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Essential Tools for Off-Roading Jeep Adventure

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Off-roading is a fundamental part of life in a Jeep. Off-roading is the purest thrill of Jeep ownership, but it’s not something you can go into unprepared. To ensure every off-roading adventure is as successful and exciting as possible, it’s important to bring along a few essential items.

First Aid Kit

If you find yourself in trouble, basic tools may be enough to get you out. Make sure to equip yourself with a tool kit, a flashlight, safety glasses & gloves, and all the other essentials. Leave some space for duct tape and jumper cables, too.

Hand Tools


Hand tool Product Tool Font Ratchet


You’ll want a comprehensive selection of wrenches, drivers, pliers, and all that good stuff. Even if you don’t intend to work on your car during a trip, the vibrations and bumps can rattle stuff lose easily. Having a toolkit along will empower you to deal with problems as they arise.

Spare Tire

Jeep tires are built to take some bumps and bruises, but even that sturdy construction can meet its match against some of the terrains you take on. With off-roading terrain, you never know how much damage your tire may endure. Always have a spare tire in case you, or someone in your group, need to do a quick switch. Those spares on the back aren’t just decorations—they can really bail you out.

Food&Water

Regardless of your off-road destination, don’t forget to pack food and water. We all go out with the intention of “let’s just go out for a few hours,” — but we always end up out longer than anticipated.

Water doesn’t go bad, so you can always stock up and save some for later. This is more about basic water and healthy snacks, especially in arid climates that attract off-roading, which is integral to staying lucid and alert, Water can be used for cleaning wounds, drinking, boiling for sterilization, and cooking.

So make sure you are prepared with food, snacks, and water. Plus, if you are unable to get back, or someone has dietary needs, it’s important to have these supplies stocked up.

Warm Clothes & Blankets

When you are out in the woods with all kinds of terrain, you never know how the weather conditions can change. It’s always a good idea to pack blankets or sleeping bags and a pillow, just in case you have to stay out overnight due to a mechanical failure. Who knows, you may just feel like living in the moment and sleeping under the stars.

Regardless of where your adventure takes you, to ensure a safe, enthralling off-roading trip, be sure to prepare ahead of time and pack smartly. Your fellow wheelers will thank you.
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I think^^^that is an advertisement

To me one of the critical items for venturing into the wilderness is using a vehicle prepared to traverse the rigors of the environment and get past obstacles mechanically intact. A liberty is an ok car I guess but I wouldn’t want to drive one someplace that not getting back would be life or health threatening.
 

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Liberty's brake-lock differential makes it pretty capable in poor traction scenarios, but it's easier to modify a wrangler to get a higher breakover angle than you'll eke out of a Liberty.
 

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Liberty's brake-lock differential makes it pretty capable in poor traction scenarios
I’ll disagree with you on that. No disrespect to you, but my issued company car (2021 Rogue) could get permanently anchored in place on wet grass or fresh, sticky snow. Friend had a liberty- same thing. And lurch over rocks it even had clearance to traverse.

Never mind when my rogue slid almost a quarter mile down the North Wolcott Road last February. Ice under sticky snow. Brakes couldn’t figure out what to do but I came to a modicum of a skidding stop stepping on the pedal fast and hard and hitting the ebrake. It was out of control and 30mph from 15mph before I could figure out what’s up.

No electronic baloney on an ‘89 YJ- it might’ve been dicey but I know how to drive with brakes that don’t stop you from using them.
 

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Carry a sturdy jack and a board to put under it, NOT the flimsy one that comes with the vehicle. You may need to jack up on uneven or soft surfaces. Bring the factory jack too, but use only it to stabilize the vehicle. Doesn't need to be fancy, I carry a mid size bottle jack with a metal plate attached for stability. Also a length of 6x6 wood if I need more lift]

[Hi lift jacks are more show that go. They are useful under some circumstances, but I would not consider one as the main tire changing jack. Watch some videos about proper use of them, or else you can get into trouble. I once saw an inexperienced guy trying to use one to help another driver, the Jeep fell off the jack. No one got hurt, but the Jeep was damaged]
 
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I often see people out - wheelin with no tools at all and no way to change out a battery terminal in case their warn gets knocked loose and I think to my self "man what a wild time I bet they dont even go wheelin"
 

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OK, i'm old. Wait, maybe ancient. Been off roading it since I received my driver's licence and that was 1959. My wife and I also usually end up soloing it. So what you need for trail gear depends on a number of things, perhaps the most important being the actual vehicle, where you are headed, and the intended stay. Not much use for a chainsaw in the middle of the Atacama. So what do I carry in the decidedly non stock Willys 3B (which has OBA, a welder, a winch, along with nary a single metric bolt)? You will also note there are NO chinese tools. The only difference between no tool on the trail and a broken one is the money and tool storage space wasted on the latter.

Tools:
¼ drive socket set
; Fine tooth ratchet, breaker bar, 1 ½ and 3” extensions, 6 pt sockets 5/32 through 9/16 (Craftsman, Proto and SK)

3/8 drive socket set; Ratchet, breaker bar and 3 & 6” extensions, universal, 5/8 spark plug socket, 3/8 x ¼ adapter, 1/8 through 3/8 ball tip hex drive sockets, 3/8 through 1” 12 point sockets, 3/8 to ½ adapter

1/2 drive; flex handle and 1 1/8" socket for yoke nuts.

Wrenches: ¼ through 1” combination wrench set, 6 and 10” adjustable wrenches

Pliers: 10” groove joint, 6.5” slip joint, 6.5” needle nose, 5” diagonal cutters, Visegrip 4LN, 7WR, & 10WR.

Screw drivers: Combination screw driver (3/16 x ¼ flat blades, #2 x #3 phillips), Yankee flat blade ratchet, General #1 x #2 phillips ratchet

MISCELLANEOUS TOOLS: Tire stem tool, wire strippers/crimpers, ball end Allen key set (.050-3/8), 12 oz ball pein hammer, 3 lb engineer’s hammer, adj hacksaw frame with high speed blades, multi tool with insert bits, Weather Pack terminal tool

MISCELLANEOUS: three 1” ratchet straps, Crosby 2” web clevis, ProComp 30’ 7k recovery strap, Tmax 8k kg snatch block, Mil surplus tree strap, set tire deflators, air chuck, blow gun, 25’ Coilhose air hose, tire gauge, Mil surplus waterproof match container/matches, Maglite 3D cell flashlight (LED converted), light and heavy leather gloves, 25’ 12 ga extension cord, Milwaukee 4 ½” magnum grinder, 4 extra grinding discs, welding mask, welding gloves, 50’ #1-0 welding cable (“positive” cable has quick connect end for stinger or clamp so can double as jumper cables).

SUPPLIES/PARTS: WD40, high temp RTV, Right Stuff RTV, qt oil, qt 85-140 gear lube, qt power steering fluid, qt brake fluid, Gorilla super glue, blue thread locker, JB weld, can Gojo, roll paper towels, roll toilet paper, six 30 gal trash bags, four 36” “wire ties”, approx 40 4 to 8” wire ties, roll 3M electrical tape, roll duct tape, roll Gorilla tape, roll mechanics wire, hose clamps (one #400, two #236, two #72, two #32, one #28, one #24, two #20, one #16, one # 12), line cap assortment, ten’ 3/8 fuel line, 15’ ¼” high pressure nylon line with approx 15 adapter fittings to adapt to invert flare and 1/8-1/4” NPT), Allen head cap screws (10-32 through 3/8, up to 4” long, 2 each), Nylock nuts (#8 to ½” NF and NC, six each), wire terminals/splices (10-12, 14-16, and 18-20; GM spade, Weather Pack; about 6 each), extra fuses (ATM), complete set of new V-belts, 2 lbs each 1/8” 6011, 6013, 7014, and 7018 welding rod, two 27 spline drive flanges, Tera Low 26 tooth main drive gear/nut/D18 “PTO” cover (to replace the Warn overdrive when I finally blow it up), new regulator for the Premier Power Welder alternator, and a new Walbro EFI fuel pump.

GENERAL: Double bit ax, mil surplus trenching tool, stock jack and lug wrench, 20T bottle jack, jerry can spout, two fire extinguishers (First Alert, 10BC), small and large first aid kits, space blanket, box alcohol wipes, can/bottle opener, matches, bottle 100% DEET, spray can 40% DEET, assortment of bungee cords, Gempler’s tire repair kit. And depending on where I am wheeling, a Stihl chainsaw.


We always have either day packs or regular backpacks that contain good rain suits and down or fleece jackets. The backpacks are our regular backpack gear good for a relatively comfortable existence just about anywhere for a week. All this stuff in a space deprived flat fendered Willys CJ 3B. The JK list is similar metric version. In 63 years of this, I have never failed to get back home on my own but if I drive the JK a few more years I could see that status change. The electronics/wiring in that vehicle have sucked big time from the day we bought it new and no amount of time/$ thrown at it seems to find a permanent cure.
 
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