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I read in the Automotive news that FCA has up to a $9000 discount on Gladiators right.now. I guess they were strong out of the gate but sales have really fallen off in the few months. Now might be the best time to get one.
Has a 2000$ rebate, 9000?? more Fake news
 

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I read in the Automotive news that FCA has up to a $9000 discount on Gladiators right.now. I guess they were strong out of the gate but sales have really fallen off in the few months. Now might be the best time to get one.
Has a 2000$ rebate, 9000?? more Fake news
Jeep is offering a 2000 dollar rebate, but the dealerships themselves are dropping prices to move product.
 

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The dealer in my area is discounting Gladiators anywhere from $3500-$5500 from MSRP and then adding in the $2000 FCA rebate. However, that $2000 is not applicable to the Rubicon.

Apparently Rubicons don't need the sales boost like Overland's and Sport's need.
 

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We did not get much snow here in north central NC but did have one storm that had significant snowfall. My close friend has a JT Rubicon that is stock and he had to come out and tow my JK home when the transfer case shift bushing decided to let go when I was shifting on the roadway. He had absolutely no problems with the 8 mile tow back to my house. He has the stock MT's on it.

It's better than most pickups but it's still a pickup with minimal weight over the rear axles. Add a few hundred pounds in the bed and it will handle well in the snow.
 

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I traded my 2012 Tacoma TRD Offroad crew cab with 193k towards my Gladiator.

The Tacoma is an excellent, reliable truck and served me very well. Highly recommend them. No problems with it at all; it did everything I wanted; practically reliable as the sunrise. I had the oil tested shortly before I got rid of it, and the engine was in excellent condition, better than average for it's mileage/age. I could have easily gotten another 100k or more out of it, as long as I could keep the rust off (New England) with continued regular washing and fluid film applications. But it's 10 years old and it will be more desirable to someone else with under 200k on it.

My reasons for getting the Gladiator instead of another Tacoma, even though I like the Tacoma styling a little better and I think it will last longer, are as follows...

- The Tacoma seating position is uncomfortable. The seat is too low to the floor for me. I raised the seat with seat jackers which really helped, but the cab height is short, so visibility and headroom got worse. I also found the pedals to be too close and steering wheel to be too far and could not be moved close enough. Overall not bad for the daily commute (30 mins. each way), but I got sore on longer drives and the idea of a road trip was out of the question. The upright seating position of the Gladiator is so much better, and the height is adjustable. Visibility is great; the A pillars block less than the Tacoma's.

- The Tacoma back seat arrangement was limiting. The Gladiator has the most backseat room of the mid-size trucks (from what I understand). I sat back there and it's much more roomy than the Tacoma. The seats can also be folded up to open the whole floor. The cargo tray below the seat can be removed to make a full flat floor. This is great for me bringing a kid on one seat and open the other for the dog to lay on the floor. Or seats can be folded down for a Tacoma-style cargo area. Much better versatility and overall use of space; a good thing for a small truck.

- Simple, old-school mechanics in the Gladiator like a sold front axle and manual shift transfer case. The solid axle arrangement is more stout in my opinion and easier to access/work on. Also slightly larger ring gears in the diffs.

- Gladiator has Ram 1500 running gear. Same auto trans with the V6 as Ram, same upgraded stronger auto trans with the diesel as in Ram (I got the diesel), and same rear suspension components. I'm a fan of full-size components in a smaller vehicle. The Gladiator feels very planted and solid (the diesel more so than gas).

- Available mechanical limited slip rear end. I don't believe the Tacoma has that option (could be wrong?), I think it's just electronic braking control to mimic LSD operation. I wanted true limited slip for slippery wet / winter roads and rough roads / trails. My old TJ Rubicon had limited slip when not locked, and the difference was definitely noticeable.

- Available diesel. I found a diesel marked down quite a bit, with all the options I wanted (or should I say not a bunch of options I didn't want). It was hard to find one that wasn't all loaded up, so this was a nice find. Nearly double the torque as the gas, and at low rpm; response is immediate. I always thought a max tow was what I wanted most, for the stout rear springs and payload, best tow capacity, and ability to add 33 inch tires without re-gearing the 4.10 axles. However, I test drove a max tow right after the diesel. I barely put my foot down and it had to gear down so the engine could rev up to get the power. It revved loud and hard, just to pick up a little speed going up a slight incline. I knew that would get annoying fast, and would be continuous if I towed something. The diesel is awesome, add a little extra pedal and it just goes, no gear-down, no screaming engine. So responsive, smooth, and quieter than the gas in my opinion. I have had a couple diesel vehicles in the past and I like how they perform.

- Longer range than the Tacoma (even for a gas Gladiator), and better fuel economy with the diesel. Depending on diesel prices though, total fuel cost can be roughly equivalent.

- It's a convertible, the doors come off, and the windshield folds down. That's awesome, no other truck does that. It will be fun for family trips to the beach, dirt roads, exploring, etc. I have an old YJ that's loads of fun off road if I want horse around and do stupid stuff. But it's just not reliable, powerful, or roomy for fun family outings, and definitely not good for a long trip. The Gladiator for me is a good compromise of light off roading/exploring, open air Jeep fun, and practicality/utility that are more useful to me most days. It could always tow the YJ if I had to. The diesel tow capacity of 6500 lb is the same as my old Tacoma, which is probably the most I have ever towed anyway, so I'm not any worse off in that department. I only want enough tow capacity for small project vehicles. I'm not into big campers or boats; if that were the case I'd get a full-size truck.

- The Gladiator can hold a full 4x8 sheet good. That is the nemesis of all small trucks (at least carrying it flat). Such a simple solution, prop the tailgate up to be even with the wheel wells! That drove me nuts carrying plywood and drywall in the Tacoma. I either had to lay it all on the tool box in the front and the tailgate (toolbox was not always in there), or I built a prop at one point to sit on the tailgate to be even with the wheel wells, which the Gladiator can do in stock form. No other small truck seems to recognize that people want to carry a few sheets of plywood every once in a while.

- You can put big tires on a Gladiator with hardly any lift or modifications. Big tires on a Tacoma gets tough with the front cab body mount right by the wheels, and needed IFS components for a larger lift. More complexity and cost to achieve the same thing.

- The Gladiator spare tire location holds up to a 35. I find that the Gladiator is catered to those who want to modify it.

- I have always loved Jeeps (have had several), and trucks. So... Jeep truck! I thought I'd be one of those guys who drove a restored old Gladiator or a Commanche, except I needed family room. Then the modern crew cab Gladiator appeared. Case closed.

I too wrestled with the Gladiator cost vs a new Tacoma, but I think they are not the same. You get more with the Gladiator; it is more versatile and fun in my opinion.
 

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I traded my 2012 Tacoma TRD Offroad crew cab with 193k towards my Gladiator. The Tacoma is an excellent, reliable truck and served me very well. Highly recommend them. No problems with it at all; it did everything I wanted; practically reliable as the sunrise. I had the oil tested shortly before I got rid of it, and the engine was in excellent condition, better than average for it's mileage/age. I could have easily gotten another 100k or more out of it, as long as I could keep the rust off (New England) with continued regular washing and fluid film applications. But it's 10 years old and it will be more desirable to someone else with under 200k on it. My reasons for getting the Gladiator instead of another Tacoma, even though I like the Tacoma styling a little better and I think it will last longer, are as follows... - The Tacoma seating position is uncomfortable. The seat is too low to the floor for me. I raised the seat with seat jackers which really helped, but the cab height is short, so visibility and headroom got worse. I also found the pedals to be too close and steering wheel to be too far and could not be moved close enough. Overall not bad for the daily commute (30 mins. each way), but I got sore on longer drives and the idea of a road trip was out of the question. The upright seating position of the Gladiator is so much better, and the height is adjustable. Visibility is great; the A pillars block less than the Tacoma's. - The Tacoma back seat arrangement was limiting. The Gladiator has the most backseat room of the mid-size trucks (from what I understand). I sat back there and it's much more roomy than the Tacoma. The seats can also be folded up to open the whole floor. The cargo tray below the seat can be removed to make a full flat floor. This is great for me bringing a kid on one seat and open the other for the dog to lay on the floor. Or seats can be folded down for a Tacoma-style cargo area. Much better versatility and overall use of space; a good thing for a small truck. - Simple, old-school mechanics in the Gladiator like a sold front axle and manual shift transfer case. The solid axle arrangement is more stout in my opinion and easier to access/work on. Also slightly larger ring gears in the diffs. - Gladiator has Ram 1500 running gear. Same auto trans with the V6 as Ram, same upgraded stronger auto trans with the diesel as in Ram (I got the diesel), and same rear suspension components. I'm a fan of full-size components in a smaller vehicle. The Gladiator feels very planted and solid (the diesel more so than gas). - Available mechanical limited slip rear end. I don't believe the Tacoma has that option (could be wrong?), I think it's just electronic braking control to mimic LSD operation. I wanted true limited slip for slippery wet / winter roads and rough roads / trails. My old TJ Rubicon had limited slip when not locked, and the difference was definitely noticeable. - Available diesel. I found a diesel marked down quite a bit, with all the options I wanted (or should I say not a bunch of options I didn't want). It was hard to find one that wasn't all loaded up, so this was a nice find. Nearly double the torque as the gas, and at low rpm; response is immediate. I always thought a max tow was what I wanted most, for the stout rear springs and payload, best tow capacity, and ability to add 33 inch tires without re-gearing the 4.10 axles. However, I test drove a max tow right after the diesel. I barely put my foot down and it had to gear down so the engine could rev up to get the power. It revved loud and hard, just to pick up a little speed going up a slight incline. I knew that would get annoying fast, and would be continuous if I towed something. The diesel is awesome, add a little extra pedal and it just goes, no gear-down, no screaming engine. So responsive, smooth, and quieter than the gas in my opinion. I have had a couple diesel vehicles in the past and I like how they perform. - Longer range than the Tacoma (even for a gas Gladiator), and better fuel economy with the diesel. Depending on diesel prices though, total fuel cost can be roughly equivalent. - It's a convertible, the doors come off, and the windshield folds down. That's awesome, no other truck does that. It will be fun for family trips to the beach, dirt roads, exploring, etc. I have an old YJ that's loads of fun off road if I want horse around and do stupid stuff. But it's just not reliable, powerful, or roomy for fun family outings, and definitely not good for a long trip. The Gladiator for me is a good compromise of light off roading/exploring, open air Jeep fun, and practicality/utility that are more useful to me most days. It could always tow the YJ if I had to. The diesel tow capacity of 6500 lb is the same as my old Tacoma, which is probably the most I have ever towed anyway, so I'm not any worse off in that department. I only want enough tow capacity for small project vehicles. I'm not into big campers or boats; if that were the case I'd get a full-size truck. - The Gladiator can hold a full 4x8 sheet good. That is the nemesis of all small trucks (at least carrying it flat). Such a simple solution, prop the tailgate up to be even with the wheel wells! That drove me nuts carrying plywood and drywall in the Tacoma. I either had to lay it all on the tool box in the front and the tailgate (toolbox was not always in there), or I built a prop at one point to sit on the tailgate to be even with the wheel wells, which the Gladiator can do in stock form. No other small truck seems to recognize that people want to carry a few sheets of plywood every once in a while. - You can put big tires on a Gladiator with hardly any lift or modifications. Big tires on a Tacoma gets tough with the front cab body mount right by the wheels, and needed IFS components for a larger lift. More complexity and cost to achieve the same thing. - The Gladiator spare tire location holds up to a 35. I find that the Gladiator is catered to those who want to modify it. - I have always loved Jeeps (have had several), and trucks. So... Jeep truck! I thought I'd be one of those guys who drove a restored old Gladiator or a Commanche, except I needed family room. Then the modern crew cab Gladiator appeared. Case closed. I too wrestled with the Gladiator cost vs a new Tacoma, but I think they are not the same. You get more with the Gladiator; it is more versatile and fun in my opinion.
Well said 👍
 
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