Jeep Enthusiast Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I did bash my transmission pan but until now there as been no ill result. I'm getting an ATF leak, reddish fluid on my Ex. Manifold causing smoke. Not the lines as I live in California and there isn't as much as a streak of corrosion. I do want to replace the Tranny pan, nope not gonna pay $300 for one that will crack and leave me stranded. The cheapp stamped version will do very nice. I know martinbuilt raves about his alloy pan on his sensational if not outragous upgrade vids on goobtube. If I'd a had an alloy pan I'd have cracked it. How likely is it this little dent is causing the ATF seep and where can I get a similar deep Tranny Pan used for under $40 along with 3 gallons of ATF4 or multipurpose Universal grade. Also do I need to install the filter(s) why?


Peace out,
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,795 Posts

·
Registered
WJ 4.7 HO my 2002
Joined
·
575 Posts
For sure, an alloy pan wouldn’t have resisted that blow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,893 Posts
I installed the Ultra-Power pan that has a drain plug on mine a few years ago. It's stout and hasn't leaked a drop. The drain makes changing filters MUCH easier. It's this one: https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=9096700&cc=1381452&pt=8546&jsn=908&jsn=908 $19.21 plus shipping.

Alloy pans look awesome, but yeah, smack one on a rock and it will bust open, rather than bending as a steel pan does.

You ABSOLUTELY need the filters. Automatics generate tiny bits of metal and friction material in normal operation. The filters make sure that all that stuff doesn't get into bushings, bearings, seals, shift solenoids and tiny valves and passages, which can seriously shorten the life of your transmission. There are a LOT of very delicate parts in an automatic transmission, and they're VERY expensive to have repaired. Dropping the pan once in a while and replacing $30 worth of filters is much easier on the bank account than dropping $2K+ on a trans rebuild.

I'm amazed that you could keep driving with that much damage to the pan. The main filter sits very close to the bottom of the pan and picks up all of the fluid that the transmission needs to operate. Please post up pics when you open that thing up! I'm interested to see what that filter looks like.

NOTE: I don't recall the exact spec, but the torque spec for the pan bolts is VERY low. If you crank on them like lug nuts you will warp the pan and cause it to leak around the edges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The recommendation is exactly what I needed to see. Thank you for a concise and altruistic message. The engines and transmissions are remarkable. This jeep has 200,000+ miles on the chassis, I do wheel her with only GY AT Trailrunners. In stock size which is about equivalent to a 30" tire. I'm prepared to drop coin on this WJ and have already replaced the engine and many of the components are original eq. Some of the original components include ALL sensors, Cam timing and Crank position sensors inc. All interior and exterior lamps are LED or HG The only item requiring concentration are the CA compliant O2 Sensors and grounding straps to keep them happy. Obviously I plan to keep this jeep. Even if I have to take a 2nd mortgage. Again thank you so, so much for the information. Your timely advice means time saved, time, indeed, is money.
I plan to put her on ramps tonight. Drill a hole in the pan at the bottom of the and let it drain for a couple days. I feel like S*** treating her like this. It makes me sad but I admit I drove from SF to Las Vegas RT used only 4 tanks of gas with the A/C set on auto and she kept me cool the entire trip through the Central Valley in 102+ temps. City mileage is 17.4 mpg which is friggin insane. Stops in the Mojave for a machine gun shoot, and a 20mm cannon. Mostly sniping at rocks from altitude. Again thank you for the recommendations which I gladly will take you up on sir.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,893 Posts
I wouldn't drill a hole in the pan unless using a stop on the drill bit to prevent it from going in too far. If you punch through and the bit goes way inside, you could damage some really expensive parts. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,676 Posts
I installed the Ultra-Power pan that has a drain plug on mine a few years ago. It's stout and hasn't leaked a drop. The drain makes changing filters MUCH easier. It's this one: https://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=9096700&cc=1381452&pt=8546&jsn=908&jsn=908 $19.21 plus shipping.

Alloy pans look awesome, but yeah, smack one on a rock and it will bust open, rather than bending as a steel pan does.

You ABSOLUTELY need the filters. Automatics generate tiny bits of metal and friction material in normal operation. The filters make sure that all that stuff doesn't get into bushings, bearings, seals, shift solenoids and tiny valves and passages, which can seriously shorten the life of your transmission. There are a LOT of very delicate parts in an automatic transmission, and they're VERY expensive to have repaired. Dropping the pan once in a while and replacing $30 worth of filters is much easier on the bank account than dropping $2K+ on a trans rebuild.

I'm amazed that you could keep driving with that much damage to the pan. The main filter sits very close to the bottom of the pan and picks up all of the fluid that the transmission needs to operate. Please post up pics when you open that thing up! I'm interested to see what that filter looks like.

NOTE: I don't recall the exact spec, but the torque spec for the pan bolts is VERY low. If you crank on them like lug nuts you will warp the pan and cause it to leak around the edges.
Thanks Harry. 35 inch lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Have you tried simply tightening the bolts that hold the pan in place yet?
Hi,

The kicker is no ATF leakage from the pan, any where see photos. I installed this pan 12 years ago using HomeDepot chalking and it's not leaked a drop. I did have a sluggy PCV valve rattle, stick, rattle, stick, rattle, stick. I shoved an inflated condom into the filler secured to 15" of GP chrome baling wire, jammed it down the throat of the oil filler mouth. used a busted .25" drill bit and 90deg angle adapter and hogged 20 years of accumulation out the PCV hole, cleaned the PCV valve with O'Reilly brake cleaner and today, no smoke. I also used a .075 bit, 6mm bit to hog the weep port on the removed filler cap face. She is running noticably cleaner. Still gonna change the pan and filter. ATF does not look burned or water sodden.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thrilled nothing was amiss. The one pan suction filter was mad ugly looking. The gasket came down in one piece. I'm over joyed there will be no scraping. I got a squirt bottle filled with a gasoline and Tri-Flo blend. I'm basically down to waiting for Fed Excuse to deliver. Hope the parts are rights. hahahahahaha
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Definitely took your advice. Used a set of Roto-Kut hole saws. No pilot hole require. Went throught the pan like a hot knife! More important the Kimbal Roto-Kut includes a over depth feature. Brilliant bit of kit. I put two holes on the 1/2 trailer hitch which is at least 3/16" of hardened steel in two minutes. The beauty of cutting into a pan full of oil?? It supplies it's own edge protection! hahahahahaha
 

Attachments

1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top