Jeep Enthusiast Forums banner
61 - 80 of 111 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
You can NEVER go wrong with the basics. :)
Disc brake brackets. Cool gussets. Trusses. Foot pegs. Diff covers/skids. Shock towers/tabs. Etc etc.
I have pretty much everything in in list already done that I have the axles and such to measure off of.

If you're doing much modding to your Jeep at all, I highly recommend drawing it in 3D. Not necessarily the entire Jeep (but that wouldn't be bad), but at least the front and rear end of the frame, rough in the body (doesn't necessarily need all the contours); however, it aids greatly when you're designing bumpers, rock rails, and etc. It's also handy when you want to see what the profile is going to look like with "X" amount of lift or stretch.
3d autocad sucks so bad. If I was working on solid works I would be open to something like this, but even though auto cad is a amazingly powerful piece of software, 3d design is almost completely useless with it if you consider how much time and energy it takes to learn even the most basic design skills in 3d AC.

If your looking for some real good practice definitely the chassis would be a huge help to everyone.
I've done quite a bit of design lately. I'll be cutting back as I'm back in college now. My classes from here on out are so time intensive that I doubt I'll be doing much side work. If you want to donate a chassis for the cause, I'll work on in my spare time. Unfortunately my yj frame is completely shot and the PO has already beat and cut it so many times I wouldn't begin to know where the factory frame war originally located
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
What about truss kits? Something similar to Artec, etc.. Basic piece-assembly trusses for the standard axles, with armor tie-ins maybe. Control arm mounts. Track bar mounts. Etc. etc.

And somehow I've never seen drawings for something as simple as a diff cover for D60,D44, 14b, etc.

I've just seen "I've got plans for these, but I'm keeping them because I might try to make money from them." I'm not against someone making money from their work at all. I'm just saying that if you want a idea of something to design and share, there ya go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
What about truss kits? Something similar to Artec, etc.. Basic piece-assembly trusses for the standard axles, with armor tie-ins maybe. Control arm mounts. Track bar mounts. Etc. etc.
I can post all this stuff. I don't have any trusses but I have a couple dana 44s in the garage that will be getting some soon enough. I have to cut, shorten and lengthen them before they are ready. What do you mean by "with armor tie-ins"? As in Differential cover tie-ins and pinion supports?

And somehow I've never seen drawings for something as simple as a diff cover for D60,D44, 14b, etc.
Look at page 4, I personally posted this. Maybe this "somehow" is because you haven't looked.

I've just seen "I've got plans for these, but I'm keeping them because I might try to make money from them." I'm not against someone making money from their work at all. I'm just saying that if you want a idea of something to design and share, there ya go.
I could post all 157 or so pages I have built, I would prefer to only post the ones that people actually request.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
That's cool that you can tackle things like this. I know I appreciate the shared skill/assistance. As for the missed stuff, sorry. I'll go back and read again. I follow this page, but must have missed that.

Yeah, for tie-ins, I meant places designed into the truss to locate and support pinion skids, etc., as well as a pint to tie truss into diff cover.

Thanks again for sharing. To everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
If you design anything in Autocad 2D and want a 3D version let me know. I work with solidworks and it's pretty easy to do once all the measuring is done.
I have a front and rear truss for a TJ 30/44 in solidworks will post it up tonight if I remember. They aren't perfect they need some adjustment but it's at least a start.
Don't think I've seen it here but anyone drawn a TJ transmission skid? Mines all bent up so don't particularly want to measure off that. 1998 5 speed.
Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Heres the drawings for a front truss to suit a TJ dana 30. This requires the factory upper control arm mount on the long tube side to be cut and re used. I did not weld this on myself I had someone else do it and they said the parts were close around the pumpkin but required about 10mm to be taken off the bottom. I do not have the need to make any more so will not be redoing the drawings. However if someone would like to do the measuring/test fitting I would be happy to edit my drawings.
These are originally done in solidworks and can provide the files if the forum admin allows .sldprt and .sldasm extensions or if you pm your email address.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Heres drawings for a rear TJ Dana 44 Truss. As above the drawings arent perfect. Can edit them if you provide me measuring/test fitting. Solidworks files available.

I will be doing a 44 and 60 truss to suit my CJ10 at some point in the near future as well which should suit FSJs and possibly custom applications.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
3d autocad sucks so bad. If I was working on solid works I would be open to something like this, but even though auto cad is a amazingly powerful piece of software, 3d design is almost completely useless with it if you consider how much time and energy it takes to learn even the most basic design skills in 3d AC.
If you can draw an object using a polyline, the only real additional commands that you need to know are extrude, revolve, slice, subtract, align, interfere, and union. There are a lot of handy commands that you can pick up as you go; however there isn't much you can't do with a good understanding of 2D AutoCAD and the commands listed above coupled with the ability to envision parts in three dimensions. I have a ton of engineering software at my disposal, but when I decide to rough something out, 9 times out of 10 I do it in AutoCAD.
A large part of my reasoning for this is the way you build it in the program. You build things in the program using the same processes you do in the shop with real material. It may take you a little more time (at least when you're new to it), but it's much easier to avoid designing yourself into a corner.

Disclaimer:
I've been using AutoCAD professionally for about 20 years. I'll admit that I have some bias. That being said, I've worked with SolidWorks, Pro-E, Inventor, Mudbox, Mechanical Desktop, GDS, and a whole bunch of other stuff that you've never heard of and plain old AutoCAD is still my go to software. It's a workhorse and there simply isn't anything else out there that will cover the range of work that you can do with it.

Disclaimer Part II:
My "needs" may be a bit different than yours. I don't draw parts for practice. If I'm drawing a part, I'm either trying to decide whether it's worth the effort to build, or I've decided to build it and it's too complex to build on the fly without wasting a lot of material or time. Also, in addition to using design software for the standard "cutting and welding with a little forming where absolutely required" type of fabrication work that most folks on this site do, I also use it for machining work, sheetmetal forming, and metal casting. I need a program that is fairly capable in all these areas because I often have combinations of different fabrication disciplines that come together as an assembly.

In other words, mileage will vary, but give AutoCAD another shot. You don't have to use every command in the book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I've been working on this for a while, finally cut it out the other night. Fits good on my axle.

This is an "Artec style" truss I drew to match my rear artec truss. Why not just buy it right? They don't make on for my axle and weren't interested in doing so when I asked.

This fits a wagoneer width HP D44. It may need a little tweaking here and there for your application, but it fit exactly how I wanted it to on my axle.

I can't attach the Solidworks file due to no forum support, but here's the dxf files. If you want the solidworks file PM me your email and I'll send it with the condition that if you modify it/improve it you post it here for others.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Hello all!

Excellent resource! I am a cad designer by profession, designing industrail equiptment, and design custom motorcycle parts as a side gig. Now starting to design stuff for my Jeep!

Not jeep related. But a wall hanging I did a while back.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
If you can draw an object using a polyline, the only real additional commands that you need to know are extrude, revolve, slice, subtract, align, interfere, and union. There are a lot of handy commands that you can pick up as you go; however there isn't much you can't do with a good understanding of 2D AutoCAD and the commands listed above coupled with the ability to envision parts in three dimensions. I have a ton of engineering software at my disposal, but when I decide to rough something out, 9 times out of 10 I do it in AutoCAD.
A large part of my reasoning for this is the way you build it in the program. You build things in the program using the same processes you do in the shop with real material. It may take you a little more time (at least when you're new to it), but it's much easier to avoid designing yourself into a corner.

Disclaimer:
I've been using AutoCAD professionally for about 20 years. I'll admit that I have some bias. That being said, I've worked with SolidWorks, Pro-E, Inventor, Mudbox, Mechanical Desktop, GDS, and a whole bunch of other stuff that you've never heard of and plain old AutoCAD is still my go to software. It's a workhorse and there simply isn't anything else out there that will cover the range of work that you can do with it.

Disclaimer Part II:
My "needs" may be a bit different than yours. I don't draw parts for practice. If I'm drawing a part, I'm either trying to decide whether it's worth the effort to build, or I've decided to build it and it's too complex to build on the fly without wasting a lot of material or time. Also, in addition to using design software for the standard "cutting and welding with a little forming where absolutely required" type of fabrication work that most folks on this site do, I also use it for machining work, sheetmetal forming, and metal casting. I need a program that is fairly capable in all these areas because I often have combinations of different fabrication disciplines that come together as an assembly.

In other words, mileage will vary, but give AutoCAD another shot. You don't have to use every command in the book.
I am going to agree and disagree with this...lol

AutoCAD is a power house for what it is...I used it for many years. But with 15 years of experience with Solidworks, SolidWorks is my go to whenever I am doing anything. I really only use AutoCAD these days for old stuff that I have to open.

It really is what you are comfortable and proficient with...I can do things way faster in Solidworks then I can in AutoCAD these days.

I also use it for machining work, sheetmetal forming, and metal casting. I need a program that is fairly capable in all these areas because I often have combinations of different fabrication disciplines that come together as an assembly.
I have used SolidWorks for all of these fields and it is very capable of all of these.

But to each his own...it is all a matter of each persons opinions. I am glad to see other folks on the forums share a similar background in designing there own parts and making them!!
 
61 - 80 of 111 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top