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Jeep 2000 TJ A/C Compressor Install

1736 Views 17 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  flyguy124
Hello there,
I am this close to finishing a much needed a/c Job which i seem to be pouring money to at this point. My question is if anyone knows what the name of the plate on the side of the compressor style is and where I can find a new one. I've managed to strip 3 of the four bolts on this plate, only removing one of the bolts which are allen heads. Without this plate being transferred to the new compressor, i simply can't finish the job, can anyone help me here?

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Follow Up

Thought i might update this and let everyone know it's resolved if anyone comes by it, but just a note. every chart I've read about my year model of Jeep states it takes 20 oz of refrigerant to fill the system. I only needed less than 12 to get proper operating pressures at my humidity, temperature, and elevation. I'm pretty sure I destroyed my last system by overcharging it (also the oil must have leaked out ) because it seized and self destructed. so unless I'm wrong about my refrigerant, 12 oz seemed to work on a 2000 4 cyl jeep wrangler, not 20 oz . Thanks for the support!
 

· R.I.P. Knuckelhead
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The internal operating pressure of the HVAC system pertaining to ambient atmospheric pressure (humidity has nothing to do with its operating capability) has no bearing pertaining to your TJ for performing cooling functions as designed... IIRC
 

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Thought i might update this and let everyone know it's resolved if anyone comes by it, but just a note. every chart I've read about my year model of Jeep states it takes 20 oz of refrigerant to fill the system. I only needed less than 12 to get proper operating pressures at my humidity, temperature, and elevation. I'm pretty sure I destroyed my last system by overcharging it (also the oil must have leaked out ) because it seized and self destructed. so unless I'm wrong about my refrigerant, 12 oz seemed to work on a 2000 4 cyl jeep wrangler, not 20 oz . Thanks for the support!
Typically the high pressure switch prevents excessive pressure so an overcharge should not damage a compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The internal operating pressure of the HVAC system pertaining to ambient atmospheric pressure (humidity has nothing to do with its operating capability) has no bearing pertaining to your TJ for performing cooling functions as designed... IIRC
I'm just quoting off the facts that I read. I have (obviously) no a/c experience but i've read these factors are something you have to keep in mind. I'll take your word for it though, the only thing that affected my pressures were the ambient temps
 

· R.I.P. Knuckelhead
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I'm just quoting off the facts that I read. I have (obviously) no a/c experience but i've read these factors are something you have to keep in mind. I'll take your word for it though, the only thing that affected my pressures were the ambient temps
The 3 things that come into play when using calculations pertaining air is temperature, atmospheric pressure and humidity. The warmer the air, the less dense it is, the less pressure it has the less dense it is. The more humid it is, the less density it has.
All these measurements are used by pilots to calculate air speed for flying an airplane.
This also applies to how well the cooling fan for the engine works. It also applies to how much air resistance your Jeep is subjected to at speed.

For every 1,000ft you go above sea-level you have approximately 3% less air pressure, less wind resistance and less fuel used because your PCM is always calculating for a balanced fuel mixture. My driveway is at 6,000ft, so that means that I have 18% less air resistance on the highway and use less fuel because the PCM is always balancing the fuel mixture... HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The 3 things that come into play when using calculations pertaining air is temperature, atmospheric pressure and humidity. The warmer the air, the less dense it is, the less pressure it has the less dense it is. The more humid it is, the less density it has.
All these measurements are used by pilots to calculate air speed for flying an airplane.
This also applies to how well the cooling fan for the engine works. It also applies to how much air resistance your Jeep is subjected to at speed.

For every 1,000ft you go above sea-level you have approximately 3% less air pressure, less wind resistance and less fuel used because your PCM is always calculating for a balanced fuel mixture. My driveway is at 6,000ft, so that means that I have 18% less air resistance on the highway and use less fuel because the PCM is always balancing the fuel mixture... HTH
I actually am a pilot so I know about all that crap, which is why it DID make sense that all those factors mattered. thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I actually am a pilot so I know about all that crap, which is why it DID make sense that all those factors mattered. thank you
Good for you and you're welcome...
Seriously, thank you xD sorry, sounded a bit passive aggresive didnt it? This is interesting to know since jobs like this can seriously push a DIY'er away. What im confused about though is where the pag oil even went if the leak was in my evaporator. Does the oil circulate through the whole system like that?
 

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Seriously, thank you xD sorry, sounded a bit passive aggresive didnt it? This is interesting to know since jobs like this can seriously push a DIY'er away. What im confused about though is where the pag oil even went if the leak was in my evaporator. Does the oil circulate through the whole system like that?
Yes, the oil does circulate with the refrigerant and can leak out with the refrigerant.
 

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Seriously, thank you xD sorry, sounded a bit passive aggresive didnt it? This is interesting to know since jobs like this can seriously push a DIY'er away. What im confused about though is where the pag oil even went if the leak was in my evaporator. Does the oil circulate through the whole system like that?
Yes, the oil does circulate with the refrigerant and can leak out with the refrigerant.
If it didn't circulate through the system it wouldn't be lubricating the compressor... ;)
 
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