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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-04-2019 02:26 AM
KUJeeper82 Figured I'd post in this thread. Will update my build thread when appropriate too.

I recently bought a refurbished Yeti 400 portable power system for $300 off Ebay from the manufacturer. I believe this approach makes alot more sense than going dual battery on the WK due to challenges with the PCM/Alternator charge system etc, as outlined earlier in this thread.

The Yeti 400 has an integral 33 AH deep cycle battery and two Anderson inputs to daisy chain additional batteries (they can be larger than 33 AH too).

My plan is to place two deep cycle AGM batteries in the quarter panel of my WAM bumper and snake the charge cables into the cab where my yeti 400 will be mounted next to my ARB 50 qt fridge. I will also add at least 100w of solar to the roof to charge these batteries thru the yeti input port when the system is connected. Perhaps add a secondary charge controller for the deep cycles on a secondary circuit as well.

Taking this approach I'll keep the vehicle 12V system isolated from my accessory system to avoid conflicts and everything will be off the shelf components tested and proven by countless others running similar setups in 4runners/etc.

Another advantage is the yeti can be removed from the vehicle to your tent for portable power while at camp. With a separate charge circuit it is possible I can run an umbilical from my vehicle to the yeti to keep it charging too.

Solar Options:
The Goal Zero panels are cost prohibitive so I'm planning to use a Renogy flexible 100w panel glued to the WK roof. I may add spacers to allow some airflow, but i have space for 1, perhaps two panels.
11-09-2018 03:58 PM
SteveROntario I finally took a picture of the batteries in my van. A person could cut a hole in their Jeep's floor to hang batteries where the spare tire normally rests if they needed this much capacity.
I've also added a couple more videos on YouTube.
10-22-2018 03:11 PM
SteveROntario
Quote:
Originally Posted by azzkicker View Post
That's a great update, and I appreciate you sharing that you no longer recommend something (not everybody does that). I looked up the CB181F and it looks good as well as affordable. I'm not familiar with this type of auto resetting (looks electronic as opposed to the bi-metallic strip style). I recently looked up the bi-metallic type and saw them ranging from 10 amps to 50 amps, and of course you can put them in parallel and add the amps up if 50 amps isn't enough. your 80 amp looks like a great option, too.

Can I ask, why are you ordering 2? Redundancy, or are you going to wire them in parallel to get 160 amps?

Just a comment: if you spray battery protector on connections like the ones in your photo, they don't seem to corrode for years and it's very quick to do. Spraying after cleaning is best, but I've used it as a lazy stopgap before, and seemed to buy me a lot of time to really clean it up.
I think I'm on my second $3 can of spray in more than a decade, so it's practically free.

I am ordering 2 because I have one breaker at each battery (end). The cable between the battery and the breaker on each end also needs good routing or physical protection to ensure it cannot get damaged.


Having a reliable battery inverter system is really nice. I went with Samlex because they make quality stuff while some of the other "name" brands available seemed pretty flaky. We only go to camp grounds or hotels when we need a shower or have to dump the tanks. The van also acts as an emergency power supply for the furnace in the house. Trying to get all of this into a WK could be problematic. The weight is significant, it takes up space, and the batteries need venting. I found that most 12 Volt deep cycle batteries are fake too, it was better to get two 6 Volt Trojan deep cycle batteries.



I do need to look in to that spray. The positive battery terminal on the starting battery is always a problem as the hood leaks on to it. I dabbled in dielectric grease and decided it is not for me. Too slippery...makes things worse usually.
10-22-2018 02:23 PM
underscore Have two in parallel sounds like a good idea, you could have only one connected for normal use but if the battery is really low connect the second one for twice the current only when you know you need it, then you avoid any risk from having a high-current breaker all the time.
10-22-2018 01:06 PM
azzkicker
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveROntario View Post
I think it was #4 that I used. You could easily use a smaller system if you have a reasonably sized loads...I went 80 Amps because I need to put the power that I'm drawing back in within a reasonable amount of time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4stItwNaknw
I may re-shoot this video with a 1080P camera now that the batteries are 3 years old but the RC-200 display died on me.
Neat video, and nicely done. I won't ask why, because I do run a Keurig on my inverter all the time. It's very convenient and very good. The harder thing to run is the microwave or the wife's hair dryer (powering a hair drying is a low price to pay for the happy companion). I haven't tried to meter out what's happening, and it occurred to me while watching yours, that I'd like to see what the 110 side is reading.

I noticed on mine that even though the numbers pencil out with plenty of margin, my inverter will alarm and shut off if the battery drops as much as yours is. I've found it's a simple matter to run the engine if the inverter alarms, then it never trips again. I'm suspicious that it is doing whatever it takes to step up to 110, and doing so from 11V is much harder than doing so from 13 or 14 volts. I've never alarmed with the Keurig, just the bigger stuff.

I have 3 large 12V batteries for my coach power, so I can be pretty frivolous for a night or two, or miserly for a week. I also have a generator that I don't like to run if we're somewhere quiet. The engine is the much quieter way to make 110V.

BTW, I mounted a $15 Craftsman meter on Velcro on the wall and permanently wired in a set of probes to my 12V system, so I can walk up to the wall anytime and switch it to read the voltage. If I need to use it elsewhere, I have a spare set of probes that I keep in my tool bag and I just pull the Velcro off the wall and read whatever I want. It's not Velcro, it's some kind of super strong plastic version of Velcro (I think 3M makes this stuff) which is very grippy. Velcro would probably hold up too.
10-22-2018 12:43 PM
azzkicker
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveROntario View Post
I have an update on the 80 amp breakers I recommended (do not get the ones in the photo, not recommended). It turns out that when the coach batteries get low the current will exceed 80 amps during charging using the alternator so it becomes impossible to charge as the breaker trips. The temporary solution is to use a battery charger to bring up the coach battery voltage. The permanent solution is to install an automatic resetting breaker but this takes away the disconnecting feature of the manual reset breakers.



I am going to order a pair of CB181F style breakers @ 80 amps each. You can use smaller ones, my van had a 30 amp auto-reset breaker when I bought it but I upgraded the batteries and wiring. The 30 amp breaker would click away like Morse code when the battery was low.



http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...mp_Marine.html

That's a great update, and I appreciate you sharing that you no longer recommend something (not everybody does that). I looked up the CB181F and it looks good as well as affordable. I'm not familiar with this type of auto resetting (looks electronic as opposed to the bi-metallic strip style). I recently looked up the bi-metallic type and saw them ranging from 10 amps to 50 amps, and of course you can put them in parallel and add the amps up if 50 amps isn't enough. your 80 amp looks like a great option, too.

Can I ask, why are you ordering 2? Redundancy, or are you going to wire them in parallel to get 160 amps?

Just a comment: if you spray battery protector on connections like the ones in your photo, they don't seem to corrode for years and it's very quick to do. Spraying after cleaning is best, but I've used it as a lazy stopgap before, and seemed to buy me a lot of time to really clean it up.
I think I'm on my second $3 can of spray in more than a decade, so it's practically free.
10-21-2018 06:37 PM
SteveROntario I think it was #4 that I used. You could easily use a smaller system if you have a reasonably sized loads...I went 80 Amps because I need to put the power that I'm drawing back in within a reasonable amount of time.

I may re-shoot this video with a 1080P camera now that the batteries are 3 years old but the RC-200 display died on me.
10-21-2018 05:54 PM
ravenworks What size wire do you plan on using for your 80amp breaker?
10-21-2018 04:24 PM
SteveROntario I have an update on the 80 amp breakers I recommended (do not get the ones in the photo, not recommended). It turns out that when the coach batteries get low the current will exceed 80 amps during charging using the alternator so it becomes impossible to charge as the breaker trips. The temporary solution is to use a battery charger to bring up the coach battery voltage. The permanent solution is to install an automatic resetting breaker but this takes away the disconnecting feature of the manual reset breakers.



I am going to order a pair of CB181F style breakers @ 80 amps each. You can use smaller ones, my van had a 30 amp auto-reset breaker when I bought it but I upgraded the batteries and wiring. The 30 amp breaker would click away like Morse code when the battery was low.



http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...mp_Marine.html
07-12-2018 08:49 PM
omsok Charcoal canister? Mine is a CRD. I put battery in the rear right hand side fender well. http://www.engineeredobsolescence.co...battery-setup/
06-20-2018 02:31 PM
Tango. The dometic is a very good make. I have an ARB and it uses a little less amps that the dometic and it will keep cold a good 3 days on the aux battery, if you are not opening and closing it much. The dometic is build tougher than the ARB and cools faster, but uses slightly more amps. When the fridge/freezer is on the aux battery you can set the fridge to drain more of the battery. I do not have solar yet, but have been looking at the 100 watt fold up panel.

I also added 2 LED volt meters so I could see the battery levels.
06-20-2018 02:02 PM
jimbono Awesome, thanks so much! I just bought a dometic 12 volt fridge and will probably need to add another battery. I might do a solar set up isolated from the main system or just do a dual battery system that charges from the alternator(or connect solar as well). Iíll make sure to post what I end up doing. I may not end up needing the additional power but it would be a lot of peace of mind.

Thanks for replying!
06-19-2018 07:27 PM
Tango. I have the diesel and it doesn't have that canister. You can put the battery in either quarter panel. I hung it to the frame with the optima mount available from jegs or one of those speed shops catalog places.
Make sure you get a deep cell and not the starting battery. The isolator is mounted up front by the main battery, it turns on after detecting your engine is running. then I have two 150amp breakers, one up front and in the other rear by the battery. Then I ran a heavy line from the rear battery to under the rear seat to a power distribution box on the passenger side so you can get to it.

It has been working great for years now. It also works fine when submerged. (tested this).

I ran a heavy line (marine battery cable) front to rear. This is was done for winching. 99% of the time it running aux lights, and fridge/freezer. If I'm at camp I can turn on the LED's without the engine running.
06-18-2018 10:20 PM
azzkicker
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimbono View Post
I saw your other photo of the battery behind the quarter panel. What did you do with the charcoal canister (I think thatís what the big box is) that was in the same location?
I'll try to answer, in case he isn't looking. If I recall from reading his write-up, he put it in the fender that didn't have the charcoal canister.
06-18-2018 12:41 PM
jimbono I saw your other photo of the battery behind the quarter panel. What did you do with the charcoal canister (I think thatís what the big box is) that was in the same location?

Quote:
Originally Posted by omsok View Post
Thanks. How did you wire up your isolator? I confirmed today with a Chrysler CRD mechanic that these vehicles use voltage regulator controlled through the ECU. Looking at the wiring today I see the positive splits to one of the electrical boxes next to the battery, and to the batter itself. Wondering where you wired in your isolator. Any photo appreciated.

I like the battery tray placement there. Will have to look into that. Any problem with voltage drop from the isolator? Are you using an AGM DC to DC charger?

Thanks again, great help.



I put a Blue optima in the 1/4 panel. The isolator in the front has a delay so when the jeep starts it starts on the main battery only.

All the auxiliary stuff is wired to the auxiliary battery.

It's behind this 1/4 panel.



Jegs sells some optima battery mounts for race cars, and I used one of those to mount it to the frame rail.
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