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I just purchased a 82 cj7 with the 4.2 6 cylinder. Two quick questions, I noticed it had a hard mounted radiator fan on it, do they make one that uses a clutch that changes speed due to temperature changes or is it best to get an electric fan?

Also I am taking my hardtop off this weekend and installing a bestop bikini top and and attachment rail on top of the windshield frame. if I put the the hardtop back on can I leave the rail?

Thanks
 

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Depends on whether you have room for the fan clutch or not???

Your year might accept one, It may have come with one originally.

I have a '77 CJ-5, I wish one would fit in mine, for Inside heat purposes,

My fixed fan keeps the radiator so cool that when the stat opens, the bigtime cooler

water keeps the heater core water much cooler as it circulates in.

In other words, may heater fan cools off the this "now" even cooler water as it comes back into the block.

I for one see no reason for an electric fan---one more thing to break----will it work when it should? ETC,

With a mechanical fan, it turns with the engine running----a broken belt will kill it---BUT!!! a broken belt will Kill

the Water Pump too----mechanical or electric! You can obtain a belt faster and EZer to install than maybe a

'lectric fan.

Doing one, TO ME, is not an "UPGRADE", as it is just more troublesome to worry with.

40 years of Proven cooling capability says it all.

My '46 Willys has been mechanical for 66 years now.

If it ain't broke---don't fix it!

Hardtop?

Watch this guy at about a minute in


------JEEPFELLER
 

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Depends on whether you have room for the fan clutch or not???

Your year might accept one, It may have come with one originally.

I have a '77 CJ-5, I wish one would fit in mine, for Inside heat purposes,

My fixed fan keeps the radiator so cool that when the stat opens, the bigtime cooler

water keeps the heater core water much cooler as it circulates in.

In other words, may heater fan cools off the this "now" even cooler water as it comes back into the block.

I for one see no reason for an electric fan---one more thing to break----will it work when it should? ETC,

With a mechanical fan, it turns with the engine running----a broken belt will kill it---BUT!!! a broken belt will Kill

the Water Pump too----mechanical or electric! You can obtain a belt faster and EZer to install than maybe a

'lectric fan.

Doing one, TO ME, is not an "UPGRADE", as it is just more troublesome to worry with.

40 years of Proven cooling capability says it all.

My '46 Willys has been mechanical for 66 years now.

If it ain't broke---don't fix it!

Hardtop?

Watch this guy at about a minute in


------JEEPFELLER
Your mind is made up so I won't try to change it but I challenge you to go to dealership and find a clutch fan on anything short of a diesel. While your looking, keep your eyes open for carburetors, points, distributors, generators, drum brakes, voltage regulators, flat tappet cams, v belts, cork gaskets, rope seals, glass fuses, cloth covered wiring, 6 volt batteries, vacuum wipers, leaded fuel, brass or copper radiators, cast iron cylinder heads, manual brakes, manual steering and probably more that I can't think of.

Your next challenge would be to ask how any of those items above would improve a vehicle to install those items instead of fuel injection, disc brakes, electric wipers etc.

Your final challenge would be to pull your wife's vehicle into the garage and start removing all of the "troublesome upgrades".

Go right ahead....

I will politely remind you that you are apparently the man when it comes to plumbing. No disrespect is meant by this but those troublesome upgrades in the kitchen and bathroom can be replaced by a bucket and a hole in the ground.
 
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Why do people neuter their 82 through 86 CJ?

Those Jeeps were upgraded during those years!

People get all those upgrades that you mentioned when they buy a JK for $45,000 or more.

I already did my time riding the short bus I can't afford one now anyway

----JEEPFELLER
 

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Why do people neuter their 82 through 86 CJ?

To eliminate the trouble-prone, power robbing, emissions systems that were bandaid fixes to appease the EPA, and were definitely not upgrades. But, I think you know that, and are just being stubborn and argumentative, as usual.

Matt
 

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to the OP - what type of fan to use depends partly on what you will be doing in your Jeep. If it's mostly road driven I think a clutch fan would be more than enough. My 304 has a stock clutch fan and it's kept it cool on even the hottest Midwest summer days. If you're going to be doing a lot of offroading or rock crawling where you might be inching forward a few feet at a time in hot weather, you might consider an electric fan running off an engine temperature switch.
 

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Early in my career as a CJ owner I had an oops and bent the fender and pushed it into the grill which ruined a radiator and the bent the OEM fan. I replaced the mechanical fan with an thermostatically controlled electric one. I had it set to come on at about 230*. The 74 TSM calls for the 258 to use a 205* thermostat fully opening at 228* thus a 230* setting. It failed on me and I didn't realize it until I got caught in some road work in the mountains. Once I got rolling again it cooled down and normal air flow kept it cool. I found that unless I am sitting still or in heavy traffic, I don't need a fan.

I had ordered a 5-blade nylon fan when I ordered the new radiator but couldn't use it because the blades hit various and assorted engine parts, and it was hanging on a nail. I trimmed it marking it with masking tape and cut it with shop scissors. I didn't vibrate and it cooled the CJ in heavy traffic. Works well off road too.

The last time I had the radiator off I replaced the electric fan under LLW and wired it to the unused fan relay in the aftermarket fuse block and toggle switched it to the ground per harness instructions. It is strictly a backup. I've used it one time and that was in last year's Veteran Day parade. I also have an aftermarket temperature gauge which gives me readings in degrees and not H & C. I use a 4.0 thermostat housing which has a place for the temperature gauge sensor, so I measure the water temperature as it leaves the engine and enters the block.

Stay cool my friends!
 

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That Video is a great demonstration on what happens when you install your tailgate hinges upside down…the tailgate sits too high in the front, and is not level with the tub floor. That’s why his tailgate is angled or tilted down toward the rear, it is sitting too high in the front. When installed correctly the tailgate will be flat, and line up with the tub floor.

I’ll post a picture of my tailgate that has probably never been removed, and it sits level with the tub floor. If I had removed and reinstalled the tailgate, I would probably have installed the hinges upside down myself, it’s an easy mistake. Once you open the tailgate and see it’s on an angle, that should be a dead giveaway something is wrong, and result in correcting the mistake, unless you want to tailgate to be crooked.

In the video he calls the ratchet a wrench, and the 5/16 bolt a 1/2” bolt. A 5/16-18 hex bolt fits a 1/2” wrench or socket, hence the mixup on the bolt size, but I don’t know why he calls the ratchet a wrench?

I wouldn’t suggest using an electric ratchet or drill to tighten the screws that engage in the sheet metal, they will strip easily, even if you have the torque setting on low like he did. I trust my hand for that kind of stuff.

I believe the top weighs closer to a hundred pounds than two hundred, but that isjust a guess. I used to install my hardtop alone when I was younger, but I don’t now. One wrong move and you might drop it, and damage it, so I find someone to help me or use a hoist.

My CJ-7 came with a 258 & heavy duty cooling system, which means it had a clutch fan. I replaced the clutch mechanism when I replaced the 258 with a 4.0 based 294 CID inline six.

My new engine makes more than twice the power of the old 258…does that count as being neutered? I think not.




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Axe, I noticed some of the same things when I watched that video. I actually made the hinge mistake when I re-assembled my tub after restoring it. I realized my mistake the first time I lowered the tailgate and it was angled just like the guy's in the video.

I'm not sure why he's afraid to step on his tailgate. I'm pushing 260# and I step on mine all the time.

And, yeah, the hardtop is no where near 200 pounds. I've wrestled mine on and off many times by myself. Now, I have a hoist in my garage that make easy work of it. But, as I've aged, the novelty of rolling around topless just doesn't do much for me any more, so my hardtop stays on year round.

Matt
 

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I noticed it had a hard mounted radiator fan on it, do they make one that uses a clutch that changes speed due to temperature changes or is it best to get an electric fan?
The only requirement to install a clutch fan is clearance between the fan and the radiator. The water pump will take the clutch assembly or a fixed fan. Personally, I feel clutch fans are the best of both worlds. Inside the radiator, variable cooling, and, if one malfunctions, the engine doesn't overheat. They simply need a wiggling once in a while to insure the bearing isn't going bad.

internally mounted electric fans have one advantage over mechanical fans and that is you can wire them to be turned off manually. This is a huge plus when crossing water. Otherwise, they are a viable alternative to a mechanical fan and there are a number of writeups on converting a Taurus fan assembly into a CJ. The only thing I wouldn't contemplate is a fan mounted in front of the radiator. I don't like the vulnerability of debris being sucked into the fan damaging it.
 

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I was looking a few days ago, and I saw where the [factory] CJ-7 hard top weighs-in at 155lbs, and the YJ top weighs-in around 148. I was wondering what those numbers were as I was thinking about what size mini-winch I'd need to power my hard top hoist.

I did the very same thing a few times as the guy in the video did a LONG time ago when I was a lot skinnier and... care-free... about doing such things... and wound up with some new 'patina' on both the Jeep and its top after each time. Get a friend or a hoist. I currently have a T-bar hoist affixed to my garage ceiling with a massive eyelet screw (into a ceiling joist) and a come-a-long anchored to the wall. It works, but is a PITA to line up side-to-side, and I'm not keen on having the exhaust fumes cavitating from backing the Jeep in to use the hoist. My plan, after getting the Jeep running (hopefully, within the next week or so) will be to build a new hoist system that I can use in the carport, since my wife wants her car back in the garage once the Jeep's operational again.

I also am a believer in the clutch fan with shrouds over electric fans. The most convincing case in my fleet was my '97 Ram 1500 5.2L V8. I wanted to improve the cooling, so I removed the clutch fan and went with a double electric 'puller' set-up that was thermostatically controlled (but had an adjustable temperature potentiometer, set to come on around 210). I left the full clutch-fan shroud on to help keep the air flowing toward the engine, but that dual fan set-up did not work as well as the factory clutch fan - it worked as advertised, and came on as it was supposed to, but just didn't ever seem to cool things down (always ran when it finally came on, and the temp gauge seemed to fluctuate between 195 & 225, when moving and stopped, respectively). So, I put the clutch fan back on (but left the electrics in-place as auxiliary fans, since they were a PITA to install) and set the thermo-switch up to 230... and they never came on again.

My factory clutch fan on the 258 worked great even without a shroud, and only starting showing any issues of struggling when I put a Warn 8274 in front of the grille. If I would've had a shroud, that might not have been the case... so, I guess we'll see when I put the 304's clutch fan on with the new factory-style shroud here in a few days.
 

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Mister, I have a mechanical fan and clutch on my 360. I also installed a 3-row aluminum radiator. Initially I had no shroud, and occasionally my temps would creep to around 220. Since installing a shroud, the temps rarely get higher than the 195 t-stat rating. I also have a 8274 on the front of my CJ.

Matt
 

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Mister, I have a mechanical fan and clutch on my 360. I also installed a 3-row aluminum radiator. Initially I had no shroud, and occasionally my temps would creep to around 220. Since installing a shroud, the temps rarely get higher than the 195 t-stat rating. I also have a 8274 on the front of my CJ.

Matt
Nice! I appreciate that info - looking forward to [hopefully] the same with mine. Thanks!
 

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Thermoclutch fan (newish) and shroud will help you cool whilst not robbing too much power.

Last time I bought one I spent a long time looking at clutches and lengths and percentage transmission etc. There are a lot of clutches which will fit the very basic 4 bolt arrangement. In the end I bought the wrong one, it was no different to my old one but new. And new is better than old as they wear over the years and you do not end up with as much power transmission.
 

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The only requirement to install a clutch fan is clearance between the fan and the radiator. The water pump will take the clutch assembly or a fixed fan. Personally, I feel clutch fans are the best of both worlds. Inside the radiator, variable cooling, and, if one malfunctions, the engine doesn't overheat. They simply need a wiggling once in a while to insure the bearing isn't going bad.

internally mounted electric fans have one advantage over mechanical fans and that is you can wire them to be turned off manually. This is a huge plus when crossing water. Otherwise, they are a viable alternative to a mechanical fan and there are a number of writeups on converting a Taurus fan assembly into a CJ. The only thing I wouldn't contemplate is a fan mounted in front of the radiator. I don't like the vulnerability of debris being sucked into the fan damaging it.
Since they all came from the factory with fan clutches, I can't imagine a proper OE fan clutch assembly and shroud not working better than an electric fan set-up. The OE components should all fit and work together without issues, as that's how they were designed. Can they be improved upon? Of course, but there will be other factors to consider during that process (a thicker core radiator might prevent the clutch fan from fitting properly, for instance).

The vast majority of electric fan kits do not have full shrouds - just the round part around the fan blades, which doesn't take advantage of the entire cooling surface of the radiator, leaving hot spots upstream of the fans due to lower airflow volume (especially, when sitting still). A clutch fan and shroud pull ALL of the air through the radiator cooling fins, which works out to "more area = more/better heat transfer = better cooling.

I'd thought about trying a Taurus fan, and even picked one up from a local salvage yard. Then other things came up and because the Jeep was running well enough at the time, I lost track of where the Taurus fan wound up. I'm pretty sure it was in my pal Jim's garage with all his other vast collection of Jeep and car parts, and was subsequently and unceremoniously cleaned out after he passed and the kids inherited the house.

One key thing about the Taurus fan set-up is that it's a dual fan unit with a full shroud that fits the OE CJ radiator almost perfectly. Wiring it up is a bit of a PITA, but easily doable.

The idea of having a master cut-off switch for the fans for water crossings is also an excellent idea, and probably the biggest benefit to having an electric fan set-up, IMHO... unless, it's a properly engineered system that actually does work better than properly functioning OE equipment and fitment is a consideration.
 
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