JeepForum.com - Reply to Topic
Thread: GrandWillys Project Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the JeepForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid e-mail address for yourself.



Email Address:
OR

Log-in










  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-03-2019 03:04 AM
Wrangler266 Wow man! You can be proud of your skills.
Thxs for the tip on the separation clip.

Keep up the good stuff.
Math
12-01-2019 02:05 AM
Gojeep More boring but necessary work going on.


Doing some more plumbing. These are the 3/8" steel OEM transmission lines. I'm just showing one of the techniques for straightening bends I use. Just clamped between some aluminium angle.


I just push a little bit at a time, then move the line in as far as it will go into the jaws each time. The squared part of the line before the bend is where the factory separation clip goes.


This is what happens if you push to far between reclamping, You get secondary bends happening causing a dog leg.


Once the bend is reduced to about 15-20*, I bend it straight in the middle of the jaws. Rotate and re clamp until it is straight all around.


Not show class, but more than good enough for what I am building. The bend was halfway between the squared part and the top bend.


The top bend was facing the wrong way. I could straighten it and then bend it the other way.


But when it has a long section before the next bend, I just twist it instead.


I now have the fuel lines run all the way as well as the transmission lines and the complete rear brake system. Still have all this to go though!


Thought I would share these hoses. They call them S hoses and are made especially for custom/universal applications.


They come in a variety of diameters and the FO on the end of the part number means these are for Fuel and Oil. They have cheaper water/vacuum versions, but you should never use them for fuel and oil!


I bought the 19mm-3/4" version to replace the power steering pump return line. You can see how much lower I have mounted the radiator than it was in the donor. It is closer as well.


I cut one of the bends off and fitted it. I was lucky with the donor top radiator hose as that just fitted right back on again. The bottom hose I had to shorten from both ends losing one of the flared end sections. I soaked the hose in boiling water to soften it and then quickly pushed it over a steel pipe slightly larger than the radiator outlet to expand it back up again. Then let cool.


Some of the more complex pipes that I was re-routing was this A/C line. I found it easier to make a template from wire first to see if I could use any of the factory bends in the new location rather than straightening it all out and starting again


This is the photo I took of the donor before pulling it apart so I knew where everything went! Even though I am making it look OEM, I try to neaten it a bit where I can.


This was I ended up with while also leaving as much room as possible for other things like the airbox and radiator overflow that was mounted on this side.


For working on the brake lines I used these tools. Rarely the centre two though as they both mar the plastic coating of the OEM lines.


I like these 3/16" line straighteners that I got from Eastwoods. I did however have to modify them so that the leading curve was at both ends rather than just one.


Just place the bend in the middle of the jaws and squeeze them hard. So long as the bend is less than 90*, they will work. Just stretch out those bends a bit first by hand that aren't.


That is the result of the bend gone between the remaining ones. I got a bit more improvement than this, if when squeezing hard, I hit the centre over the jaws with a nylon mallet while it was supported over some timber.


Lines that were shortened were re-flared with the Eastwoods tool. I was a brake mechanic many years ago and this is better than what we had back then.


A nice little trick I first saw 20 odd years ago, to separate ignition wires originally, was to use zip ties as a separation clip. First loosely loop over the two lines, then use a second zip tie around that tie between the two lines as a spacer.


Tighten the spacer zip tie fully before then tighten any remaining slack out of the other tie that is inside of it. One ready made line spacer. The line bends over the booster BTW were made with the first tool shown and the right bends were factory.


I have not done badly on using the OEM lines considering that I have 8.5" longer wheelbase than the donor Grand Cherokee and 7" of that is the front axle further forward of the firewall. Only the shortest line from the ABS pump to the nearest front wheel will have to be replaced if I want to keep the stock routing of going via the firewall first.
11-17-2019 01:55 PM
ZEN357 Really excited to see the end of this!
11-16-2019 07:11 PM
jlcoble Awesome progress Can't wait to see what you do on the bed
11-16-2019 05:05 PM
Gojeep
Quote:
Originally Posted by NashvilleTJ View Post
We are always impressed by your fab skills, Marcus, but, ahh, you installed the steering wheel on the wrong side.

[emoji846]

Fab question for you: What do you use to grind down your welds like you did here? When I try to do this, especially on thicker material, I usually use a flap wheel on the grinder, but I wind up taking too much off and leaving an indent which always shows up after paint.
I always grind down to a razor blade thickness so as not to touch the parent metal each side with a hard grinding disc. Only then do a swap to a flap disc to make level followed by a strip disc to smooth the area. Flap discs flex too much and will take off the parent metal as well if done from the start.
11-16-2019 09:18 AM
NashvilleTJ We are always impressed by your fab skills, Marcus, but, ahh, you installed the steering wheel on the wrong side.

[emoji846]

Fab question for you: What do you use to grind down your welds like you did here? When I try to do this, especially on thicker material, I usually use a flap wheel on the grinder, but I wind up taking too much off and leaving an indent which always shows up after paint.
11-16-2019 05:45 AM
Gojeep
To finish off the steering shaft I needed the column in place. Think this is the first time it has been fitted! To bolt it in I needed to refit the donor dash support frame which meant the A/C had to go in first and the brake pedal box to save pulling things to fit them later on.


Fitted the booster for the first time too and all just bolted in perfectly. The column is not only tilt but reach adjustable, I had to take both that into account before fitting the bearing support. The steering shaft actually pivots slightly through it when you adjust for tilt. I just made a simple bracket off the frame for a stronger support and to make it easier to remove the guard when necessary.


Back to the grille again. I have the turn signals chosen so had to fill in the stock holes as the new ones are a flush mount.


The filler piece I just made round and used some copper under the slots to fill them in.


Just used the mig this time as just do what my mood dictates sometimes.


Notice how much the metal rose due to the weld shrinkage. Like making a pleat or dart in material. I like to grind the bulk of the proud weld off top and bottom first before doing any hammering on it. Less material to move and the slower heat and cooling of the grinding help anneal or soften the metal a bit. Far from a full annealing process, but it can't hurt either. I dont have the weld cracking on me either during planishing.


Just by hitting hammer on dolly in the HAZ, heat affected zone, it is already almost perfectly flat.


Only now do I take the weld down to perfectly flat, because if you do that before hammering, you end up with a circle of thinner metal. Final planishing was done with a flipper and dolly.


I had spotted these turn signals on a great looking Willys Panel Delivery of Sam Hacker. He was kind enough not only tell me where he got them, but to then buy and send them to me as well.


They are a quality item with chrome plated cast steel ring and not just cheap plastic. They have 17 LED's and the circuit board is epoxy coated to keep it waterproof. Made by United Pacific to fit 39 Chevy Sedans. https://truck.uapac.com/product/cont?pid=11383


At just over 75mm-3" in overall diameter, they are between the early and later stock ones in size.


I like how they mimic the headlight bezels for shape too.


I am thinking of getting another set for the rear in both amber and red.
11-10-2019 05:19 PM
Gojeep
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoonHoss View Post
Does that go the same for aftermarket shafts? Are you allowed to cut stock one, and use aftermarket shafts and couplers?

Hoss
We can assemble a steering shaft like Double D shafts that are cut to length and the uni slipped over the ends and pined. Just not allowed to weld them without the extra expense of the x-ray and separate engineer certification. This shaft will still be inspected by the certifying engineer, but will just be part of the whole vehicle inspection required before registration can be issued.

Engineers will often only approve shafts and unis from known and previously tested companies like Flaming River and Borgeson as well. I was going to go that way and the end of the column shaft was a standard 3/4" DD shaft, the the rack end was a rarer 17mm DD and couldn't get one of those that went to a 3/4" or 1" DD shaft. Only splined ends.
11-10-2019 10:02 AM
JoonHoss Does that go the same for aftermarket shafts? Are you allowed to cut stock one, and use aftermarket shafts and couplers?

Hoss
11-10-2019 09:27 AM
NashvilleTJ Nice work on the steering solution, Marcus. Innovative approach on merging the two shafts. Interesting info on the certification requirements when modifying a steering shaft in Australia. Iíve hacked into mine more times than I care to remember, including welding on a couple of occasions. Iíll have to keep that in mind if I relocate down under.

As always, really enjoying the build.
11-10-2019 03:25 AM
Gojeep
Time to sort out the handbrake. I had drilled out all the spot welds from where the cables came into the cab under the donor's back seat. The threaded boss was where the fuel tank strap bolted in which you can see in the background on a separate bracket now as the fuel tank is only supported by the chassis and not the body.


Mounting the handbrake was easy as just bolted straight back where it was inside on the donor floor pan.


I ran the cable through the rear wall after fitting a grommet. It was easy to know where to mount the plate as it had to go directly over the existing fuel tank strap mount. The bolt even threaded into the original boss as well. Cables just hooked up as before and didn't even have to adjust the handbrake!


I also changed the resonator slip over couplings to V-band ones. I tig welded them on the inside only.


I did this to make it easier to drop the resonators out when changing the battery from below.


Working on connecting the steering shaft to the rack. As I moved the axle forward 175mm, (7"), I need a longer shaft. The hypotenuse length would have changed by 160mm, (5.25"), so that is how much longer the shaft needs to be.


The top shaft is what comes through the firewall and is collapsible by shearing a nylon pin in the event of an accident. The bottom connects to that to go to the rack and has a sliding section to take up any normal flex.


In Australia we are not allowed the cut and weld steering shafts without the added expense of the weld being x-rayed and certified by an engineer. So I went to the wrecking yard to pick up another Jeep shaft from a KJ Cherokee of the same year hoping I could use parts from that. It is the shorter, lower one of the two.


I figured that I could flip the Cherokee one and use the upper section for a new lower one as it was longer than the Grand Cherokee lower one. Was about 50mm, (2"), longer than I needed but have a plan for that.


I drilled out the nylon pin from the upper section, on the right, and pulled apart the sliding section to use the rubber boot from the lower part. What I am doing is turning the upper section into a sliding section and the extra length I don't need simply rides up further inside.


Now, to join my new piece to the Grand Cherokee upper, I had to remove the uni which is staked into place. I thought it would just push past the stakes but it popped the top of the uni cap right off instead! Fortunately this was not the uni I was going to use as I was just trialing my procedure


So I drilled the stakes being careful not to drill into the caps or take too much from the shaft ears.


The last little bit after this I used a small cold chisel to chip away the remainder. You only need to do one side.


Soaked some WD40 on the caps and picked a socket just smaller than the cap for the staked side and another just bigger to press the other side into.


Carefully pressed the uni cross across as far as it will go to the other side. Tapped the ears to help it move any time the pressure increased. Then removed the cap so I could remove the uni itself.


Once out the reverse was done to install the other shaft to it just like changing a driveshaft uni. I restaked it by squaring off a nail punch and then hitting it in different spots than before. I supported the opposite side cap to make sure it didn't try to punch out the other side.


So the old KJ Cherokee upper is the new sliding lower of the WH Grand Cherokee. It was well greased with marine grease and then the boot was fitted to keep out water. It slides as freely at the original lower section without any sidewards play


Slipped on the bearing support in the same place as when on the donor. Will mount it off the inner guard once I make them.


There is plenty of clearance with a minimum of 40mm, (1.5"), all round.


The running angles are actually less than stock as the shaft is now longer than before.
11-07-2019 04:28 PM
Gojeep Glad it was helpful to you Jim.

On the colours, a couple of months ago there was a change of heart and have looking at going similar to a Willys color of the time called Smoked Ruby. Might end up with a Jeep color like Red Velvet or Red Rock Crystal, whichever is closer, with Black Diamond Crystal Fenders that the donor had.

I ran a 2" all steel cowl hood on my XJ for decades and looked at marine stainless vents before that.

My cowl hood.
http://gojeep.willyshotrod.com/HowtoBonnet.htm

Some information I gathered on vents and placement.
http://gojeep.willyshotrod.com/HowtoBonnetVents.htm
11-06-2019 10:55 AM
JimsWillysWagon
One Piece Window Installation

Marcus,

You are indeed a wizard and I appreciate you sharing your approach to the one piece window install. I had come up with the same idea you used for the front channel, that is using the rear channels from my donor doors to become the front channel. I plan to use somewhere around a half inch aluminum standoff on the front ones. I really like the jig you made up to put the radius in the door felt so you have a smooth transition. I am using refurbished pushbutton releases (with billet aluminum buttons), the factory door latches, and refurbished outside door handles just to keep it simple. Another question I have, the replacement kit from Kaiser Willys has a anti rattle/wiper for the inside of the door about 3/8" by 1/16" steel covered by rubber. There is no way I can see to be able to mount it. The outer felt is simple because it has the little snap clips to insert into the door.

In addition I will be using the CJ/Wrangler webstrap/doorstop with the little attached wiring harness to power the window lifts. By moving the mirrors to then cowl, I eliminated having to run power through the door. I will be using the console mounted factory switch to control the mirrors.

I will be putting a 34" x 54" fabric sunroof in my rig and am working on a support system to eliminate the possibility of the roof 'oil-canning'

I appreciate your sharing your solutions and expertise and look forward to the final product!

Are you still planning using GM Verdoro Green as your primary exterior paint? In 1968 I had a Javelin which was Matador Red with black vinyl roof, I really considered repainting my Javelin with that color but never did.

My exterior color, at this time, is PPG Vibrance Wineberry over charcoal. The hood is scheduled to get a 2.5" high cowl air induction hood along with stainless steel marine vents 2.5" x 18" along the lower edge of the rear of the hood to exhaust hot air.

Again, you are setting the mark for Willys Pickups!

Jim Thompson, Boerne, TX
11-05-2019 04:10 PM
Gojeep
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimsWillysWagon View Post
Marcus, Tremendous build! I am building a 1955 wagon using AMC 360 from Grand Cherokee, Dana 44's from 1970s Cherokee, T 15 and Dana 20 from J10 pick-up. I assume from your build blog that you will be installing one piece door windows. I would find it very helpful if you would share your installation methods as this is my plan also. I will be using external power mirrors from a JK but will relocate them to the cowl region using the relocation kit from the Jeep parts catalog. I spent over three hours going through your blogs and I am amazed at the details you are accomplishing! Hope to hear from you soon.

Jim Thompson
There are a few Willys truck here built the same way as yours. Should be a nice old school build.
I cover the one piece windows already in this write up. See here. https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f22/...1/index17.html

Cheers Marcus
11-04-2019 09:58 PM
JimsWillysWagon Marcus, Tremendous build! I am building a 1955 wagon using AMC 360 from Grand Cherokee, Dana 44's from 1970s Cherokee, T 15 and Dana 20 from J10 pick-up. I assume from your build blog that you will be installing one piece door windows. I would find it very helpful if you would share your installation methods as this is my plan also. I will be using external power mirrors from a JK but will relocate them to the cowl region using the relocation kit from the Jeep parts catalog. I spent over three hours going through your blogs and I am amazed at the details you are accomplishing! Hope to hear from you soon.

Jim Thompson
This thread has more than 15 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome