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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, mega question for WJ gurus. WJ and I have love-hate relationship (unlike with ZJ). Brake job on my good, low mileage WJ lead to swapping axle. :) And I guess because I'm a glutton for suffering, I ended up with another WJ... This is also 2001. it was dirt cheap, but isn't running. I mean if I connected battery, it turns over and even runs for 2 seconds. But second try is just starter turning it over. I've tried to apply gas and it ran for whole 15 seconds! and then went up in smoke. It loses oil like crazy just by sitting on even concrete floor. So I figured I'd just swap engines. This is 4.7L non HO, 2001, 545RFE Transmission, Selec-Trac transfer case. According to previous owner those were working (although trans also drips a lot of fluid, and the fluid itself is ruby red, looks and smells new, so been changed and maybe trans isn't all that well). Engine has 225k miles. Local junkyard has 1999 WJ with 4.7L non HO, but with 45RFE transmission and quadra-trac transfer case. So, the question is will the donor engine that is coupled with 4 speed trans, bolt to my 5 speed trans? are they the identical engines? or some sensors different? or mounting points?
 

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Yes, it will bolt right in.

The difference in the trans is the programming in the TCM, not in the transmission nor the torque converter.

The difference between 2wd and 4wd trans is minimal, being the pan/filter, and possibly a pairing in one of the sun gears and its needle bearing unit, which will always travel as a matched pair.

If you happen to remove the engine, then while the trans front end is exposed, it is a simple matter to correct leaking front seal or o-ring on torque converter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Awesome! thanks. this is what I needed to know. This jeep's body is in really good shape, virtually no rust, just some surface spots on the bottom, has new cv-axles, new fancy brakes (ceramic pads and fancy rotors with vent holes) came with fancy falken tires which are almost new, 3 factory rims are covered in that fancy flat black satin cover, one isn't, spare tire is meh, I'd say about 70% worn, but the rim is basically new. First I've bought it as screwing around and parts jeep, because it was super cheap (tires alone worth more, but the guy was moving and just didn't care) but the more it sits in the shop, the more I feel I don't want to trash it or junk it, so I hope I can make it run again
 

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Suggestions: Start applying PB-Blaster to the the exhaust manifold to down pipe bolts/nuts, and do this every other day for several days. When you go to remove the bolts, don't remove one, then the other, just loosen one then loosen the other, especially on the right side. If you remove the rear bolt completely, the front nut will definitely spin, and it is a booger to get any wrench or screwdriver pry onto the flats.

If you just cannot get the bolts to loosen, then heat the, carefully, red hot, and remove. Once the tab on these nuts tears off, you will have trouble removing them, as they will spin... furthermore, the bolts and nuts are becoming much more difficult to locate in any shop or depot stock.. so try to conserve what you have, by soaking with penetrating fluid, and/or heat.

To remove the bell housing/engine screws, you will do well to lower the tail of the transmission about 8", and this will give you "pretty good" line of sight, with a 24" to 36" extension to the screws, from straight behind.

And to remove the engine, remove the bumper cover/grille, then the header panel in front of radiators.

Use a leveler on the hoist to allow CG changes as the engine comes out, carefully observing the air box (intake) as it clears the firewall center. Remove the engine mounts from the frame and engine to give you a little extra clearance when removing/installing the engine. The mounts are easily installed/removed with the engine in the bay. The exhaust manifolds should come out with the engine. You may also remove the engine with the entire harness still connected, and fuel line in place, but disconnected at left/lower frame location, (just left of driver's left foot on LHD vehicle). The engine harness disconnects from the PCM at firewall connectors, and there are several ground straps you should observe for correct replacement.

If you happen to remove the transmission, then remove the transfer case, but take the trans out with the engine, all one long piece, IF you have sufficient overhead clearance for your picker rig. It will probably take about 9 feet or more of head space, if you pull the engine with trans attached.

You can remove either 2WD or 4WD engine/trans, and the 2WD setup is longer, if the 4WD transfer case is removed.

You do not need to remove the A/C condenser or compressor, just flip it over to the right side, out of the way, but the battery and battery box does need to be removed. The PDC should be removed, also. The A/C condenser will simply drop down about 6", into the slot in front of the tie rod, out of the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Omg! these are such valuable suggestions, I'm literally going to print them out! THANK YOU! They are especially useful because I've never done engine swap. My ZJs run fine (i've rebuilt whole front end suspension to remove the death wobble 6 month ago, so drives like a champ) But I've always wanted to learn and do the engine myself. All my buddies say "omg, don't do it, you just going to make yourself suffer", but since I have a jeep that's broke already, worth trying to resurrect it and learn lots of stuff along the way. I don't like all cars, I like specific ones, and XJ/ZJ/WJ/JK happen to be among those and I do want to learn how to keep them running for a long time. Cheapest way is to DIY, and this forum is really awesome place to ask. Thanks for the great tips! I haven't seen these points mentioned in bunch of engine swapping youtube videos
 
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