEM AMC 304
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No pics in 3 pages. This Jeep doesn’t exist.
 

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I feel like we got off topic lol. But for anyone who is really worried about what to use/not use, I can put them in touch with a friend of mine that works for Milliken. They’re a textile company, and he worked on developing and later improving upon products for Chrysler. Car seat and trim fabric (both natural and synthetic) is his thing.
Yeah, seat care discussions seem to turn into peeing contests, similar to oil threads, so I try to nip them in the bud. I thought you were saying the seats are not coated on higher lines and was taken back and distracted by that.

Folks often end up chasing their tail after the next best car leather cleaner or conditioner, despite these products being marketed based on outdated information and encouraged by manufactures. The interweb is full of FUD and bad information often spread by well meaning people. A lot of snake oil salesmen out there, so I'm naturally skeptical.

This is what the everyday guy or gal needs to know about Jeep leather seats:

Jeep only uses leather upholstery that is made with real leather that has a clear protective coating on it. There are different grades/types of leather in different models but it is all real leather thats coated. Think of it as the clear coating of your car paint. It is real paint with a clear protective layer. All those special car leather cleaners and conditioners are not actually touching a natural material known as leather, but are touching a synthetic coating. The ventilated seats do have holes poked through the material where products can soak in.. many reports of ruined seats in this manner.

There is routine maintenance, and there are dirty seats.

Routine vacuuming and wipe down with a damp microfiber cloth is all thats needed. If you happen to get the seats dirty, use distilled water and wipe lightly. Don’t soak.

If the seats have not been taken care of and are very dirty, well, it is best to use a multi session and very gentle approach. Don’t expect to be able to get all the dirt off at once. Try something like diluted Simple Green and use a very soft horse hair type brush to gently scrub the area. Wipe with a damp cloth. No joy, use a less diluted mix and try again and again. Still dirty, then it may be best to get a pro or manufactures specific advice for your specific situation.

Don’t use use conditioners and other similar products as they often leave a film that attracts dirt that can scratch the clear coat and soften the leather of ventilated seats. There have been several early model owners ruining their seats posting here. Some use a wax safe for the synthetic coating that make sliding in and out easier and with less wear.

But looks are a style thing and there are those that want that shine look regardless. Style is style.

These seats can take a lot of abuse.
 

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^ I agree. And keeping them clean goes a long way. Crumbs and dirt act like sandpaper
 
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
I may take a different approach on the driver's seat bottom, exactly because of the above. Same with the top of the center console.

Thanks, both of you, really appreciate the useful information all around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 · (Edited)
Just a quick update. The right front air suspension connector does have a small leak. I used some detergent in a spray bottle, and there is just a little bubbling where the hose connects to the fitting. (edit: photo coming, my phone/camera solution is archaic..) The suspension pumps up quickly which is good.

When at the front right corner with the hood up, and when the front is raising, I hear what sounds like a pop-off valve release pressure, while the air compressor motor shuts off at the same moment. Operating the raise/lower buttons in the interior work properly and it raises quickly and stops.

No funky noise out of that motor - yet - so I'm crossing fingers on it. I don't think it's on a "lot" but definitely I don't want to push my luck :)

Both front top "L" airbag connectors are getting replaced, before any serious driving happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
I'm learning a ton about QuadraLift (this place rocks) but I haven't found anyone who's tried to fix the L connector on the top of the shock mounts. Anyone try that?

A new unit is $35ish which is really nothing, just wondered if they can be taken apart and fixed. Thinking more along the lines of a field repair for the future. I'm loath to try it on mine unless I know what I'm doing, or have new ones ready to go.

I'm already familiar with rear air shock hoses/connectors that use o-rings and simple compression fittings, but these are more substantial.
 

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Nothing unusual about QL pops and pings. Sometimes when I walk by after its set for awhile it will ping, I think its saying Hi. :)

FYI, FCA did not trust field repair of hose fittings early on. They expected the entire hose to be replaced. I think they relaxed that for later models and you may find service in the later model documentation, perhaps even for the L connector.

Off hand, I dunno of a source for the O rings needed to repair them. It is a high pressure system, dunno if I'd trust a MacGyver'd approach.
 
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Discussion Starter · #49 · (Edited)
Photos of the interior, driver's/passenger's L connection & wheels; hopefully these make it intact. I'm experiencing technical issues with copying photos over from my phone (I do know what I'm doing, haha - it's some kind of Windows 10 issue that recently arose). All I can do is kind of blindly add them (they all appear as grey boxes in Explorer), then manage them afterwards.


Automotive tire Gear Gas Rim Nut
Automotive tire Tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Wheel

Brown Car Vehicle Automotive design Car seat cover
Comfort Automotive design Personal luxury car Tints and shades Vehicle door


Wheel Automotive tire Tread Hubcap Synthetic rubber

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Locking hubs Automotive design

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood Grille

Photos of the interior, driver's/passenger's L connection & wheels; hopefully these make it intact. I'm experiencing technical issues with copying photos over from my phone (I do know what I'm doing, haha - it's some kind of Windows 10 issue that recently arose
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Locking hubs Tread

).
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
These are all close up higher res photos, and they show the truth :)

The leather is a little stretched on the driver's side. It's intact though. Passenger & rear seats are like you would expect - very very nice & no rips.

I'll have this cleaned up nicely - I don't mess around. I'll try the least invasive cleaning on the seat/console panels.

If you see what I mean about the wheels, they are polished aluminum, and scratched, but not terminally.

Ended up that after moving it carefully, the passenger side showed a little leaking as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 · (Edited)
I'll continue to see if there's a repair procedure, but I 110% agree about relying on a Macgyver approach. In my case, it would likely be more MacGruber.

Actually, I'm pretty decent with ersatz field repairs, but I would much rather have something that has a better chance of making it home without incident.

Edit: best I've run across so far is this, where it looks like someone devised a schraeder valve attachment: ***

(Argh! Sorry for posting a link to a competing site! Let me know if I should edit it out)
 

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Don't worry about it, this site censors out inappropriate links. Just don't try to be clever and try to bypass it.

It has absolutely nothing to do with competition, its all about playing well with others. Your previous link to info on another site was not censored. Jeepforum has always encouraged link backs and free exchange of information. There is a good synergism with other enthusiast sites, I don't think you will find any others censored, not even Pirate's. It is a Jeep community after all.

The site you happen to reference does not play well with others and has chosen to be a spammer/marketing money grab site. This and every other Jeep site has banned them for their egregious behavior. That site censors any mention of any other Jeep site. Its unfortunate that their site's management chose an aggressive business and marketing model to the detriment of the Jeep community. But **** happens. (notice how the forum censors certain words). So be free to speak freely. When there may be an issue, words are automatically censored.

Anyway don't worry about it. Make sure to double check anything you find there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #53 · (Edited)
Thanks, and will do.

So (back to the air suspension) it looks like there might be an electronic valve & pressure sensor in the airbag area underneath the top of the L fitting? I know there's the height sensor.

The aforementioned thread says someone fitted those manual valves (and had an appropriate air compressor that did > 120psi), and was able to raise the suspension. They had to switch between the two sides, to stagger the inflation (if I'm reading it correctly) because the system was still active.

Someone with a pump or valve body failure, but good airbags, might be able to limp home using that kind of thing with the suspension at a reasonable height, if that's the case :)

Edit: I posted a question over in that thread, and will report back with any answers.
 

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The front struts have a pressure retention valve in the round portion of the fitting, similar to a tire valve. You don't want to unscrew round portion, just remove the hex portion. So you could disconnect the hose/fitting and the strut will retain pressure. Off hand, not sure about the rear.

Folks do MacGyver things when they don't understand the system.
 

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If I recall correctly, Its like a shrader valve. Install the hose, plunger pushed valve open, air flows both ways. Remove the hose, plunger closes valve air does not move either way. But that needs a fact check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 · (Edited)
That's kind of what I was thinking (in which case the valve body & pump does the lowering & nitrogen gets pumped back into the holding tank). It could have that valve in there, so that during servicing & when the hose is off, the nitrogen doesn't escape - or moist air doesn't enter the air spring.

Wondering of that other thread is incorrect about the system actually being able to stop the manual inflation. Not saying they're wrong, but I haven't found anything else so far, at least online.

When I get mine fixed, I'll post-mortem the valves & see if they are rebuildable (in a pinch) and if they have a valve like we're discussing.

Edit: I think the other thread in that other forum is not correct. Since we have a closed system, and the pressures vary in the spring as well as in the tank, there has to be an active component to get the nitrogen distributed. I'll find out and post back of course.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 · (Edited)
Ok guys, I have things planned out as far as maintenance, and I'll search for things & ask specifics in new threads if needed. I really appreciate the help and suggestions you've given me.

Everything I have to do, I can do myself, and the parts cost is reasonable if not minimal.

I have an engine sensor to replace (was known before I bought it & I have the sensor already), the ELSD motor & controller need looked at/replaced (also known & could be the connector), both climate control blend door gears to replace, and run something like Seafoam through the oil & do an oil change within the next 100-300 miles (Hemi tick - the used replacement engine probably sat for years before installed, and one of the lifters is kind of noisy, but only on startup).

Even if I have to do some upper end work eventually, it's well worth it. Very nice ride. I plan on keeping the QuadraLift intact unless/until something real expensive happens. Has the Towing IV package and QuadraDrive II and I haven't (yet) found any options it doesn't have.
 

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Edit: I think the other thread in that other forum is not correct. Since we have a closed system, and the pressures vary in the spring as well as in the tank, there has to be an active component to get the nitrogen distributed. I'll find out and post back of course.
The reversing valves are located in the compressor’s valve block. The four air springs, reservoir, compressor in, compressor out, and make up line all are individually connected to the compressor valve body. Valves in the body open and close to move air from component to component.

The following info was posted here in a couple threads years ago. I’ll repost for your convenience. I thought it was in the FAQ but must have missed it. There is also more detail scattered around here. The following words apply to early models, later models are similar although the terrain switch is connected differently.

If someone has a compressor that won’t turn off, its probably a sticky compressor relay/breaker. That Mercedes style relay/breaker has different pin outs than a std relay and inserting a std relay into the socket may blow fuses or worse.

All pressurized air suspension components contain high pressure air (up to 220 psig). Use extreme caution when inspecting for leaks. Wear safety goggles and adequate protective clothing when inspecting or servicing the air suspension system. A sudden release of air under this amount of pressure can cause possible serious or fatal injury.

Support the vehicle by supplemental means before performing any work on the air suspension system to prevent the vehicle from changing height. Before any given component is to be serviced it must be deflated. Servicing the air suspension system without supplemental support, or with pressure in the specific component, can cause possible serious or fatal injury.

General Information
The air suspension system is designed to raise and lower the vehicle height as required depending on driver request using the terrain select switch, or automatically with the terrain select switch in the Auto position. There is an Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM) located under the driver’s seat which contains the logic and controls for the system. Multiple modules work together to increase vehicle stability and traction along with vehicle ride height. The ASCM uses several Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus systems for inputs and outputs of the information necessary for the different systems to operate. The use of a scan tool is necessary for diagnostics, and replacement of any pressurized components. Height sensors on each corner of the vehicle monitor the vehicle height. The front of the vehicle is raised/lowered with two air suspension spring and shock assemblies, and the rear uses two air suspension springs.

The air suspension is a closed type system that does not draw in fresh air during vehicle lifting or leveling. Instead, it moves pressurized air back and forth between an air suspension reservoir and the four air springs as required to raise or lower a specific corner of the vehicle. The air suspension compressor assembly includes an air suspension valve block, controlled by the ASCM. The valve block isolates and actuates the raising and lowering of each pressurized component using individual air lines for the air springs and reservoir. The air suspension compressor does have a filtered air suspension hose assembly for adding air volume if a component of the system loses its air pressure and is replaced. The compressor is not intended to replenish the entire systems air volume. There is a procedure for complete system fill using an external source if it is necessary; however, this should only be necessary if the air suspension compressor or air compressor valve block is replaced.

Refilling the System If the air suspension system is fully depleted of air it can be refilled using a scan tool and Air Suspension Refill Tool - which is used with a nitrogen supply tank (can be acquired at a local gas supplier). The nitrogen must be Purity Class 5 (99.999% pure). The size and volume of the nitrogen supply tank will determine how many air suspension systems can be filled.

Changing Ride Height
Using the terrain select switch, ride height can only be changed while the air suspension system is in normal operating conditions. To change the ride height using the terrain select switch. Air suspension system normal operating conditions are as follows:

Scan tool disconnected
All doors closed
Liftgate closed
Engine running
Minimum battery voltage greater than 10.5 volts

Using a scan tool, ride height can be changed regardless of the engine state (running or not), doors or liftgate state (open or closed). The only condition necessary is that battery voltage must be greater than 10.5 volts

Ride Heights for Suspension Measurements or Adjustments When checking or performing an alignment the air suspension system must be in the manually selected "Sport" position of the terrain select switch or the Aero mode if using a scan tool. When measuring curb height, the air suspension system must be in the manually selected "Auto" position of the terrain select switch, or the Normal Ride Height (NRH) mode if using a scan tool.

Manual Control A terrain select switch is located on the console for driver control of the system. When the driver presses the terrain select switch to manually (two RH buttons) raise or lower the vehicle height the Electronic Vehicle Information Center (EVIC) displays a vehicle “up” or “down” icon and a LED indicator on the switch changes position. The EVIC displays the current position of the vehicle when it is achieved. When lowering the vehicle, the front is always first to move. When raising the vehicle, the rear is always the first to move. When the ASCM receives a command to change the vehicle more than one ride height position the action is performed in multiple steps. If request to change by two positions the rear will raise one position, then the front will raise one position, the rear again raises one position, then the front will raise to the final position. If requested to lower more than one position the same steps happen, EXCEPT the front moves first. This multi-step motion controls the angle the headlights are projected by controlling the pitch of the vehicle, keeping them from going above their normal projection plane.

There are five predetermined manual height settings; Normal Ride Height (NRH), two above and two below NRH. The predetermined vehicle heights (above or below NRH) are as follows:
Off-Road 2 (OR2), + 65 mm (2.6 in.) (Except if equipped with AMS + 56 mm [2.2 in.])
Off-Road 1 (OR1), + 33 mm (1.3 in.) (Except if equipped with AMS + 28 mm [1.1 in.])
Aero Mode, - 15 mm (0.59 in.)
Park Mode, - 40 mm (1.57 in.)

Automatic Control There are five choices for automatic control using the center rotating knob of the terrain select switch. The choices are Auto, Sport, Snow, Sand/Mud, and Rock. When the driver chooses an automatic setting multiple systems are affected for the best vehicle performance. Some of the modules whose systems use these settings are:

Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM)
Antilock Brake Module (ABS)
Automatic Headlamp Leveling Module (AHLM)
Drivetrain Control Module (DTCM)
Powertrain Control Module (PCM)
Steering Control Module (SCM)

The basics of how the different automatic settings effect the systems are listed below:

Auto - When in 4WD High range the vehicle height is at NRH. The vehicle systems are set to normal performance settings. Combines optimal traction with seamless steering feel. When in 4WD Low range the vehicle height adjusts to 38 mm (1.49 in.) above NRH, the transfer case locks, and the transmission shifting adjusts to off road shifting.

Sport - When in 4WD High range the vehicle height adjusts to 15 mm (0.59 in.) below NRH. Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and traction control tuning thresholds are raised, and the Antilock Brake Control (ABS) allows less wheel slip, all to allow more driver control. Also the transmission shifting adjusts to a higher performance shifting. Not available in 4WD Low range.

Snow - When in 4WD High range the vehicle height is at NRH. Traction control is adjusted to allow less wheel slip, and initial vehicle launch will be in second gear. When in 4WD Low range the vehicle height adjusts to 33 mm (1.3 in.) above NRH, the transfer case locks, the transmission shifting and ABS adjusts to off road settings.

Sand/Mud - When in 4WD High range the vehicle height adjusts to 38 mm (1.49 in.) above NRH. Electronic Stability Control (ESC) tuning threshold is raised, and the ABS allows less wheel slip to allow more driver control. When in 4WD Low range the vehicle height adjusts to 38 mm (1.49 in.) above NRH. The transfer case and the Electronic Limited Slip Differential (ELSD) locks, the transmission shifting and ABS adjusts to off road settings.

Rock - Not available in 4WD High range. When in 4WD Low range the vehicle height adjusts to 65 mm (2.6 in.) above NRH. The transfer case and the ELSD locks, the transmission shifting and ABS adjusts to off road settings, and hill descent control is activated for steep downhill control.


Component detail:
The air suspension compressor assembly is made up of two primary components, the compressor and the valve block. There is a single pressurized air line between the compressor and the valve block to maintain system pressure. Control of the air compressor and valve block is from the Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM). Diagnose the air suspension system using a scan tool.

Air Compressor The compressor runs to maintain air pressure any time the vehicle height is being changed or in the event of a small reduction in over all system pressure. Integrated reversing valves in the air compressor allow pressurized air to be moved in two directions, making this a closed system. There is a desiccant located inside the compressor for moisture protection, and an air suspension hose assembly attached to the air compressor with a discharge hose and an intake hose (including a filter) which are not pressurized, and can be replaced as an assembly. If water is visible in the filter, the air suspension hose assembly and the valve block must be replaced. An air suspension temperature sensor is attached to the air compressor bracket to monitor ambient air temperature for protection of the compressor.

Positive voltage is from a 40-amp fuse located in the PDC, and a normally open compressor relay (ASCM controlled) located in engine compartment area, and ground for the relay and compressor are through a bolted on eyelet connection.

Valve Block The valve block controls the flow of air in the system and to maintain the pressure in the in each air spring which allows the system to move each corner of the vehicle up or down as necessary. Valves and solenoids in the valve body increase or release pressure to air lines that connect to each pressurized component. The ASCM determines pressure from an internal pressure sensor in the valve body. The air lines connected to the valve block are labeled for individual replacement.

The valve block mechanically controls the flow of air in the system and maintains the pressure in the reservoir, and in each air spring individually. Valves and solenoids in the valve body open and close to increase or reduce pressure to air lines that connect to each pressurized component allowing the system to move each corner of the vehicle up or down as necessary. All wiring connected to the valve block is directly from the Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM) which fully controls the valve body. The ASCM determines pressure from an internal pressure sensor in the valve body.

Because the air suspension system is a closed system an air suspension reservoir is required to store a specified volume of pressurized air for use when the system need to raise or lower the vehicle height. If an individual pressurized component of the air suspension system is damaged and air pressure is lost, the reservoir will hold any pressure left in the component when a scan tool is used to evacuate the component. After repair or replacement of the component a scan tool can be used to refill the component from the reservoir. The compressor cannot refill the reservoir and complete system if all pressure is exhausted as in a compressor assembly or valve block replacement. The system will need to be filled at the reservoir using shop air.

The air suspension temperature sensor is wired to the Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM) with two wires, a signal wire and return wire. The sensor signals the ASCM of the ambient temperature in the area of the air compressor for protection against overheating.

The height sensors are wired directly to the Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM) where information is used to determine and control vehicle height. The ASCM then transmits the information on the CAN bus where it is used by the Auto Headlamp Leveling Module (AHLM). If not equipped with air suspension, but is equipped with headlamp leveling, the sensors are wired directly to the AHLM. The sensors have three wired circuits for height sensor power, signal and return.

The air suspension spring and shock assembly works the same as a coil over shock with the exception of an air bag replacing the spring to adjust vehicle height, depending on driving conditions and driver input. An air line is attached to the air suspension spring and shock assembly on the top.

When removing an air line from a component and the air line is to be reused, do not remove the 90° fitting or the brass fitting from the air line. If either is removed, the air line must be replaced. New components have air line fittings attached; however if the original air line is used the original fitting must also be used. Do not remove protective caps or plugs from air lines or components until ready to install the air line to prevent moisture or dirt intrusion. All air line fittings must be hand started to avoid cross threading

The air suspension system will auto-disable when lifted on a frame hoist, or when jacking one corner of the vehicle. The air suspension may attempt to change height slightly prior to switching to auto-disable. A manual disable is also available by pressing the “Up” and “Down” switches of the terrain select switch simultaneously for more that 5 seconds. The air suspension system will return to normal operation when the vehicle speed reaches 25 kph (15 mph).

The air suspension system will not lower if any of the doors or liftgate is open (normal operation) or the engine is not running. Doors and liftgate status are ignored when using a scan tool.

When the Air Suspension Control Module (ASCM) or any height sensor is replaced the ASCM will need to be initialized using a scan tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Thank you, this is super useful information.

I need to order two of the 90deg front shock fittings. Any part # or source suggestions, from anyone who's had success replacing those (instead of replacing the whole air line assemblies for both front shocks) would be awesome. I'll search through the forums as well.
 
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