Jeep Enthusiast Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm perplexed with my 1984 CJ7. I could tell that it had been repainted on the exterior, but the more I tear it down the more it seems it may have been skim coated with Bondo or some other filler before painting.

The odd part is that I have pretty thoroughly checked out the underside of the body and frame and find no evidence of rust or major dings/dents from down there.

The interior paint is original and in great shape with no signs of filler or any type of damage.

Has anyone seen this done before? Why would someone skim coat the jeep if it is in otherwise great shape? Could I be missing something? Is there some way to conceal damage in a way that it can't be seen from underneath?

The underside appears to be as it was from the factory, so no hijinks appear to be going on that I can see.

I'm nearing time for a new paint job later this year and this filler really has me baffled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
Hail damage or simply someone not happy seeing the spot welds. Or it was a show jeep at once, body worked and painted accordingly.

Sent from my SM-A015A using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,103 Posts
Possibly this.........Spot welds along the lower side of the tub between wheel wells and soft top snap holes along upper rear tub area when filled are skim coated to smooth out for new paint job. Many of us purists:cool: frown on the practice but it is common.

JS
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,839 Posts
Both replies above are correct or accurate as far as I’m concerned.

Something I have personally seen when working in a body shop, many years ago. A car came in with a severe hit on one of the quarter panels. Many shops would have replaced the entire quarter panel. A process that would have required cutting, drilling and more cutting just to remove the damaged panel. The new panel would then have had to be welded in place, which is time consuming to do, it requires more cutting, trimming, fitting, welding, and more of the same until it fits the best you can get it. It is simply a lot of work, and hard to get it to fit perfectly. Had the damage been on a fender, a replacement fender would have been the best option, but this damage was on a quarter panel…Fenders bolt on, quarter panels are a permanent part of the body, Kinda like working on a CJ tub.

The guy that did this repair, worked the damaged original panel back into shape. He was very talented and he had the panel so close to original that a thin skim coat of body putty on the outside was all that it needed. The inside of the panel in the trunk got a fresh coat of trunk splatter paint. After the splatter paint was applied you could not tell there was ever any damage to it, when looking at it inside the trunk.

The point I am trying to make is, sometimes damaged sheet metal can be repaired, reshaped and then a thin skim coat applied, to get it smooth and perfect again, vice being replaced.

This method can still be considered a quality repair. The reason I say this is, no welding is required using this method. When working on the body of a car, or the “Tub” on a CJ, any welded repair wIl always be susceptible to corrosion in the future. With this in mind, anytime I can work a panel back into shape without having to cut and weld a new panel on, I will lean in this direction.

Every repair has its own unique challenge's, often resulting in different repair procedures.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,376 Posts
Not defending the practice, but if you watch ANY of the auto custom shows on TV, EVERY vehicle they paint gets a full skim coat of body filler over the ENTIRE tub prior to paint.

Now granted, they are pros, and MOST of this is sanded back off, but it is a full layer over the entire body, and a portion of it (again, in its entirety) remains

Hoss
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,124 Posts
If you want to get the paint so it is really flat and reflects the light at a constant angle, you have to level the body before the primer stage. I hope you can see the difference in these pics, of the way the light reflects on panels which have been levelled.
Wheel Car Tire Plant Vehicle

My body guy always sands the paint back, dals with rust, seals with it an epoxy primer and then skims the body and sands it back before priming to get absolutely smooth paint finish. This is the right way to do it, but the filler needs to be very thin.
Wheel Tire Vehicle Land vehicle Car

Vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Automotive tail & brake light


The J20 was taken back to bare metal as it clearly had paint reaction issues in previous paint jobs. Someone had done the bodyshopping badly and it ended at the bed bottom in 1/2" thickness and gobs and just ended. The steel underneath only had a few rust spots, it was very straight and original. this was after it was repainted, using filler again to smooth the panels.





Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Plant


Wheel Automotive parking light Tire Vehicle Land vehicle


Now my Willys had been painted (many times) but the previous effort left over 1/4" across the body, the fuel tank, everywhere. It started to lift in places!! Excessive use of filler had flatted the body but left a long term issue. the paint was just not hard, I do not know what mistake they had made with the paint mix.

It was all taken off to bare metal and redone, this time with less filler. Turned out OK, for a 70 year old body.

Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Vehicle Automotive tire
Tire Vehicle Wheel Car Land vehicle
 
  • Like
Reactions: JEEPFELLER

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I understand that show cars have this sort of thing done, or even something like covering hail damage, but neither of those seem to be the case for my Jeep. If I had to guess, this paint job was a Maaco special or something similar after the original paint was worn out. I've never seen a skim coat used like that on a cheaper paint job. Is that common?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I understand that show cars have this sort of thing done, or even something like covering hail damage, but neither of those seem to be the case for my Jeep. If I had to guess, this paint job was a Maaco special or something similar after the original paint was worn out. I've never seen a skim coat used like that on a cheaper paint job. Is that common?
Could it be the use of Clausen All-U-Need product or similar. (https://www.melomotive.com/assets/full/011-0004.jpg). It applies like primer but very high build so it can be block sanded, so like a sprayable body filler. It was pretty cheap a few years ago. I've used it on a few projects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
948 Posts
I understand that show cars have this sort of thing done, or even something like covering hail damage, but neither of those seem to be the case for my Jeep. If I had to guess, this paint job was a Maaco special or something similar after the original paint was worn out. I've never seen a skim coat used like that on a cheaper paint job. Is that common?
If it was done at even a low level "classics" or "restoration" shop then they would be used to doing that kind of work. And a jeep is a lot less real-estate than a pickup or classic car so they would easily know that they could get it done faster and cheaper than one of their regular jobs.

I could easily see a shop quoting an "our regular" price would be $$$ and it won't be more than. There's a safety margin there in this case. Plus when it's picked and paid for and it ends up being less than expected then they got a huge ad and marketing agent for free that'll tell everyone how great and affordable they are.

Skim coats are common place now a days and it's not much extra time to do it and block it down just as an insurance of sorts that they are prepping for a quality paint job that will not cause issues and be coming back.

Sent from my SM-A015A using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,068 Posts
I had my CJ repainted in 2002. The guy did a nice base coat clear coat job but did only minimum filling. The waves in the body and spot welds are more noticeable with the glossy clear coat.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top