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Discussion Starter · #1,101 ·
Larry, what skillets, fryers or Dutch Ovens are you rocking ?

I really swear by the pre 1960 stuff as they were made with real quality in mind back then .

Nice old ones can easily be found at Flea markets and yard sales for dirt cheap .

Yeah they may look like rusted junk and can be bought for 5 bucks but they can easily and cheaply be restore to near new condition .

My go to pan/fryer that I use the most looked like yesterdays news when I found it and I could now sell it for some pretty good bucks .

I have a quite few old CI things and collect old ones as I find them very cool for wall hangers or just plain good cooking .

Larry, I see that you are one year younger than me so I think that you may well remember your Grands or even your Mother cooking on CI .

I can remember eating CI cooked food cooked on wood stoves by my peeps a long time ago .

I have a passed down 1926 Griswold Hearts and Star #100 pan that is worth a whole lot of money and old pans are well worth looking for .
 

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Hey every one has their own way. A lot of them differ and there are many that believe certain things that nothing will change. So if it works for you cool. Cracking the pan is a possibility and the only bad thing I heard on putting cold water into a hot pan. You basically are deglazing the pan.
Water???

Don't you mean beer, whine, etc??? :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,103 ·
Sometimes I just pour boiling water from my coffee pot into my fryer as I figure that the pores in the already hot pan are wide open and boiling water will clean it out better with them that way .

Then I dry it out with a paper towel and put it on a hot burner until I'm sure it's dry and rub some lard on it before it cools .

But most all times I just put course salt in it with some type of cooking oil and kind of scour it good using a paper towel or two .

And at other times all I need to do is just wipe it out good with a paper towel .

My most favorite CI stuff is damn old and I don't take any chances with it .
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,104 ·
Nope! I love pretty womens! You u can always teach them to cook but you damn sure won't teach an ugly womans too be purty...... Lifes too short for that sort of thinking! ;)
Light switches work wonders but you might want to leave before the Dawn's early light comes around ? :shhh:

Small bed, cold night, big woman, it doesn't get any better than that .

Just say'n
 

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I use hot water and a plastic scrubber. It has a plastic scraper on one side and bristles on the other.

Of course, my CI pans are smooth as teflon and the stuff just flakes off. And, I do not use them for any sauces that are going to burn. But, I can drop a pat of Parmesan in a hot skillet until it is a brown little wafer and they comesw right out.

I see that there are some people that wash CI with soap and detergent. I was taught otherwise by people who relied on these pans.
 

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These are not my words. they were taken from a CI site i frequent. These are the words of a guy that's been cooking/collecting CI for 65 years


Although this whole thing may only be 5 mm thick including the iron, this is how I picture a cross section of the seasoning on my well seasoned iron.



I think the pic portrays a surface that is as non-stick as possible with natural seasoning and that is built with cooking over time - from the top down. Just like the earth. The leaves on top (slippery when wet) of last years leaves which are turning to dirt. Then dirt to clay & on to stone or coal with pressure and heat.

The top layer is fragile. This can be seen when one washes an enameled skillet after use and the surface is then clean. A little dishwashing soap is normally all one needs to remove the polymerized oils and get it clean.

Now imagine how hard it will be to build seasoning if every time you use a pan that you remove that layer of polymerized oil or fat with dish washing soap or serious scrubbing even with just hot water.

In the days of cast iron stoves the skillet was not washed after every use. No wonder the seasoning built up so thick, strong and non-stick. Want to build seasoning? Use it, wipe it out and leave it on the stove. The old fashion way without silicone in your cooking spray.
 

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LP, I'm open minded. You can mess up the seasoning on your CI pans with detergent if you want to, but I'm happy to see that lovely glazed surface remaining after I wash it out with water only and wipe it dry with a nice paper towel.

This isn't my first rodeo. I've seen CI pans scrubbed with soap and water. they rust if you don't coat them. No thanks. But you just keep on keeping on. OK by me. :thumbsup:
 
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Even worse, a friend of ours (old neighbor for 14 years)
throws her CI, knives, everything in to the dishwasher.
 

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New house we bought last year came with a dishwasher.

I made the mistake of putting my kabob skewers in the
dishwasher. Had to trash them after 16 years!
 

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I recently went to the butcher and got a pound of beef fat to render down and use in place of olive oil. I haven't noticed any change in seasoning on my CI skillet but it adds a depth of flavor that you don't get from just using olive oil.

Plus, it's $1.75 a pound vs $12 for 20 oz.


Shawn
 

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Before the new house, I had a really nice dishwasher!
But she can't cook for ****! It's okay though, I'd rather
cook than do dishes!
 

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I was taught to boil water in the pan/pot. while it boils use a wood or today a silicon spatula to scrape the food bits off. Then rinse well with HOT water. Once satisfied dry it in a 500* oven then coat lightly with lard and let it bake off for an hour. This is what I do every time. For tough stuck on stuff which is rare. I use a scotch bright pad for non stick pans, it is only use for my CI and never sees soap.

Oh I brown cheese to use as potato topping. Love that I can.
 

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I treat mine similar. Only I use hot tap water to clean,
place it on the stove top on medium until dry, then
coat with Crisco when it has cooled. I place a paper
towel on top, and keep it under my 4 quart pressure
cooker.
 
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I'm tickled to death! I got my own set of cast iron for my outdoor cooking. Now I won't have to listen to the wife complaining about me dragging her good cast out to the fire. They need cleaned and seasoned but I will have them ready for the weekend! :)
 

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If that griddle is a 911 pattern #, its worth north of $150. Also what size is that skillet? #12? depending on the maker, same price

also that real small one is an ashtray. before you put food in it, you should do a lead test
 

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If that griddle is a 911 pattern #, its worth north of $150. Also what size is that skillet? #12? depending on the maker, same price

also that real small one is an ashtray. before you put food in it, you should do a lead test
The Griswold griddle is actually a 909, The rest is a set of unmarked lodge, the biggest is a 12. I gave 90 bucks for all of it. My 14 Griswold will always be my favorite pan though.
 

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