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Not a ton of things being accomplished. I did mockup the top bar on the anti wrap and marked where to cut so I can put the helm joint in. I also sent my rear driveshaft back to Tom Wood to have it lengthened. This will be the first time I've had to modify it since I bought it 10 years ago. Luckily I was able to fit it in a USPS flat rate box and ship it for $18. Otherwise it was going to be $45.

The burn on my back is healing where I laid on the MIG welding tip so I hope to get back to it soon. Getting close now.
Ouch! I grabbed a fresh glowing rebar weld once as a teen without gloves...... had that mark for about three years. I hate burns.
 

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Yeah. I do that for all rear installs for pinion angle. Since the front has the C's and trying to maintain camber I was thinking just line them up, But weight on the springs would be best as that's how I've always done it.

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because you have hubs now Louie I wouldn't worry about your pinion angle much. I would install your spring perch such that it gives you the correct Caster angle on your inner's. If you set it up for correct caster you will save the heartache of the ineffective death wobble parts change fight later in life.:grin2:

If you want to get really neurotic like I did you can grind off the weld from the inner's to the tube and then set your pinion angle with weight on the rig then bump the inners a degree or two until your caster is correct then weld the inners back on.

For the work of one or two degrees of pinion angle I wouldn't do it again because with your hubs unlocked your drive shaft shouldn't be turning much.
 

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Sweet. Thanks Jim. Is there a good reference for setting caster?

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When I set my caster I was shooting for 7* but ended up just under at about 6.5*. At the time everything I could find in my research on caster angle and death wobble suggested that a slightly more then stock angle would eliminate it. In full discloser mode I need to say that I'm not an alignment feller and my Information came from the internet but my results have been great with no wobble in the ten years after I set the axle. I'm not running a steering stabilizer, about 1/8" of toe in and, I now run a 10,000# Warn winch up front and that weight might have decreased my caster angle a bit more.
All in all I have no problems pushing my jeep up to 80MPH when needed or running it for hours at a time. In my very layman understanding of caster I don't think you would have any problems running from 5* to 7* but if I understand what caster does correctly, a larger angle will allow the steering wheel to recenter with less effort or input then a lesser angle. A lesser angle will allow more drifting of the rig due to the wheels not being auto re-centered with as much force when driving down the road. Now in my little bird brain this would indicate that a lesser caster angle will have a tendency to engage in death wobble earlier and more violently then a greater angle (to a point) given that wheels that are being held straight with less force will have less force available to dampen any oscillations that might happen as parts were out and tires become out of balance. This is only my understanding of caster and might not be correct but it has worked for me. My jeep runs like its on rails down the road even the asphalt ruts from large trucks won't pull me side to side like before. :grin2:

https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f9/end-all-all-tj-alignment-thread-long-read-663777/
 

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A few things I found on caster.

From Firestones web sight.


What does caster do for alignment?

It's all about straight lines with caster. Take a look at a bicycle. Trust us, this is going to be the best way to understand the caster setting. Caster is the reason your bicycle steers in a straight line even after you take your hands off the handlebar. That's because the front spindle on your bicycle has a forward angle (caster) built in.

Your car's caster works in the same way. When your car travels straight down the road with little handling on your part, that's due to your caster setting. If you're driving down a straight path but start pulling to one side, that's a sign your caster is off. We'll get you all fixed up and realigned.

What does caster provide to your alignment?

Directional stability: The ability to stay on a straight course with little or no effort.
Returnability After completing a turn, your steering wheel spins back to the "straight ahead" position. You can thank the caster for that.
Do caster settings change for different types of vehicles?

Without a doubt. The caster angle is determined by your vehicle's suspension design and the intended vehicle use. If you have a high speed, high performance ride, your sports car will need more caster to handle better on the straightaway and when coming out of turns. Can we get a vrooom over here?

Can you detect a caster problem on your own?

Sometimes. The most obvious and easiest sign to detect is if you feel your vehicle pulling to one side. This may mean your alignment needs adjustment. To be sure though, bring it to us and let us take a look.

Quick Fact: Negative caster settings were more common when vehicles didn't have power steering. That may be before your time, but inquiring minds want to know.
https://blog.firestonecompleteautocare.com/alignment/alignment-settings-wheel-camber-and-caster/

From Tireracks Web site.

Caster
The caster angle identifies the forward or backward slope of a line drawn through the upper and lower steering pivot points when viewed directly from the side of the vehicle. Caster is expressed in degrees and is measured by comparing a line running through the steering system's upper and lower pivot points (typically the upper and lower ball joints of an A-arm or wishbone suspension design, or the lower ball joint and the strut tower mount of a McPherson strut design) to a line drawn perpendicular to the ground. Caster is said to be positive if the line slopes towards the rear of the vehicle at the top, and negative if the line slopes towards the front.

A very visual example of positive caster is a motorcycle's front steering forks. The forks point forward at the bottom and slope backward at the top. This rearward slope causes the front tire to remain stable when riding straight ahead and tilt towards the inside of the corner when turned.

Caster angle settings allow the vehicle manufacturer to balance steering effort, high speed stability and front end cornering effectiveness.

Increasing the amount of positive caster will increase steering effort and straight line tracking, as well as improve high speed stability and cornering effectiveness. Positive caster also increases tire lean when cornering (almost like having more negative camber) as the steering angle is increased.

What's the downside to positive caster? If the vehicle doesn't have power steering, a noticeable increase in steering effort will be felt as positive caster is increased. Other than that, the effects of positive caster are pretty much "positive," especially increasing the lean of the tire when the vehicle is cornering while returning it to a more upright position when driving straight ahead.
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=4

And of corse Wiki...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caster_angle
 

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Also in a pinch Louie if you find the Interstate battery distributor in your area they often sell "blemish" batteries with a one year warranty for cheap. It would be worth a call. For what its worth I personally have tried six times and never had a Walmart battery last more then eight months and I would never go out wheeling with one but for others they work just fine.:grin2:
 

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Before I had my hydraulic press I would use on of those Harbor Fright ball/u-joint tools that looked like a big C clamp and always had good luck with them. Such good luck in-fact that one of my friends adopted one and his dad has my other one.:grin2:
 

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My alternator seems to have quieted down and it still keeping the battery charged. I will just start collecting the tools to build my own cables and at some point buy the GC one.

I also wish I could find a square u-bolt, 5/16"-18 TPI, 1-1/2" wide. It seems only Destaco sells them and a replacement handle is $50.
It looks to me like a small trailer u-bolt Louie like one of the trailers you would get a Harbor Freight. You might try some of the online trailer supply places or tractor supply if you have one in your area and see if they have something like it.
 

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Got a hand held propane torch? Option to crimping is to solder.... some flux and solder, place the terminal lug in a vice, fill with chunks of solder, heat and then slip in the cable end... I prefer this over crimps, which can corrode and loosen...
This is how I do mine as well. The only other thing I do is tin the cable before I dunk it into the terminator.:grin2:
 
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