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Monitor rediness

OPERATION

The following procedure has been established to assist technicians in the field with enabling and running OBD II Monitors. The order listed in the following procedure is intended to allow the technician to effectively complete each monitor and to set the CARB Readiness Status in the least time possible.

NOTE:
Once the monitor run process has begun, do not turn off the ignition. By turning the ignition key off, monitor enabling conditions will be lost. EVAP Monitor runs after key off. By performing a Battery Disconnect, or Selecting Erase DTCs, the CARB Readiness and all additional OBD II information will be cleared.

Monitor Preliminary Checks:

1. Plug a scan tool into the vehicle's Data Link Connector (DLC).

2. Turn the ignition, KEY ON - ENGINE OFF. Watch for the MIL lamp illumination during the bulb check. MIL lamp must illuminate, if not, repair MIL lamp.

3. Using a scan tool check for Powertrain related DTCs.

•Verify that No Emissions Related DTCs are Present. If an Emissions DTC is Present, the OBD II Monitors may not run and the CARB Readiness will not update.
•The Emissions related DTC, will need to be repaired, then cleared. By clearing DTCs, the OBD Monitors will need to be run and completed to set the CARB Readiness Status.

Using the scan tool check the CARB Readiness Status.

Do all the CARB Readiness Status Locations read YES?

•YES - all monitors have been completed and this vehicle is ready to be I/M or Emission Tested.
•NO - then the following procedure needs to be followed to run/complete all available monitors.

NOTE:
Only the monitors, which are not YES in the CARB Readiness Status, need to be completed. Specific criteria need to be met for each monitor. The most efficient order to run the monitors has been outlined below, including suggestions to aid the process.

Evaporative Emission System Leak Detection with Purge Monitor

This monitor requires a cool down cycle, usually an overnight soak for at least 8 hours without the engine running. The ambient temperature must decrease overnight - parking the vehicle outside is advised. To run this test the fuel level must be between 15-85% full. Criteria for EVAP monitor:

•Engine off time greater than one hour .
•Fuel Level between 15% and 85%.
•Start Up ECT and IAT within 10°C (18°F).
•Vehicle started and run until Purge Monitor reports a result.

NOTE: If the vehicle does not report a result and the conditions where correct. It may take up to two weeks to fail the small leak monitor. DO NOT use this test to attempt to determine a fault. Use the appropriate service information procedure for finding a small leak. If there are no faults and the conditions are correct this test will run and report a pass. Note the Small leak test can find leaks less than 10 thousands of an inch. If a small leak is present it takes approximately one week of normal driving to report a failure.

Catalyst / O2 Monitor

The Catalyst and O2 Monitor information are acquired and processed at the same time. Most vehicles will need to be driven at highway speed (less than 50 mph) (73km/h) for a few minutes. Some vehicles run the monitor at idle in drive. If the vehicle is equipped with a manual transmission, using 4th gear may assist in meeting the monitor running criteria.

•Engine RPM between 1200 to 3000.
•Enginetemperature greater than 70°C (158°F)
•Engine run time greater than 92 seconds
•MAP between 10 - 20 kPa (7.5 - 15 Hg)
•Vehicle speed between 20 - 70 mph (29-103 km/h)

EGR Monitor

After the vehicle has reached the below conditions and during a throttle decel the EGR monitor will run.

•Engine RPM between 1375 - 2500
•Engine temperature greater than 70°C (158°F)
•Engine run time greater than 125 seconds
•Vehicle speed between 25 - 70 mph (37-103 km/h)

O2 Sensor Heater Monitor

This monitor is now continuously running once the heaters are energized. Pass information will be processed at power down.

Mis-Fire Monitor

The Misfire Monitor is a continuous two-trip monitor. The monitor uses two different tests/counters:

NOTE: The Adaptive Numerator must be learned before the PCM will run the Mis-Fire Monitor. The PCM updates the Adaptive Numerator at every key-ON, and is relearned after battery disconnect. The Misfire Monitor will not run until the Adaptive Numerator has updated since the last battery disconnect. If the Adaptive Numerator is equal to the default value then the PCM knows that the Adaptive Numerator has not been learned and does not permit the Misfire Monitor to run. If the Adaptive Numerator exceeds a calibrated percentage, the PCM sets a DTC for CKP NOT LEARNED and illuminates the MIL.

•200 Revolution Counter - Looks for misfire that can cause immediate catalyst damage.
•1000 Revolution Counter - Looks for misfire that can cause emissions to increase 1.5 times the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) standards. This test must also identify misfire percentages that might cause a "durability demonstration vehicle" to fail an Inspection and Maintenance Program tailpipe emissions test.
 

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Pour a can of seafoam in the next tankful and then a bottle of Chevron Techron in the next tankful.

Then Put new NTK O2 sensors in it, upstream and downstream. They do go bad.
 

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Do these kits include a way to measure boost? That will help prevent issues down the line... seeing a sudden drop in pressure over what was consistent would indicate a leak like above.
I use the GlowShift Boost Gauge and Oil Pressure Gauge.
AeroForce has a gauge that plugs into the Diagnotics port under the dash panel and it tells you a lot of information.

 

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I know this is a very old thread. But just to add to the knowledge base here. I work at a custom Jeep shop and we have a customer with the exact same issue on the exact same RIPP setup. Bank 1 and 2 lean codes. Only difference being it has the stock exhaust manifolds.
I watched the O2 up and downstream with my scan tool and the fronts swing as they should. The LT fuel trims were very rich trying to address the lean condition. I reset the LT fuel trims and let it idle and it would be normal and then slowly LT would go richer and richer until it would throw the lean codes.

We ended up bypassing the supercharger and I replaced upper and lower intake gaskets and swapped back to stock injectors. Now the codes are gone and it runs well but we cannot get the O2 monitor to run.

RIPP advises to do an resistance test on the sensors and if below 10 then replace. I assume they meant the heater circuit, which makes no sense to me as the heater circuit has its own monitor and it is complete. I checked anyways and got ~4 ohms on all 4 sensors at around 80-90 degrees F. Now at around 67 degrees they are all reading 3.8-4. I checked another JK 3.6 we have at the shop and it’s sensors read the same and that Jeep has no codes, runs fine, and all monitors are set. So to me they check out as fine. The only thing left to test is the signal circuit with a propane test or something similar. Pulled the sensors and they aren’t chalky or overly sooty.

Once I get this resolved I will try to add the answer here. Hoping someone here maybe has some insight, if not just adding my experience to the pot because it is HARD to find any answers on the internet.


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I'm the originator of the thread. Different name as I was away from the forum for a long time and moved to China, Cambodia and now moved to the Philippines actually. I just bought a 2015 with roughly 25000 kilometers on it.
I still follow this thread as I never did find the issue and eventually sold the Jeep from NH to someone down south central USA...Kentucky or Tennessee as I recall.
I'd still be curious to know if you fix it and if so where are you? Is it possible it is the same Jeep?

Thanks,
V
 

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Never ended up fixing it. We’re in Georgia. One day the state emissions computer systems were down and you didn’t need the test to get your tags so he got his tags that way. I reinstalled the Ford injectors he had in there and re-installed the supercharger and sent him on his way with a tune straight from RIPP. Drove fine and fuel trims were good when it left but the O2 monitor still never ran. I’d love to know the fix because it’s common enough that our shop has seen it multiple times and haven’t found a fix.

As far as it being the same Jeep. I doubt it. Our shop installed this supercharger a year or more ago.


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