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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still going down the rabbit hole of 'one thing leads to another' repair work. Maybe a frame-off resto would have been faster :LOL:

I've got the bulk of the rot cut out of the driver side rear floor pan area and before I go installing my new patch panels, I stared down at these rusty 40 year-old fuel lines and figure this is the best opportunity I will have to replace them with the additional access I have for the time being.

It looks like I'm dealing with 3 lines for fuel and one brake line. On the fuel side I believe there is a supply line, return line, and a vapor line. I found these in stainless steel from Classic Tube, but for a pretty penny when pre-bent (Classic Tube JEF1023-SS Fuel Supply Line for 76-81 Jeep CJ-7 with 8cyl). They are all $80 which is a heck of a lot more than I wanted to spend. I can also get a bulk 20' of stainless fuel line from Jegs for $80. So my question to the group is are the pre-bent lines worth the expense? I'm set on stainless but can't find any other suppliers who offer pre-bent lines for CJ's.

TIA

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I used the classic tube and it fits like a glove. It is worth every penny. I still have the rolls I was going to use lol.Brake lines are a bit easier to manipulate because of the size but the fuel line is a ***** to get right.
If you have the money buy them. You will save yourself alot of anger.
 

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Yes a frame off might be easier. Safer too, I've got a story for that sometime. Were it me I'd get the pre bent lines and brake lines too. It's easy to bend fuel line with the tub off but not so much with it on.

Hey Rob, take a look at this 1986 CJ7 - cars & trucks - by owner - vehicle automotive sale In your neck of the woods, isn't it?
 

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Reactions: Jim1611

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, sounds like pre-bent is the way to go and honestly I’m not surprised to hear that. I just didn’t want to spend $250 on fuel lines. Ouch!

@Jim1611 that’s a good looking CJ! It’s about a 25 minute drive from me. Want me to look at it for you? Happy to do that.

After being a forum member for a number of years here, I find myself paying attention to tailgate hinges all the time now 😂
 

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Thanks guys, sounds like pre-bent is the way to go and honestly I’m not surprised to hear that. I just didn’t want to spend $250 on fuel lines. Ouch!

@Jim1611 that’s a good looking CJ! It’s about a 25 minute drive from me. Want me to look at it for you? Happy to do that.

After being a forum member for a number of years here, I find myself paying attention to tailgate hinges all the time now 😂
If I were looking for a CJ I'd sure consider it but mine is serving me well and I sure don't need another. I do like that red color though! Also we excel at spending everyone else's money on here so it's easy to suggest you buy the pre bent stuff (y)
 

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The other things to think about when bending your own is the straightening, bending and flaring. Stainless can be tricky, and what you're cutting it with could work harden where you'd be flaring it. I've tried to flare allegedly annealed stainless line and must have split 5 or so flares before I got it to work. Then trashed that idea and went with NiCopp lines. It would be a bummer to get some nice bends in a pricey length of tubing, only to trash the end when you flare it. When I run new (larger) lines for my Sniper install, I'll also use NiCopp (Copper/Nickel). Did my CJ7 brakes with it and it's a breeze to work with.

So, in my instance, purchasing the flaring tool, all the flare nuts, the coil of tubing (or 2), and the spring wrap was WAY more than the pre-bent stainless lines from inline tube. Not to mention the few times I put a nut on backwards, or forgot it, or cut the line too short, or had to re-bend it, or...

Once I covered my brake lines with the spring wrap (stainless), you really can't tell that it's NiCopp underneath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've heard great things about the NiCopp tubing but haven't tried it yet.
Good point about the Sniper install... for me I am planning a MPFI upgrade at some point in the future. I wonder if either the throttle body FI or MPFI require a larger diameter feed line?
 

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I think Holley "recommends" 3/8 for for both. Because the stock lines are 5/16 supply and 1/4 return, I'm replacing both and I'm thinking of running both up the right side too.
 

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I put NiCopp (Copper/Nickel) brake lines in my CJ7 back in 2013 when not as many people knew about them. I used stainless steel spiral rock guard around the lines for extra protection. They are wonderful to work with and you can hand bend them or bend them around a round can or barrel.

A Titan brand flaring tool will make your life much easier. The same tool is sold by several companies including Eastwood and Lisle. They make an excellent double flare in 3/16 (only size they do so brake only) and they work in tight spots.



 

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Thanks guys, sounds like pre-bent is the way to go and honestly I’m not surprised to hear that. I just didn’t want to spend $250 on fuel lines. Ouch!

After being a forum member for a number of years here, I find myself paying attention to tailgate hinges all the time now 😂
And then you will need to buy Classic Tubes brake lines too! But it is money well spent IMO. I have both the fuel and brake lines in stainless from Classic Tube for about 15 years now and they still look and function like new. If you don't plan on keeping the Jeep, you can save some money with the purchase of steel lines instead of stainless.

As far as putting the tailgate hinges upside down, I think we all did that at one time or another. I even did that during mock up of the Repli-tub I have.

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I'm still going down the rabbit hole of 'one thing leads to another' repair work. Maybe a frame-off resto would have been faster :LOL:

I've got the bulk of the rot cut out of the driver side rear floor pan area and before I go installing my new patch panels, I stared down at these rusty 40 year-old fuel lines and figure this is the best opportunity I will have to replace them with the additional access I have for the time being.

It looks like I'm dealing with 3 lines for fuel and one brake line. On the fuel side I believe there is a supply line, return line, and a vapor line. I found these in stainless steel from Classic Tube, but for a pretty penny when pre-bent (Classic Tube JEF1023-SS Fuel Supply Line for 76-81 Jeep CJ-7 with 8cyl). They are all $80 which is a heck of a lot more than I wanted to spend. I can also get a bulk 20' of stainless fuel line from Jegs for $80. So my question to the group is are the pre-bent lines worth the expense? I'm set on stainless but can't find any other suppliers who offer pre-bent lines for CJ's.

TIA

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I would opt for pre-bent from Classic Tube, too. That was used on a frame off CJ7 restoration project before I took it over. It fits perfectly. And, unless you have good pipe bending and flaring tools, stainless isn't easy to work with.
 

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I do not use stainless tube, it is too hard and as I am replacing lines that are 40 to 70 years old, I know that mild steel is fine.

I do what StoneTower does, on brakes anyway, and use cupronickel and one of those great die flaring tools. Turns out perfect double flares every time.

But your question is about fuel lines so I would not worry about flares, certainly not if you are using carbs and about 7psi of pressure. The fuel hose clamps will keep it on fine.

Yes, 3/8" will work fine on all the fuel pipes, I have also used 1/4", the 3/16" is too small and you waste energy on pumping through a small pipe. The fuel lines are tucked up out of the way inside the chassis so I do not bother with encasing them in spiral gravel wrap. They are mostly simple straight runs with a few small bends at the engine bay and above the tank, none of which needs to be precise. You could form them from a roll of tube and a hacksaw.

Do not forget P clips to secure them, about $10 for a bag.

A 25 foot coil of galvanized 3/8" line should do all 3 lines, on Amazon that is $21.

I would pay more than $21 for the fuel hose, best quality as this is the stuff that goes first, 3/8" and length depends on your system, at least 10 feet maybe more.

Clamps should be the spring clip type, constant tension. They are a PITA so most use worm clamps, do not overtighten. A bag about $10

So by the time you finish I would expect you pay for all parts about $75.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the videos @StoneTower. I have created plenty of brake lines with this little baby pictured here but have since lost the inserts so it's pretty useless. I like the newer style ones like what you pictured. I do plan on changing out the brake line as well during this time.
Line Font Bicycle part Auto part Circle


Thanks to all for the feedback on the Classic Tubes product. Since I do intend to (eventually) move to FI, I think it's smart to plan for that now. I'm thinking a 3/8" supply line, a 5/16" return line, and the question then is do I stick with a 1/4" vapor line?

Since there was never a 3/8" supply line it looks like I will have to make one of those. I'm thinking:

To your point @BagusJeep, while the system is still carburated I shouldn't need anything too fancy in the way of high pressure rubber hose or flares. Great point on the worm clamps as they do tend to cut into the rubber and are easy to overtighten. I have quit using those in favor of these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0040CU0HM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1. I really like these clamps and I think they look better under the hood too!
 

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If you are looking for pre-bent Inline Tube is another choice to look at. I used their complete, steel set on my 67 C10 with great results. Just a few tweaks here and there. But, I was also going from manual, drum brakes to power disc up front. Just got replacement fronts for my CJ5 from them as well. The one to the passenger side front was replaced (poorly) by a previous owner and I don't skimp on the safety stuff. All the flex lines will get replaced as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
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