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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I’m trying to swap a 95 4.0 into my 89 yj. I took the engine and complete wiring harness including under the dash ecu power dist block everything now I’ve got most of the harness under the dash done now I’ve hit another obstacle the input shaft on my ax 15 is .586 and the 95 is .78 so my thought ok get a pilot bearing from a 4.2 put it in my 4.0… wrong the o.d. Is different as well. Anyone actually dealt with this
 

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I haven't personally, but I remember reading about people getting a special pilot bearing machined down for just that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I haven't personally, but I remember reading about people getting a special pilot bearing machined down for just that.
Ya I was thinking something like that or maybe there maybe something off the shelf for another application but I can’t find it. But custom machine parts up here would be pricey labour rates are high. I’m almost ready to sell engine and tans and go small block chev
 

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If you go on Novak's website you might be able to find one.

I went on there website and under the pilot bushing section I believe they have what you want.
 

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There are literally four different pilot bearings that could be bought CJ and YJ flywheels. Plus an XJ size.

I cannot remember the exact combos that fit what.

i believe that there is the one for a 70s 304 CJ that will work- has the fat trans center but is 0.009” too big for the crank. It has an outer sleeve. That may be the one you have.

Make sure your YJ crank doesn’t have a sleeve or busing in it. I don’t think it will.

almost ready to sell engine and trans and go small block chev
that’s an extreme and goofy solution to a simple problem:)

if the shaft center is correct yet the outer bushing (sleeve) is just a tad too big (which I’m not certain but I think will be your situation) do what I did: take the outer bushing and put it centered on a bolt and nut with two washers. Tighten. Chuck it in a drill and sand with 220 wet-or-dry wrapped on a file, checking frequently with mic or calipers. Get it so it won’t quite slip in but “sticks” upon inserting in the crank center.

If you go too tight the outer hardened sleeve will shatter or crush because it is a sintered part. Too loose is making junk parts
 
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