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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I am getting my ring and pinion replaced due to a gear shop incorrectly installing a gear set in my rear axle. I am also having my Detroit locker replaced with an ARB because I drive in snow occasionally and it is my daily driver and would prefer selectable. I need a compressor to run the rear locker as well as air up my 35x12.50 15s and also be capable of running a front locker eventually. Would you guys recommend spending the extra change for the twin or is the single sufficient? I also would be mounting it under the hood and run highlines with a windstar intake, so the passenger side of the engine bay has lots of room. Just looking to get feedback. Seems like everyone with big tires runs the twin and the stockish Jeeps run the single but my 35s put me right in the middle. Thanks
 

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I love my dual compressor. It has a 100% duty cycle so it fills up tires fast.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good to hear. Where did you mount it? I saw that MORE makes a bracket but its pricey and I'm not sure about the location.
 

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Good to hear. Where did you mount it? I saw that MORE makes a bracket but its pricey and I'm not sure about the location.
I mounted on the inner fender of my aftermarket fenders.

When I was looking at mounting mine a few years ago, I remember reading that some people had mounted it to the empty battery tray on the driver's side.


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There is no mention of it, but it should be explored. . .

I assume from your post you want to go tankless... is that for certain?

I will also join in on go the twin route. More is always better than less in the jeep world when it comes to functional mods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the input everyone. I was leaning the twin route to begin with and will probably go that way. As far as a tank, with how fast it runs and my limited space I feel no need. I most likely won't be running air tools any time soon, and the speed has got to be a helluva lot better than my little Tsunami compressor that I've been dragging around for years. As far as mounting I'll probably also just bolt to my aftermarket inner fenders as well.
 

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I went with the single compressor because of price, and the fact that I am only running 32's.
It mounted easily to the driver's inner fender, but with your high lines, I doubt yours will fit there. I could have also mounted it to the empty ABS tray below the brake booster (it fits nicely there), but it seemed like it would be difficult to access there.

Mine will fill a 32" from 10psi to 25psi in about a minute and 15 seconds. Just FYI.





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I used an aluminum CO2 tank for a number of years - didn't care for it. It doesn't work well if you do multi day trips where you air up for pavement and air down for dirt multiple times. I'm also not a fan of the space it occupies and find them ugly.

I went back to a compressor and am happy.

ARB. Single vs Dual?

I would say Dual every time assuming you can afford it and have the space. That said, i have a single in my F350 (due to space - i wanted it under the hood) and have been pleased with it's ability to air up the tires. Not as fast as the York in my Jeep, but it still works fine.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Consider a 10 lb. aluminum CO2 tank too, I put mine together for under $200. It's faster than even most big compressors. Mine refills all four of my 35x12.50 tires from 7-8 psi to 25 for 4=5 offroad trips.
I thought about a tank, but since I need a compressor to run the lockers I figured I may as well kill two birds with one stone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
well... i guess you got it figured out then.

Twin for the win.
Didn't meant to come across like a dick with my last comment, I suck at doing the forum on my phone and made the response quickly haha. Were you going to bring up a belt driven york style option? I've considered that but the plug and play simplicity of the arb and not having to run extra pulleys making things more complicated steered me away. Plus I found a good deal through some buddies with the twin compressor. Thanks for the feedback
 

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I thought about a tank, but since I need a compressor to run the lockers I figured I may as well kill two birds with one stone.
Personally I'd never use the same compressor for tire and locker duty. It failure, rare as it might be, would cause big problems on a wheeling trip.
 

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Personally I'd never use the same compressor for tire and locker duty. It failure, rare as it might be, would cause big problems on a wheeling trip.
My 2 cents. I feel this is ridiculously over cautious. I surmise well over 95% of ppl running air lockers use a single compressor for airing up as well as locker duty. Redundancy is nice, but to a point.

If your compressor breaks, the worst that happens to you is you are now running on open diffs - though this can be troublesome on the toughest of trails, your rig will still function and still get through a good portion of most trails.

If you are on the tough trails you likely (or at least should) have a second vehicle with you, that can hopefully assist you through the rough sections.

The other problem if your only compressor breaks is you can't air back up. Again, hardly the end of the world. You can still drive on aired down tires. And if you are with a second vehicle you can use their compressor to air up.

Also if you have 2 compressors, one for airing up and one for air lockers, and your locker compressor breaks, you would need to be prepared to plumb the air lockers into the air up compressor.... Depending on the location of each compressor, this could be a simple or difficult task and may require a good amount of hose.

Or run an OX locker actuated by air. If your air compressor breaks, you can use a special bolt to lock the locker.

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My 2 cents. I feel this is ridiculously over cautious. I surmise well over 95% of ppl running air lockers use a single compressor for airing up as well as locker duty. Redundancy is nice, but to a point.
Not in my group of wheelers that commonly does the toughest trails in SoCal including those in Johnson Valley. Lose your lockers in the more difficult canyons in JV, Devil's Canyon, or the Rocktoberfest trails in Arizona and you're more likely to break an axle shaft with inoperative lockers or not get out without a lot of winching. Being cautious just enough to insure you're not going to have serious problems on extra-tough trails is why I and the couple groups I wheel with have few problems. Compressors aren't expensive and only having one to operate both your lockers and airing back up afterward gives no margin. Start doing the toughest trails and you may start to understand my point. Not to mention in my 30+ years of wheeling SoCal I've seen too many failures caused by being underprepared on the trails that caused a lot of problems for everyone. So come on, a second compressor is not going to break you.
 

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Not in my group of wheelers that commonly does the toughest trails in SoCal including those in Johnson Valley. Lose your lockers in the more difficult canyons in JV, Devil's Canyon, or the Rocktoberfest trails in Arizona and you're more likely to break an axle shaft with inoperative lockers or not get out without a lot of winching. Being cautious just enough to insure you're not going to have serious problems on extra-tough trails is why I and the couple groups I wheel with have few problems. Compressors aren't expensive and only having one to operate both your lockers and airing back up afterward gives no margin. Start doing the toughest trails and you may start to understand my point. Not to mention in my 30+ years of wheeling SoCal I've seen too many failures caused by being underprepared on the trails that caused a lot of problems for everyone. So come on, a second compressor is not going to break you.
I've done the JV trails..... And i guess that's why I run Detroit Lockers front and rear.

Maybe I'm out of touch, but does it really happen often that a compressor fails that's controlling an air locker? I would guess the problems are usually a failure of the electrical system or the air lines. I would also guess there are many other problems that occur more often than failed air compressors.

There is no way to prepare for every possible failure, or carry every spare part, you just have to be as best prepared as possible.

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To each his own. If you're convinced you'll never experience a locker compressor failure on the trail like I have, by all means place all your eggs into one basket.
 
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