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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-03-2020 04:15 AM
keith460 In order to get at the broken piece of the bolt, the cylinder head must be removed. Are you prepared to do that? If not, take it to a competent mechanic who can.
07-02-2020 06:44 PM
c82cj
Moderate Amount of Panic

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt1981CJ7 View Post
If you guys watch the video I posted, the guy swaps out the factory plastic valve cover on a 1982 258, just like the OP has.

He clearly states there are only 2 existing holes that need to be tapped. The OP should not have to do any drilling.

All he needs is a bottom tap in the correct size. He will also have to replace the 2 studded rocker bridges with regular bridges. They should be supplied with the aluminum cover.

Matt
I was taking off my plastic valve cover and I found that one bolt was broken and I think I must have broken the other. Any idea how to fix this or am I going to have to take my Jeep to the shop in shame?
06-24-2020 01:14 PM
c82cj One more question for everyone. The guy in the video uses a Fel-Pro do I need to get that one as well or just use the cork that comes with the cover?
06-20-2020 07:31 PM
keith460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Axhammer View Post
My buddy that owns the body shop that I took my CJ-7 to, so he could put it on his frame rack to check my frame straightness, told me a little story.

Years back when the CJ-7ís were still plentiful, but old enough to start having maintenance problems, many caught fire under the hood due to the oil leaking on the exhaust manifold....

So donít drive your CJ it if the gasket is leaking bad enough that the oil runs down the side of the exhaust manifold.

Or, get a fire suppression system fitted under the hood.
06-20-2020 10:14 AM
Axhammer My buddy that owns the body shop that I took my CJ-7 to, so he could put it on his frame rack to check my frame straightness, told me a little story.

Years back when the CJ-7’s were still plentiful, but old enough to start having maintenance problems, many caught fire under the hood due to the oil leaking on the exhaust manifold. The fires burned the paint and caused enough damage to “total” the Jeep. He said he bought about 8 or nine of them over the years, with engine compartment fire damage and drove them for a while before selling them. It was an
easy fix, most the time and he said he got them for $300-$800 depending on the age and amount of damage.

So don’t drive your CJ it if the gasket is leaking bad enough that the oil runs down the side of the exhaust manifold.
06-20-2020 05:14 AM
keith460 So, up until 1982, the 258 engine already had tapped holes on the drivers side and not the passenger side? I have a spare cylinder head from a 1983 engine and the five holes on either side are not tapped. Only the front and rear 1/4-20 threads are there. AMC, in there infinite wisdom, decided to allow the plastic valve cover to leak even more during 1983 and 84 model years and as a fix, utilized the long cylinder head stud bolts on the drivers side by fitting bell shaped washers on them to hold down the cover for 1985-86. Chrysler finally saw this as a problem and made a fix with the 4.0L engine that now has 15 bolts for the valve cover.
06-19-2020 11:03 AM
Matt1981CJ7 If you guys watch the video I posted, the guy swaps out the factory plastic valve cover on a 1982 258, just like the OP has.

He clearly states there are only 2 existing holes that need to be tapped. The OP should not have to do any drilling.

All he needs is a bottom tap in the correct size. He will also have to replace the 2 studded rocker bridges with regular bridges. They should be supplied with the aluminum cover.

Matt
06-19-2020 10:27 AM
Axhammer If you want to practice tapping threads in a hole, you could always drill a hole in some scrap cast iron the same depth as the holes in your cylinder head, and then cut some threads with a tap, in the scrap piece, before cutting the threads in your cylinder head. This would give you a little experience allowing you to get a feel for how the tap cuts into the metal. Clean & lube it often with brake/carb cleaner & WD-40, it will cut cleaner threads when clean & lubed.
06-19-2020 09:24 AM
c82cj Thanks y'all! I am getting pumped up now after hearing so many say how easy this is. I am gonna probably go for it. I still welcome any advice but I will let everyone know how it goes.
06-18-2020 10:47 AM
JoonHoss Honestly, I went through the same issue on my '83; I worried and obsessed over it, and yet the actual work to prep the engine and be ready to re-install was fully complete during my 30 min lunch at work.

I had an unKnown-to-me bad t-case Mount which made getting to the back nut a bit harder, and a couple of hiccups which seemed unique to my engine, but it really, really is not that bad at all. The flat bottom tapping was the easiest part of it all.

You got this!

Hoss
06-18-2020 10:07 AM
ccoyle71 Not hard at all - one of the easiest upgrades I've done. You'll say the same thing after doing it yourself. The youtube video Matt posted is the one I watched beforehand, and it was straightforward after watching that. Mine is an 86, and only required 2 holes tapped if i recall......Good luck!
06-17-2020 06:03 PM
c82cj Thanks for the help everyone. I am going to look more into it before trying. I think I can but if I mess up with will be very costly. Unfortunately I just moved to Austin from Dallas and my mechanically inclined friends are up there. Any other tips or pictures of what holes on the '82 need to be tapped would be greatly appreciated.
06-16-2020 09:49 PM
Renegade82 I *think* your right. It's been 30+ years since I changed my 82 but I believe it's only the 2 on the intake side that need tapped. The 3 on the pass side were already using bolts. The drivers/intake side used fat washer nuts to clamp down on the rim.
06-16-2020 02:22 PM
Matt1981CJ7 I *think* the '82 head only requires tapping 2 existing holes.

OP, don't you have any mechanically inclined friends? If so, you could have the valve cover swapped out before you finished your first beer.

No time like the present to learn something new.

Matt
06-16-2020 11:18 AM
c82cj
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschool74cj5 View Post
hello
i can tell you a trick i use alot for tapping a hole straight. when free handing the tapping you have the possibility of tapping at a angle. what i have is some small block that have a tapped hole in them . then what i do is screw the tap into the small block. then i set the block down over the hole i need to be tapped. with it sitting on the material that needs to be tapped i start to tap the new hole. the tapped small block guides the tap square into the hole being tapped.

the thing about tapping a shallow hole be gentle when tapping you dont want to break a tap. reverse alot and when you feel it stop dont try to get any deeper.

oldschool
Is there a place to buy the small block for a guide? I am definitely going aluminum it just depends of if I install it or take it somewhere to be installed.

Thanks everyone for the help and support. I am trying to become a little more hands on with my CJ but absolutely still a novice with repairs
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