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85Tuxedocj7 06-09-2021 07:27 AM

4 bbl carb on wrong?
 
3 Attachment(s)
I think I found why my engine feels weak.

Below are images of my carb and a photo of the same intake I am running.

the Intake appears to have a divided plenum, when my dad and I (I was about 13) put it together, the carb was turned so that the throttle linkage was facing the fire wall and the electric choke was facing the radiator. I pulled the carb off to clean and rebuild it and noticed the intake ports closest to to the engine were sooty while the other two were shiny as new.

the primaries were over the outside ports, while the secondary's were over the engine-side ports... Dad said it felt like the "four barrel would never open."

Would the carb being turned the wrong direction have seriously stunted the power?

notice how my secondary's are dirty while the primaries are shiny?

Hurricane4 06-09-2021 10:43 AM

What brand/model of carb & intake?

jeepdaddy2000 06-09-2021 07:28 PM

One primary barrel on each side of the plenum.
One secondary barrel on each side of the plenum.

BagusJeep 06-09-2021 08:42 PM

I am surprised it even ran.

JEEPFELLER 06-09-2021 08:55 PM

3 Attachment(s)
I'm a bit lost on the orientation of your carb.

My Holley 390 sits on the 258 with the primaries against the valve cover and the secondary's facing the driver's fender

This being on an Offenhauser intake.

A better description is that it is sitting "Sideways" on the intake for the throttle and such to work out.

Along with this "ODD" configuration is the rearward slant of the engine

This slant messes up the Holley's internal fuel level and the adjustments, as one primary barrel and one secondary barrel is leaning lower on the slanted intake.

Nothing is "EVEN", precise adjustments are almost impossible.

HOWEVER

I had a plastic spacer machined to compensate for the slant---thus making the carb level again

I have a couple of pics of it in the forum

Here's one in this link (crammed with info)

https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/c...258-a-4408347/

In pic 1) notice the air cleaner is "Level" compared to the rear slanting valve cover---thanks to the slanted spacer

Pic 2) compare the valve cover----the spacer is plainly seen in this pic

-----JEEPFELLER

KevinCJ7Jeep 06-09-2021 09:04 PM

Is it my bad eyes or is that a spread bore carb and a square bore intake

gutthans 06-09-2021 09:40 PM

Depending upon the year of the OFFY manifold, I believe the mounting pad area was changed to a 6* slant to compensate for AMC 258 engine tilt (4*- 6*). (Maybe a number of owners machined the pads themselves? but I believe it was a factory modification. A machined spacer (as noted earlier) will do the same on the earlier models.

The dual plane configuration SHOULD be run with the primaries both facing the valve cover, NOT STRADDLING both plenums. The reason is fairly obvious: The fuel charge will travel different distances at different velocities (and I believe it is correct that each side will run slightly leaner than if they both dump into the same plenum portion). They will both wind up in the chamber, however...and without a dyno you may not/won't notice much difference.

And yes, that does look a bit like a GM spread-bore???

KevinCJ7Jeep 06-09-2021 09:49 PM

60 Attachment(s)
Maybe not my eyes then. That would explain why the secondaries aren’t opening. I believe the secondaries are dirty because they could not open and no gas passing thru them and also cleaning them

jeepdaddy2000 06-09-2021 11:49 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinCJ7Jeep (Post 41289817)
Is it my bad eyes or is that a spread bore carb and a square bore intake

Square bore.Looks like a Carter AFB
Quote:

The dual plane configuration SHOULD be run with the primaries both facing the valve cover, NOT STRADDLING both plenums.
The barrels ALWAYS straddle the plenum. The plenum separates the planes, which are set up so the runners are as equal in length as possible. Enclosed is a picture of a V8 dual plane manifold. Look closely at the separate planes and the runners they feed. If the carb is orientated so the primaries are both on a single plane, then both barrels will feed only 3 cylinders(6 cyl) or 4 cylinders (V8).

mudbfun 06-10-2021 03:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gutthans (Post 41289847)

The dual plane configuration SHOULD be run with the primaries both facing the valve cover, NOT STRADDLING both plenums. The reason is fairly obvious: The fuel charge will travel different distances at different velocities (and I believe it is correct that each side will run slightly leaner than if they both dump into the same plenum portion). They will both wind up in the chamber, however...and without a dyno you may not/won't notice much difference.


That is incorrect. The purpose of a dual plane is to divide the work of each primary/secondary barrel and increase the intake velocity. In other words each plane only feeds 3 cylinders. That provides better low end torque. If both primarys are on the same plane then they will both only be feeding half of the engine!



Even if the intake is a square bore and the carb is a spread bore, it wont matter as long as the manifold is big enough to accommodate the larger secondaries.



PS. Loose the spacer if possible. Dyno tests have proven them to be a negative power accessory.

John Strenk 06-10-2021 03:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeepdaddy2000 (Post 41289895)
Square bore.Looks like a Carter AFB

The barrels ALWAYS straddle the plenum. The plenum separates the planes, which are set up so the runners are as equal in length as possible. Enclosed is a picture of a V8 dual plane manifold. Look closely at the separate planes and the runners they feed. If the carb is orientated so the primaries are both on a single plane, then both barrels will feed only 3 cylinders(6 cyl) or 4 cylinders (V8).

That would be true with an ordinary split plenum setup where one plenum feeds 1/2 the cylinders evenly but the Offey split PLANE manifold is a little different.

[off topic]Actually you want the cylinders to draw air evenly, You do not want 3 cylinders in a row drawing air/fuel and then nothing for a revolution while the other plenum isn't supplying any mixture for a while and then suddenly needs to supply a lot. It cuts the momentum of the air flowing through the carb messing up the mixture. Equal runner manifolds are a little different design than the one pictured. [/off topic]

https://www.whiteowlspeed.com/wp-con...oBackgroud.jpg

https://www.whiteowlspeed.com/wp-con.../09/5999DP.jpg

The plenum is split where each plenum is feeding all the cylinders. the narrower passages are for the primaries to keep the flow moving fast for better throttle response while the large ones are for the secondaries where large amounts of flow are needed.

So you would want you primaries on the smaller side and secondaries on the larger side.


Quote:

Originally Posted by gutthans (Post 41289847)
Depending upon the year of the OFFY manifold, I believe the mounting pad area was changed to a 6* slant to compensate for AMC 258 engine tilt (4*- 6*). (Maybe a number of owners machined the pads themselves? but I believe it was a factory modification. A machined spacer (as noted earlier) will do the same on the earlier models.

The dual plane configuration SHOULD be run with the primaries both facing the valve cover, NOT STRADDLING both plenums. The reason is fairly obvious: The fuel charge will travel different distances at different velocities (and I believe it is correct that each side will run slightly leaner than if they both dump into the same plenum portion). They will both wind up in the chamber, however...and without a dyno you may not/won't notice much difference.

And yes, that does look a bit like a GM spread-bore???

Looking at the pictures above. Looks like one manifold has the narrow passages on top and one manifold has the narrow passages on the bottom.
This would have a BIG effect on how the carburetor is mounted.

If you mixed up the primary and secondaries then you would have probably the same performance as a too tiny 2 barrel and when the secondaries opened up, they would have to squeeze through those narrow passages, ot doing much to increase performance.

If that is a spread bore carb then the secondaries would never open all the way.

The top one pictured above is for 81 and later as it has no provisions for heating the manifold and the thinner mounting pads.
The bottom one is for earlier 258's as it has a flange on the bottom so the exhaust manifold can attach to it so the exhaust can heat the bottom of the manifold and the mounting tabs are longer to bolt up to the stock exhaust manifold.

John Strenk 06-10-2021 04:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mudbfun (Post 41289941)
....

PS. Loose the spacer if possible. Dyno tests have proven them to be a negative power accessory.

I think that depends upon the manifold design.

On some manifolds it helps with smoothing the airflow out the carb giving it a chance to mix properly.

If the base of the carb is mounted on a manifold that instantly changes direction to the left and next instant to the right, you going to get different mixtures in either direction.

Smooth air flow out is just as important as smooth air flow in for "drivability"

If you only run at WOT then that changes everything also as opposed to driving to the grocery store during the week.

jeepdaddy2000 06-10-2021 05:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41289945)
That would be true with an ordinary split plenum setup where one plenum feeds 1/2 the cylinders evenly but the Offey split PLANE manifold is a little different.

I stand corrected and owe gutthans an apology.
My depth of knowledge of 4 and 6 barrel intakes is showing:oops:.

John Strenk 06-10-2021 07:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeepdaddy2000 (Post 41289957)
I stand corrected and owe gutthans an apology.
My depth of knowledge of 4 and 6 barrel intakes is showing:oops:.

Not a problem.

You should of seen the intake manifold on my Renault driven Lotus Europa.
One barrel of the single 45DCOE fed cylinders 2 and 3 while the other barrel fed cylinders 1 and 4.
SCCA did say you could run any 2bbl carb and still remain in stock classes. :D

Fourtrail 06-10-2021 08:44 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41289945)

https://www.whiteowlspeed.com/wp-con...oBackgroud.jpg

https://www.whiteowlspeed.com/wp-con.../09/5999DP.jpg

The plenum is split where each plenum is feeding all the cylinders. the narrower passages are for the primaries to keep the flow moving fast for better throttle response while the large ones are for the secondaries where large amounts of flow are needed.

So you would want you primaries on the smaller side and secondaries on the larger side.




Wherein lies part of the issue, the Edelbrock carb does have mechanical opening secondaries, but there is a weighted air valve between the venturi and the butterflies in the base plate. If you are not creating enough vacuum on the secondary side of the intake, the air valve will not open and no fuel will flow through. With the larger runners on the secondary side of the offenhauser intake, it is possible that you just aren't getting enough vacuum signal to open the secondary air valve. One option is to drill a small hole in each weight to reduce the mass so the secondary air valve will open/open quicker. Just don't go too much, then you are ordering a new secondary air valve if it opens too quick and causes the motor to stumble.


Image is of the air valve that sits between the venturies and the butterflies.

gutthans 06-10-2021 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mudbfun (Post 41289941)
That is incorrect. If both primarys are on the same plane then they will both only be feeding half of the engine!

John has already addressed this, but you should go back and look closer at the two manifold designs you are trying to compare. Your comment applies to the V-8 design where cylinders are opposed and that runner orientation is not at all what happens on a straight six!

pedal2themetai 06-10-2021 09:59 AM

Hi, I'm with Kevin CJ7.. It looks like a Spread bore carb and a square bore intake.. that's the first thing I saw.. Everyone keeps talking about orientation .. No matter how you orientate it its not going to work with that intake or adapter. You need a spread bore to square bore adapter to make it work.

Spread bore means that the secondary are bigger than the primary and Square bore all 4 openings are the same size

good luck
tim

Fourtrail 06-10-2021 10:11 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Not sure what people are seeing, but the carb is a square bore edelbrock performer/carter AFB. Definitely not a spread bore carb.


85Tuxedocj7, can you get a picture/the numbers from this location on the carb? That will tell us the size and give a starting point to if the carb is too big or other suggestions.

John Strenk 06-10-2021 10:24 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourtrail (Post 41290151)
Not sure what people are seeing, but the carb is a square bore edelbrock performer/carter AFB. Definitely not a spread bore carb.


85Tuxedocj7, can you get a picture/the numbers from this location on the carb? That will tell us the size and give a starting point to if the carb is too big or other suggestions.

It's hard to tell because of perspective aberration but if the gasket opening is trasoidial shaped then maybe it is a square bore but it appears the secondaries are a bit wider than the primaries comparing how close the secondaries comes to the edge of the remains of the gasket.

Attachment 3992083

There always is a chance of the secondaries are just wide enough to fit in the spacer openings and the primaries are smaller then the spacers opening so all the valves could work.

mudbfun 06-10-2021 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeepdaddy2000 (Post 41289957)
I stand corrected and owe gutthans an apology.
My depth of knowledge of 4 and 6 barrel intakes is showing:oops:.


Ditto. I defer to Johns expertise.



Re; the spread bore. It may be possible to overcome a carb to manifold mismatch via a different spacer. ??

Fourtrail 06-10-2021 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41290161)
It's hard to tell because of perspective aberration but if the gasket opening is trasoidial shaped then maybe it is a square bore but it appears the secondaries are a bit wider than the primaries comparing how close the secondaries comes to the edge of the remains of the gasket.

https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/atta...adbore-not.jpg

There always is a chance of the secondaries are just wide enough to fit in the spacer openings and the primaries are smaller then the spacers opening so all the valves could work.


Bad camera angle, that is an edelbrock square bore base plate. Plus any spread bore has an exaggerated difference between the primary and secondary butterflies.


https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/atta...wrong-carb.jpg


Edit: if it is a very early Carter AFB, there were a few that had slightly smaller primary butterflies, but they were still a square bore design and should work just fine with that manifold as the secondary butterflies are still smaller than the bore in the intake.

John Strenk 06-10-2021 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mudbfun (Post 41290163)
Ditto. I defer to Johns expertise.

That would be a mistake!! ;)


Quote:

Re; the spread bore. It may be possible to overcome a carb to manifold mismatch via a different spacer. ??
dont need one....

See fourtrail picture

John Strenk 06-10-2021 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourtrail (Post 41290171)
Bad camera angle, that is an edelbrock square bore base plate. Plus any spread bore has an exaggerated difference between the primary and secondary butterflies.


https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/atta...wrong-carb.jpg

Yeah, that looks like it.

Small difference in throttle plates size but center of throttle plates are 'square'

a spread bore has spacing of center of throttle plates way different. Not just size difference

mudbfun 06-10-2021 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gutthans (Post 41290119)
John has already addressed this, but you should go back and look closer at the two manifold designs you are trying to compare. Your comment applies to the V-8 design where cylinders are opposed and that runner orientation is not at all what happens on a straight six!


Affirmative. My apologies. That design is VERY different then the ones I am familiar with. Especially the narrower runners for the primaries. It will be important to get that orientation right. Learning is good! Thank you! :thumbsup:

pedal2themetai 06-10-2021 10:45 AM

HI .. I still say the carb is a spread bore.. Look at the center divider of the carb.. One is smaller than the other.. I have a square bore Edelbrock and just looked at the bottom and both are the same size. In his picture of the actual carb one is smaller than the other (spread bore).. My square bore also has 4 bolt down holes..

He needs a spread bore to square bore adapter

good luck
tim

mudbfun 06-10-2021 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pedal2themetai (Post 41290193)
HI .. I still say the carb is a spread bore.. Look at the center divider of the carb.. One is smaller than the other.. I have a square bore Edelbrock and just looked at the bottom and both are the same size. In his picture of the actual carb one is smaller than the other (spread bore).. My square bore also has 4 bolt down holes..

He needs a spread bore to square bore adapter

good luck
tim


All he needs to do is place the spacer on the carb upside down and try opening the butterfly's up. Ez issue to resolve.

Fourtrail 06-10-2021 10:51 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41290183)
It's hard to tell because of perspective aberration but if the gasket opening is trasoidial shaped then maybe it is a square bore but it appears the secondaries are a bit wider than the primaries comparing how close the secondaries comes to the edge of the remains of the gasket.


Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41290183)
Yeah, that looks like it.

Small difference in throttle plates size but center of throttle plates are 'square'

a spread bore has spacing of center of throttle plates way different. Not just size difference


Which is correct for the 'square flange' Edelbrock 500 cfm carb. either way, it still should not need a spread bore adapter as the butterflies are still smaller than the intake bores. That carb is designed to bolt directly to a square bore intake.


https://www.edelbrock.com/performer-...-egr-1404.html

John Strenk 06-10-2021 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pedal2themetai (Post 41290193)
HI .. I still say the carb is a spread bore.. Look at the center divider of the carb.. One is smaller than the other.. I have a square bore Edelbrock and just looked at the bottom and both are the same size. In his picture of the actual carb one is smaller than the other (spread bore).. My square bore also has 4 bolt down holes..

He needs a spread bore to square bore adapter

good luck
tim

I think the primaries are probably smaller than the opening in the manifold and the secondaries probably match the opening perfectly.

A spread bore adapter are much much bigger
https://static.summitracing.com/glob...2034_hb_xl.jpg

The throttle plates would not line up.

Fourtrail 06-10-2021 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41290205)
I think the primaries are probably smaller than the opening in the manifold and the secondaries probably match the opening perfectly.


Covered in my post just before yours, come on keep up John...:grin2:

mudbfun 06-10-2021 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Strenk (Post 41289947)
I think that depends upon the manifold design.

On some manifolds it helps with smoothing the airflow out the carb giving it a chance to mix properly.

If the base of the carb is mounted on a manifold that instantly changes direction to the left and next instant to the right, you going to get different mixtures in either direction.

Smooth air flow out is just as important as smooth air flow in for "drivability"

If you only run at WOT then that changes everything also as opposed to driving to the grocery store during the week.


Most of my engine performance know how is from working on Chevy small blocks. Clearly not everything is equal across the board, but some basic things will always apply.

I agree that in some cases they could be beneficial for better fuel atomization and distribution depending on the manifold, carb and so on. Either way I dont think the performance difference from a spacer is anything earth shattering though, and in most cases it is hardly noticeable. If it were just a case of getting the carb height correct for the purpose of attachments I wouldn't hesitate to use one.

John Strenk 06-10-2021 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourtrail (Post 41290209)
Covered in my post just before yours, come on keep up John...:grin2:

i t y p e t o o s l o o o w . . . . https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/cust...tar49393_2.gif

pedal2themetai 06-10-2021 11:32 AM

HI Ok.. I see that now the outsides of the barrels are the same distance and the oversize was taking to the center.. My bad... so maybe he needs to adjust the spring on the secondairs so they open..
good luck
tim

Fourtrail 06-10-2021 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourtrail (Post 41290071)
Wherein lies part of the issue, the Edelbrock carb does have mechanical opening secondaries, but there is a weighted air valve between the venturi and the butterflies in the base plate. If you are not creating enough vacuum on the secondary side of the intake, the air valve will not open and no fuel will flow through. With the larger runners on the secondary side of the offenhauser intake, it is possible that you just aren't getting enough vacuum signal to open the secondary air valve. One option is to drill a small hole in each weight to reduce the mass so the secondary air valve will open/open quicker. Just don't go too much, then you are ordering a new secondary air valve if it opens too quick and causes the motor to stumble.

https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/atta...dsc00181-l.jpg
Image is of the air valve that sits between the venturies and the butterflies.

Quote:

Originally Posted by pedal2themetai (Post 41290245)
HI Ok.. I see that now the outsides of the barrels are the same distance and the oversize was taking to the center.. My bad... so maybe he needs to adjust the spring on the secondairs so they open..
good luck
tim


Unless the OP has a Thunder AVS carb,which uses springs, the secondaries on the 500cfm performer are controlled by these weights and vacuum to pull open the air valve.

85Tuxedocj7 06-11-2021 02:02 PM

probably around 30,000 miles lol and ran until i parked it for 6 years. water jacket cracked outside the waterpump and i sealed it with 3M 5200 sealant and it held for 2 years of daily driving.

85Tuxedocj7 06-11-2021 02:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourtrail (Post 41290151)
Not sure what people are seeing, but the carb is a square bore edelbrock performer/carter AFB. Definitely not a spread bore carb.


85Tuxedocj7, can you get a picture/the numbers from this location on the carb? That will tell us the size and give a starting point to if the carb is too big or other suggestions.

It is a 1403

85Tuxedocj7 06-11-2021 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fourtrail (Post 41290171)
Bad camera angle, that is an edelbrock square bore base plate. Plus any spread bore has an exaggerated difference between the primary and secondary butterflies.


https://www.jeepforum.com/forum/atta...wrong-carb.jpg


Edit: if it is a very early Carter AFB, there were a few that had slightly smaller primary butterflies, but they were still a square bore design and should work just fine with that manifold as the secondary butterflies are still smaller than the bore in the intake.

I think it's Square bore, the primaries are smaller than the secondary's but it fits a square bore spacer.

BagusJeep 06-14-2021 01:57 AM

A 1403 is a square bore so that is sorted. In fact it is the carb that Offenhauser recommend for this setup BUT they go on to say use one from 400 to 600 cfm for street to race applications.

I have never raced my Jeep so I am unsure about the 600cfm but my concern at a 1403 is that it is rated at 500cfm. WADR to Offenhauser, the physics suggest on a trail rig it is oversize.

The 258 will, on a good day, run to 4000rpm but unlikely you would want to go much above 3000rpm. At 80% volumetric efficiency this is 180 to 240 cfm, the carb is MUCH larger than a 258 in stock form needs, it would run fine on just the primaries.

Different manufacturers measure and rate their carbs in different ways apparently so it is difficult for complete comparison.

I took this from the Edelbrock manual as they write so well:

The Secondary Main System delivers fuel only when the secondary throttle blades and air valve are open. It ensures that fuel delivery varies with air flow.

The Secondary Throttles begin to open when the Primaries are about 65% open. The Primary and Secondary Throttles arrive at the WOT stop at the same time.

Air flow through the Secondary side is controlled by Air Valves. These valves are located in the secondary bores above the throttle blades. They are balanced against a counter weight and open to admit additional air flow only if there is enough air velocity to allow the proper operation of the Secondary Metering Systems.


In other words, you need to open the secondary throttles AND there needs to be enough air flow as Fourtrail set out above, and with low flows that is not as likely to happen. They could be sticking of course.

Have you checked the secondary throttle butterflies start to open at 65% of the primaries an dare open at 100%? There is a mechanical linkage which could be out of whack.

Then give the air valve a prod, it should swing smoothly.

Apparently even the factory suggests getting a 1/8" drill and taking out a hole in the big lug part of the counterweight to get them to open sooner.

BagusJeep 06-14-2021 02:29 AM

Offenhauser say:

"The Dual Port 360 can best be described by saying itís actually two separate manifolds in one. The entire manifold is divided from the base of the carburetor to the head flange. In operation, the primary mixture is fed into the bottom runners and the engine operates on this smaller port until the engine demand cuts in the secondaries (the top port). In the Dual Port, the primary system further restricts the air flow after passing the carburetor and increases it to the speed of sound. This means that even at low engine RPM, it offers near perfect aerodynamic efficiency, which means MORE HORSEPOWER!!! This intake can gain you fuel economy while also adding 15-30% more power!


This extra horsepower on the primaries comes from a more perfect mixture moving at near sonic speeds, a larger volume passing the intake valve and greater turbulence in the combustion chamber for a highly efficient use of fuel. The primary system being on the bottom uniquely provides two layers of manifold casting and a high speed mixture flow which acts as a perfect insulator for the secondary runners. And since the secondaries are insulated from engine heat, this means that when cut in, the secondary mixture will be colder and more dense, a further increase in performance. Then, when the secondary mixture gets to the end of the runner, it is picked up and rammed into the combustion chamber by the sonic velocity of the primary port. All of this means less fuel to gain more horsepower. Also, this intake is proven to lower emissions due to its efficiency in mixing air / fuel.

Uses standard 4bbl carb from 400 CFM to 600 CFM depending on whether itís for street or competition.

Works great with the Edelbrock 1403 500cfm carburetor!

**NOTES:

Works with stock exhaust manifolds, and also works with headers (except Borla or Clifford brand headers).
Includes linkage kit, which works with stock stamped steel bracket off stock intake.
The carb will be mounted sideways, and there is a cable and bracket to the carb included in the kit."



Heck, sonic primaries and ramming!!!!!

I don't suppose the OP has any vacuum measurements?

gutthans 06-14-2021 08:55 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by BagusJeep (Post 41292811)
Offenhauser say:

**NOTES:
...works with headers (except Borla or Clifford brand headers).

Just because it's in print...doesn't make it so. Pic of Clifford headers with Offenhauser manifold. That's my 'go to' on conversion and stroker motors.

skypilot123 06-15-2021 05:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BagusJeep (Post 41289801)
I am surprised it even ran.

Amazing!

How did you do that???

It looks like you rotated it 90 degree's and got it to bolt up. Half your cylinders got no fuel and the other got it all. Hope you didn't wash away your rings.


The time now is 10:32 PM.

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