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    1. · Registered
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      Sorry, I'm really clueless about this Jeep. It's for my high school son and I know he will probably do some off roading, but it will be his daily driver, so that will be it's main use. It's a 2006 Wrangler X, 4X4 with a soft top. We don't want to add anything more than a 3 inch lift. We're definitely doing a suspension lift. He would like 33's. Would like to be no higher than $1200 to get everything we need. With that said, are certain brands of lifts better than others?
      budget boost and 33's blamo done
      http://www.roughcountry.com/jeep_tj_1.html
       
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      19 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #1 ·
      Just got my BB in the mail today, but before I start taking things apart I have a question. This is the lift I got btw: http://www.roughcountry.com/jeep_tj_1.html

      From the pics, it appears that there is only one pair of bump stop extensions, but I got this in the box:



      The instructions don't mention where to install the ones on the left, but I'm assuming they replace the factory front bump stops and the ones on the right go on the rear between the bump stop mount and the bump stop cup. Is this correct? Here are pics of the instructions:



       
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      70 Posts
      Discussion Starter · #1 ·
    1. · Registered
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      67 Posts
      Sorry for the delayed responce, Im at work (I work extended hour help desk, YAY ME!!!) and had a call come in.

      Rough Counrty 1.5 inch
      http://www.roughcountry.com/jeep_tj_1.html

      Rough Country 2.5 inch
      http://www.roughcountry.com/jeep_tj_2.html

      Zone offroad has 4 options on suspension lift for your TJ
      http://zoneoffroad.com/prod-display?ca=1&ma=6&mo=56

      Quadratec has way to many to list individually, this is for TJ's
      http://www.quadratec.com/category/Jeep+Lift+Kits/123/index.htm

      Here is the exact set up im running from fat bobs garage

      http://fatbobsgarage.com/i-6808467-jeep-tj-wrangler-rear-shock-relocation-kit.html
      http://fatbobsgarage.com/i-6765291-...okee-zj-2-poly-spacer-lift-kit-1993-2006.html

      part 1 = $17.95
      part 2 = $59.95
      total(not including shipping) =$77.90

      They also have to many options to list, but if you go there and put in your jeep info it will list what should fit.

      Hope this is a little more helpfull
       
    1. · Registered
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      this write up is great and answered a lot of my questions i was searching around for... I have a rough country 3 inch lift on my xj, and in your "step 2" you mentioned spacers to give me about 5" of lift. Are the spacers all i need, or do i need longer brake lines, sye, ect.? Its a 90' and i thought i heard somewhere that older XJ's dont really need the sye untill about 6 inches of lift. Is that true? Thanks.
      I'm going to break this out a little:

      1) Spacers to up the lift:

      What I suggest when going from 3" to 4.5 or so, which is where you need to be to run 35's with aggressive trimming, is that you leave the rear springs alone and use bolt-in shackle relocation brackets (link below). Those brackets will improve ride and flex and lift about 1.5-2" on their own, not counting shackle changes or whatever. So that + 3" lift leaves gets you to 4.5+ with some side benefits. For the front, just some simple 1.5" poly spacers will work if you're cheap, or you can buy new coils for the lift height. New coils will flex better, since you've got a longer spring to compress/extend, but that may be less important for a street rig or a mud guy than for rock crawling. You'll also need to make sure that your shocks, brake lines, track bar and sway bar links can handle this additional height. If you don't have an adjustable track bar, you'll definitely need one now. If you do, just adjust it a little longer. If you don't have extended sway bar links or relocation brackets, you'll need them. If you do have a set designed for 3", they'll survive at 4.5", you'll just need to replace them with longer when they wear out. If your shocks aren't long enough, you can add BPE's (which usually reduce required shock length by ~1", which should be enough for a 1.5-2" ish lift change) or you can buy new shocks. If your brake lines aren't long enough, you'll need to relocate he mounting point or buy longer lines. You can go nuts buying new everything, or just use some cheapo shortcuts. If you want FLEX, you have to go nuts. If you want to play in mud and drive down the street with big tires, you can go cheap.

      Shackle relocation:
      http://www.roughcountry.com/jeep-xj-shackle-relocation-kit-1117.html
      spacers:
      Coil spacers:
      http://www.roughcountry.com/coil-sp...n77tof6h-FIsoX1V0jNc_EeMDuM-BKzsCIaAueR8P8HAQ

      Those are both just examples, other manufacturers make those pieces as well, and in fact the spacers are usually more like $30 than RC's $50. it's one of few things they aren't one of the cheapest around for.

      2) Brake lines

      I'm asssuming/hoping that when you went to 3" you did one of two things:
      1) Bought longer brake lines
      2) Relocated the front brake line mounting point lower.

      You just do whichever one you didn't do originally when you go from 3" to 4.5". YJ factory front brake lines are exactly like XJ ones, except that the hardline bit sticking up from the caliper is about 3" taller. So you just bolt those up, and then follow one of many threads for relocating the brake lines to get to lines that are good for almost 6" of lift (with plenty of room at 4.5") quick and easy. For the rear line from the Body to the Axle, just use a late 90's Dakota line. Same size as the XJ soft line, but several inches longer.

      Factory XJ lines CAN survive at 3" with a rig that never gets flexed out. They will NOT survive offroad use at 3" and won't survive much of anything at 4+ so if you didn't do either of those things, do them BOTH when you go to 4.5. Or else just buy lines designed for 4+" of lift and leave the mounting point alone.

      3) SYE
      The break is somewhere around 3". A lot of the late models need an SYE at 3, many early models can get away without one. At a taller lift than that, regardless of year, you need an SYE. A hack'n'tap SYE costs about $100, and you can usually use at XJ front driveshaft for the new rear with those kits. That's something like $25 at a junkyard plus the cost of new U-joints. That's especially nifty since you can carry one spare shaft that covers both your front and rear shafts. Note that many aftermarket SYE kits (notably rough country's) are designed to fit both TJ's and XJ's. TJ's have a VERY short wheelbase and SYE kits cross-listed for them are often VERY short (like RC's) and require a longer driveshaft. I got such an SYE kit in a trade and had to use a V8 4x4 WJ front driveshaft, which is almost identical to an XJ front shaft, except that it's a couple of inches longer. Custom driveshafts can also be made. For example you can pick up a JY XJ shaft and have a shop shorten or lengthen it as needed for something in the neighborhood of $100 (plus cost of shaft to be modified and new u joints). Brand new custom driveshafts (Tom Woods for example) are more expensive, but can be very high quality pieces.

      It would help a lot, when giving advice, to know your use case. There are different priorities for a street only rig, a trailered rock crawler, a trailered mud/sand/snow buggy, jeepspeed, expedition vehicles or a weeekend warrior DD doing more than one of those. Rock crawlers need a ton of traction, armor, flex, strong axles and strong steering, but don't typically abuse their brakes as much as a highway speed vehicle. A mud/sand/snow buggy needs a bunch of traction, but doesn't really need much in the way of armor and doesn't stress its steering, axles or brakes as much as others. A lifted street rig used on the highway needs rock solid steering and brakes, but no armor, traction gadgets or outrageously strong axles. Expedition vehicles need a bit of everything with a focus on overbuilding to reduce breakages and thus stranding but have the option to dodge the hardest obstacles, while multi-use are typically balancing cost and capability but can often afford to carry more spares on the weekends and overbuild less etc...etc...etc...
       
    2. · Registered
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      179 Posts
      this write up is great and answered a lot of my questions i was searching around for... I have a rough country 3 inch lift on my xj, and in your "step 2" you mentioned spacers to give me about 5" of lift. Are the spacers all i need, or do i need longer brake lines, sye, ect.? Its a 90' and i thought i heard somewhere that older XJ's dont really need the sye untill about 6 inches of lift. Is that true? Thanks.
      I'm going to break this out a little:

      1) Spacers to up the lift:

      What I suggest when going from 3" to 4.5 or so, which is where you need to be to run 35's with aggressive trimming, is that you leave the rear springs alone and use bolt-in shackle relocation brackets (link below). Those brackets will improve ride and flex and lift about 1.5-2" on their own, not counting shackle changes or whatever. So that + 3" lift leaves gets you to 4.5+ with some side benefits. For the front, just some simple 1.5" poly spacers will work if you're cheap, or you can buy new coils for the lift height. New coils will flex better, since you've got a longer spring to compress/extend, but that may be less important for a street rig or a mud guy than for rock crawling. You'll also need to make sure that your shocks, brake lines, track bar and sway bar links can handle this additional height. If you don't have an adjustable track bar, you'll definitely need one now. If you do, just adjust it a little longer. If you don't have extended sway bar links or relocation brackets, you'll need them. If you do have a set designed for 3", they'll survive at 4.5", you'll just need to replace them with longer when they wear out. If your shocks aren't long enough, you can add BPE's (which usually reduce required shock length by ~1", which should be enough for a 1.5-2" ish lift change) or you can buy new shocks. If your brake lines aren't long enough, you'll need to relocate he mounting point or buy longer lines. You can go nuts buying new everything, or just use some cheapo shortcuts. If you want FLEX, you have to go nuts. If you want to play in mud and drive down the street with big tires, you can go cheap.

      Shackle relocation:
      http://www.roughcountry.com/jeep-xj-shackle-relocation-kit-1117.html
      spacers:
      Coil spacers:
      http://www.roughcountry.com/coil-sp...n77tof6h-FIsoX1V0jNc_EeMDuM-BKzsCIaAueR8P8HAQ

      Those are both just examples, other manufacturers make those pieces as well, and in fact the spacers are usually more like $30 than RC's $50. it's one of few things they aren't one of the cheapest around for.

      2) Brake lines

      I'm asssuming/hoping that when you went to 3" you did one of two things:
      1) Bought longer brake lines
      2) Relocated the front brake line mounting point lower.

      You just do whichever one you didn't do originally when you go from 3" to 4.5". YJ factory front brake lines are exactly like XJ ones, except that the hardline bit sticking up from the caliper is about 3" taller. So you just bolt those up, and then follow one of many threads for relocating the brake lines to get to lines that are good for almost 6" of lift (with plenty of room at 4.5") quick and easy. For the rear line from the Body to the Axle, just use a late 90's Dakota line. Same size as the XJ soft line, but several inches longer.

      Factory XJ lines CAN survive at 3" with a rig that never gets flexed out. They will NOT survive offroad use at 3" and won't survive much of anything at 4+ so if you didn't do either of those things, do them BOTH when you go to 4.5. Or else just buy lines designed for 4+" of lift and leave the mounting point alone.

      3) SYE
      The break is somewhere around 3". A lot of the late models need an SYE at 3, many early models can get away without one. At a taller lift than that, regardless of year, you need an SYE. A hack'n'tap SYE costs about $100, and you can usually use at XJ front driveshaft for the new rear with those kits. That's something like $25 at a junkyard plus the cost of new U-joints. That's especially nifty since you can carry one spare shaft that covers both your front and rear shafts. Note that many aftermarket SYE kits (notably rough country's) are designed to fit both TJ's and XJ's. TJ's have a VERY short wheelbase and SYE kits cross-listed for them are often VERY short (like RC's) and require a longer driveshaft. I got such an SYE kit in a trade and had to use a V8 4x4 WJ front driveshaft, which is almost identical to an XJ front shaft, except that it's a couple of inches longer. Custom driveshafts can also be made. For example you can pick up a JY XJ shaft and have a shop shorten or lengthen it as needed for something in the neighborhood of $100 (plus cost of shaft to be modified and new u joints). Brand new custom driveshafts (Tom Woods for example) are more expensive, but can be very high quality pieces.

      It would help a lot, when giving advice, to know your use case. There are different priorities for a street only rig, a trailered rock crawler, a trailered mud/sand/snow buggy, jeepspeed, expedition vehicles or a weeekend warrior DD doing more than one of those. Rock crawlers need a ton of traction, armor, flex, strong axles and strong steering, but don't typically abuse their brakes as much as a highway speed vehicle. A mud/sand/snow buggy needs a bunch of traction, but doesn't really need much in the way of armor and doesn't stress its steering, axles or brakes as much as others. A lifted street rig used on the highway needs rock solid steering and brakes, but no armor, traction gadgets or outrageously strong axles. Expedition vehicles need a bit of everything with a focus on overbuilding to reduce breakages and thus stranding but have the option to dodge the hardest obstacles, while multi-use are typically balancing cost and capability but can often afford to carry more spares on the weekends and overbuild less etc...etc...etc...
      I just put everything together i need; the spacers, new brake lines, new shackles, shakle relocation kit, transfer case drop kit, adjustable track bar, and drop pitman arm. All of this equaled up to about $500. Does that sound right in your opinion? I think im going with 3 inch spacers up front, the shackle relocation kit gives 1.5 inches and the shackles give 1.5-2. So at the end, i should be sitting at 6 inches of lift.
       
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