8.8 Ford Explorer Rear End - Page 2 - JeepForum.com
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post #16 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 05:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
I'm no fan of the 8.8 either but it is indeed slightly stronger than the TJ's Dana 44. That it has a c-clip design does not weaken/reduce its strength by any measurement. Regardless I wouldn't run one if someone installed it for free.

I'll take your word for it, but is there a set of strength numbers for axles out there somewhere? The actual strength percent increase would factor into my cost/benefit analysis if I was in the market for different axles.


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Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
While that is true for installing an 8.8 in a leaf spring Jeep like a YJ or CJ, that's definitely not (!) true for the TJ with its coil spring suspension. The 8.8 has to be stripped of its leaf spring mounts and then you have the big task of properly locating and welding into place new coil spring mounts, the track bar mount, and four control arm mounts. If you're not an experienced welder/fabricator that's anything but an easy or quick job.

Would it be easier to convert the TJ rear to leaf spring?

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post #17 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 05:39 PM
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Would it be easier to convert the TJ rear to leaf spring?
Been done. Downgrade.
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post #18 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 05:41 PM
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If you have a buddy that welds propane tanks for a living, or a friend whoís a trigger man at a local factory, or maybe even that one uncle whoís a union pipe fitter, itís going to require him a tape measure and a couple beads and your brackets are set.


But find a buddy who has the knowledge, experience, and confidence to narrow your Dana 60 or 14bolt in addition to welding on your necessary brackets. Hopefully he can shorten and re spline your shafts too or you order a custom set.

I donít know about you but I bet average joe could get buddy number 1 to show up with a few kind words and a six pack. Buddy number 2 is in for some serious time and work

You donít have to be a professional fabricator to take some accurate measurements, and lay some quality beads. If you canít run a tape measure properly you shouldnít be worried about a new axle anyways.

The 8.8 is a great axle but by all means there are better options. The 8.8 isnít the be all end all. The smarter approach is to build what you can get. If locally d60s are free go that route. If you know a guy with 10 14bolts for 50$ each go that route. If you find a fully built rear with locker, shafts etc. for reasonable price go with it.
While there are people who live in the world you posit, they are in the minority on JF.
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post #19 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 05:45 PM
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Real world numbers are all over.

But think about it in simple terms.

Explorers usually weighed more than tjs,yjs,xjs.
(3500-4200lbs)
Most were backed by a 4.6 v8
Upto 220hp stock.

Does it sound like that vehicle had a better rear axle than a d35?
I don’t know about you but I don’t find many explorers, mustangs, town cars etc with total catastrophic blown rear ends in the junkyards or in the classifieds.

And Throwing leafs on the rear of a tj would be two steps backwards in about everyone’s opinion.

And I guess so. I joined this forum because I thought it was a lot more down to earth than the others. There is middle ground between a stock d35 and a rockjock60.
And for some an 8.8 is that upgrade.

Also a big part of the swap is getting disc brake rears and I feel like some people overlook the benefits of that by itself.
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post #20 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 06:59 PM
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Originally Posted by StrippedTorx View Post
Real world numbers are all over.

But think about it in simple terms.

Explorers usually weighed more than tjs,yjs,xjs.
(3500-4200lbs)
Most were backed by a 4.6 v8
Upto 220hp stock.

Does it sound like that vehicle had a better rear axle than a d35?
I donít know about you but I donít find many explorers, mustangs, town cars etc with total catastrophic blown rear ends in the junkyards or in the classifieds.

And Throwing leafs on the rear of a tj would be two steps backwards in about everyoneís opinion.

And I guess so. I joined this forum because I thought it was a lot more down to earth than the others. There is middle ground between a stock d35 and a rockjock60.
And for some an 8.8 is that upgrade.

Also a big part of the swap is getting disc brake rears and I feel like some people overlook the benefits of that by itself.
There is a middle ground. IMO it is not the 8.8.
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post #21 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 07:11 PM
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the 8.8 is a great choice depending on your build. If you want to run reasonable size tires and not deal with a bolt pattern switch. If you want to run 42s then go 14bolt/dana 60. there is some build cost but its quite reasonable when compared to 1 tons and from a strength stand point its quite formidable.



Axle shaft Strength and output torque rating by Warn and 4 Wheeler

The axle shaft strength tested by Warn Ind:
F8.8= 6,500 (lb. ft.)
D44= 4,600-5,000 (lb. ft.)
D35C= 4,000-4,300 (lb. ft.)


COT: Continuous output torque rating
MOT: Maximum output torque rating

(Numbers from January edition of Fourwheeler, page 60.)
Dana 35 rear axle COT: 870 MOT: 3480
Dana 44 rear axle COT: 1100 MOT: 4460
Ford 8.8 28spline COT: 1250 MOT: 4600
Ford 8.8 31spline COT: 1360 MOT: 5100
Dana60 semifloat COT: 1500 MOT: 5500]
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post #22 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 08:41 PM
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Been done. Downgrade.
Didn't say anything about it being preferable, just curious which direction would be easier, putting leafs on a frame or springs on an axle.
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post #23 of 108 Old 06-08-2019, 08:46 PM
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Also a big part of the swap is getting disc brake rears and I feel like some people overlook the benefits of that by itself.
Saving an hour every few years when you do a brake job isn't a huge benefit. Other than that, there is no real advantage of rear disc brakes - they stop the same.
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post #24 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 05:00 AM
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Yeah that’s why we are all using front Dana 44s or Dana 60s with drum brakes.

https://youtu.be/v57K1WW41K8
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post #25 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 06:32 AM
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Yeah thatís why we are all using front Dana 44s or Dana 60s with drum brakes.

https://youtu.be/v57K1WW41K8
The D44 that was originally in my TJ came from the factory with drum brakes.
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post #26 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 06:51 AM
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Your front 44 or 30? Stock, from the factory? I bet not. I wonder why...
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post #27 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 07:03 AM
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Your front 44 or 30? Stock, from the factory? I bet not. I wonder why...
I would say the front is more a question of benefiting from larger braking surface and not a question of disc v. drum functionality. But when rear disc conversions are done the pads/calipers there are not large.
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post #28 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 07:23 AM
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So a rear disc conversion gains the same stopping power as drums with a smaller pad and rotor? How does that work? What if I use larger pads and rotors and bigger calipers? Or should I just get bigger drums and shoes? You must think closed knuckles and radius arms are sweet too.
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post #29 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 08:24 AM
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So a rear disc conversion gains the same stopping power as drums with a smaller pad and rotor? How does that work? What if I use larger pads and rotors and bigger calipers? Or should I just get bigger drums and shoes? You must think closed knuckles and radius arms are sweet too.
How much more stopping area do rear disc conversion pads/calipers realistically have than drums? My current rear axle has explorer brakes and the pads/calipers are half the size of my fronts. There is no need for big stopping power in the rear. In fact you end up with issues if you have too much rear stopping power.

As you point out there is a limit to how big drums can be and so in a front application where more stopping surface is required a disc is used. But it is used to get more stopping area, not because the disc is inherently better than the drum. It is a question of packaging.
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post #30 of 108 Old 06-09-2019, 08:29 AM
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So a rear disc conversion gains the same stopping power as drums with a smaller pad and rotor? How does that work? What if I use larger pads and rotors and bigger calipers? Or should I just get bigger drums and shoes? You must think closed knuckles and radius arms are sweet too.
You have to understand that the brake pressure sent to the rear brakes, drum or disk, is reduced substantially by the brake proportioning valve under heavy braking force. That is done to prevent the rear brakes from locking up which happens far more easily in the rear due to them unweighting during hard braking. Locking the rear brakes up can produce slides, skids, or worse.

Even drum brakes work so effectively in the rear that the brake pressure has to be reduced to them via the brake proportioning valve. The harder you step on the brake pedal, the more the proportioning valve reduces the pressure sent to the rear brakes. So if you're already limiting the braking force sent to properly performing rear drums via the brake proportioning valve, installing even more powerful brakes in the rear will not do a thing to improve overall braking performance. Upgrade the front brakes to improve braking performance, not the rear.

There is no significant braking performance difference when the rear brakes are drum or disk. Rear disk brakes are easier to work on, that's the only real benefit to them in the rear.

When you have a choice, buy American made.
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