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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While this area is called BBQ & Grilling, I tend to think of this as BBQ, Grilling and Cooking .

There are times when I want to sear meat in cast iron on the stove and then put the meat on the smoker or just cook it on cast iron .

That said I have not used my 10 1/4 inch Lodge CI pan in a while and while it has no rust on the bottom of the pan there are a half a dozen small slightly rusty areas on the inside edges of the pan .

Should I just wire brush the small spots that it has with my drill bit with the brass brush and/or with some steel wool and then oil the areas and bake it in ?

I think so .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
it is very slight surface rust and I was thinking steel wool on the spots and reseasoning the whole pan then putting it in the oven for an hour or so at 350 to 450 degrees or so afterwards .

I have read that white vinegar works pretty good on the rust too .

I will try the salt and oil first so thank you very much Hash .

As I have said, I have done quite a few old cast iron pieces but never just small spots before .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Another question please if anyone knows .

What oil would be the best oil to use to season cast iron ?

I have read bacon grease, flaxseed oil, vegtable oil, canola oil, crisco, lard, peanut oil, EVOO, etc.

The best oil in my book would be the one with the highest smoking point for seasoning .

I am leaning towards bacon grease as that is what we have used down South for a very, very long time but I don't know .
 

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440 F: Peanut Oil†
: Sunflower Oil†
450 F: Corn Oil, Refined
: High-Oleic Sunflower Oil,
Refined
: Peanut Oil, Refined
(Good Eats)
: Safflower Oil, Ref.
(Good Eats)
: Sesame Oil, Semi-Refined
: Soy Oil, Refined
: Sunflower Oil, Semi-Refined
460 F: Olive Pomace Oil**
468 F: Olive Oil, Extra Light*
485 F: Grapeseed Oil**
495 F: Soy Bean Oil?
500's
510 F: Safflower Oil†
520 F: Avocado Oil, Refined
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Locutus, I spent about a hour doing the prep. this morning and went with what I had at hand grease wise .

After some research I decided to go with bacon grease and not EVOO .

I have had it in the oven at more than 350 and less than 400 the last hour or so .

I will recoat it and do it another two times before the day is over after letting it slowly cool each time .

The cooking surface looks a tad blotchy for now and I will report back later today after a few more coats and bakes .

The last time I did this pan I use 1 coat of vegtable oil and it came out like a champ .

I may go with my Pompeian Imported EVOO for the next coat or two depending on how the mood suits me .

Any thoughts on that ?

Thanks again for your imput .
 

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i use avocado oil for seasoning only. I cook in bacon grease mostly.I will use EVOO in certain situations. i save it all. if you run it thru a coffee filter a few times to get out all the debris, it won't need refrigeration

FYI when you get rust again use a brillo pad and water to remove. hand dry and put in a 500 degree oven to dry completely. the heat will open any pores in the pan. Remove and coat with oil and put it back in for an hour. after an hour shut off the oven, leaving the pan in till its cool [the oven]
 

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I have seasoned many cast iron pans over the years using various methods and it always seems to turn out about the same. But, you never really get the good shiny non stick base until you just plain use it a lot. I have my one main pan which has about 50 years of seasoning and works better than Teflon. I also have a couple others that I use on the grill, over a fire camping and generally mistreat. Those work pretty well but they get scorched once in a while so I can never get them to stay just right.
 

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First, never use olive oil. Only Crisco, peanut or lard.

I have seen Lodge pans dug up from the dirt and restored to perfect. A Lodge pan can always be restored to good working condition. And it sounds as though your pan can use a ground up restoration. Remove everything on the inside (bottom and sides) with steel wool starting with 0 and then go to 0000. Ignore the outside unless the rust bothers you, then brush it off with a stiff brush.

Wash and dry, coat the inside lightly with Crisco or Crisco oil and in the oven at 450F for a couple of hours. Remove, wash with water, dry and repeat. And, as was said above, use it for everything until it has its nice seasoned glaze back.

BTW, for scorched on meat residue, use a flat steel spatula (no abrasives or soaps) and scrape if all off until flat. Then wash with water as usual, lightly coat with oil and off you go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for your input Wilson and I will do the next two seasoning today with the bacon grease instead of he OO, because as I said, I will go with what I have got at hand .

Bacon grease is not a real stretch, as far as lard, so far as I can tell at this point ?

The main reason my frying pan has rusted may well be because I have not used it for several years .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lard
 

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Thanks for your input Wilson and I will do the next two seasoning today with the bacon grease instead of he OO, because as I said, I will go with what I have got at hand .

Bacon grease is not a real stretch, as far as lard, so far as I can tell at this point ?

The main reason my frying pan has rusted may well be because I have not used it for several years .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lard
Bacon grease is every bit the same as lard for this purpose. It has a little smokey residue which will linger for only one use, so go ahead with the bacon grease.

For light surface rust, which I have gotton on some of my cast iron pans, I wet a paper towel with Pam and rub vigorously. But, if the rust feels like sandpaper you need to cut it down with steel wool. I don't use any soap on these pans, ever, even when reconditioning them. So, for me, Brillo and SOS are out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ouch, note to myself, it is a very bad plan to try to shift the pan by the handle while curing it in the oven at 400 degrees .

My left index finger is not a very happy camper right now .

I just spanked my own a$$ again damn it .

Live and learn, sigh .
 

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If your pan is too bad you can always re-season it, I do this to any of the ones I buy used like old Griswalds or Wagners. I just get a fire nice and hot and put the pan in the coals, it burns everything off including the rust, just be careful not to get it too hot and crack it, then I clean it with warm soapy water then throw it in the oven to get it completely dry. I try to use the oil that has the highest smoke point for the seasoning.
 

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Easiest way I've found to reseason is to put them in a tote with lye and water overnight. Pretty much everything comes off and there's no danger of cracking.

Then heat to 250 for about 20 minutes to dry then cool and proceed with whatever seasoning practice you like.
 

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I just cleaned up a rusty dutch oven. I removed the rust with a mixture of 1 part molasses and 8 parts water. Let it soak about a week and that took off all of the rust. Washed it in hot soapy water and put it in the over at 300 for a few minutes to dry. Then, while still hot coated it with Crisco and back in the over at 450 for 2 hours. Did that treatment twice. Turned out great.
 
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