2008 WK tranny cooling lines replacement after action review - JeepForum.com
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post #1 of 3 Old 12-18-2018, 12:04 AM Thread Starter
Bob2008WK
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2008 WK 
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: westerly
Posts: 16
2008 WK tranny cooling lines replacement after action review

So I just replaced my rusted out tranny cooling lines; I found several posts with questions, not so much answers, so here is my experience. Disclaimer; it worked for me, but I am not a mechanic. Proceed with caution at your own risk.
Supplies used: -New cooling lines, $96; (2) new tranny fittings, $20 / ea; (3) quarts Zerex G-05 antifreeze concentrate; (1) gallon distilled H2O; ~16 oz of ATF+4.
-Remove grill (6 push pins on top)
-Remove air box intake (removing air filter & depressing tab simplifies removal)
-Remove lower radiator hose from radiator & drain; approximately 6 quarts will be lost
-Remove upper radiator hose from radiator
(If you don't have a remote reach hose clamp tool, I recommend you invest in one; much easier to latch the tool to the clamp, then squeeze the pistol grip on the other end of the cable to release the clamp, and it holds the clamp open)
-Unplug the cooling fan, remove the (4) 10 MM bolts from the shroud, and lift the shroud & fan out the top.
-Remove the clips from the tranny cooling line quick release fittings at the cooler / condenser unit. I invested in the Lisle tool, there was so much corrosion it took a bit of effort to get the clips even lifted a bit, then I pried them off from the top with a scribe.
-Pull the fittings back out of the condenser / tranny cooler assembly. Note: mine were severely corroded in; I soaked them in PB blaster, tapped on the line, etc to loosen a couple times a day- it took 48 hrs to get any movement out of the top one, 72 before it came free; the bottom fitting took 96 hours to move, and 120 to come free. Patience is cheaper than damaging a cooler / condenser unit...
-Remove the lines from the tranny. Since on my New England vehicle they were severely corroded, I cut the lines at the tranny to not waste time trying to remove them.
-Using a 1" socket, remove the fittings. On the driver side, a breaker bar provided enough torque & reach; on the passenger side, it required a flex head ratchet to gain access; fortunately I had a stubby flex head 1/2" ratchet, it proved a perfect fit into an 18" long piece of galvanized pipe for a cheater bar; reaching between the left & right exhaust before where they combine allowed breaking it free & ratcheting it out. The stubby allowed ratcheting the old fitting out once broken free & the new fitting in by reaching up past the exhaust, until the extra torque of the cheater bar was required to finish tightening.
-The new fittings were filled with some kind of grease; I cleaned this out before installation, since there were yellow plugs to keep the fittings clean anyway, not sure what function it is intended to serve, but guessing keeping foreign material out of the tranny.
-Remove the plastic hanger clip by popping out of the block; remove the lines by flexing the old lines back behind the radiator & back out of the way, then move the lines forward until they drop out.
-Install the new lines by passing between the cross member & front axle into the engine bay; flex the rubber lines back to allow moving far enough forward to clear the cross member, then pass back into position by the tranny. Then move the front fittings by the radiator into place. (I removed the radiator bolts to allow the radiator to lean backwards to gain more clearance to get the lines past the radiator; this had little effect and I don't think really helped)
-Pop in the (4) fittings & snap the "dust caps" in place to keep the clips in (I had to use a scribe to clean the lands out so the clips would fit in flush, necessary for the dust covers to snap on)(I lubed thee barb with silicon grease to protect the O-rings)
-Install the old clip back to the engine block & clip to the new lines
-Reinstall the fan & shroud assembly
-Reattach the radiator hoses; re-fill the radiator.
-Add some ATF+4 to replace what was lost
-Run up to temp; it will still be short ~ 2 quarts of coolant, so be careful to not overheat. Once up to temp, grab the upper radiator hose with both (gloved) hands & squeeze to force the air bubble out; if you have bubbles exiting the radiator into the overflow tank, it is working. It will take a couple heating & cooling cycles to purge the cooling system of air. Keep the overflow tank filled during this process.
-Check tranny level. I have a "dip stick" I purchased on line years ago; it is just a length of stainless steel cable with a couple of crimps to mark the correct temp. range. Doorman now makes one that has fluid levels; I found one under $10 on Ebay. Correct tranny level is determined by temp; I ran it until the cooling line to the cooler got hot (thermostat opened) & then checked level. Here is the correct range at various tranny temps: at 70 degrees, 20 mm; at 180 degrees, 65 mm; at 200 degrees 70 mm. I taped a thin rigid tube to the dipstick at 65 mm, then vacuumed out all surplus oil with an oil change pump (about 8 oz).
-I initially over filled the tranny by adding about 16 oz; this resulted in a spurious transmission over temp light after driving 2 miles on a 40 degree day (I determined this by finding a thread where someone had the same alarm after a dealer service, which was attributed to slightly too much oil)

Hopefully my experience will help someone with this process. Please add any comments if you have had a different experience.

SillyDude and 2008HemiXK like this.

Last edited by Bob2008WK; 12-18-2018 at 10:31 AM. Reason: correct spelling errors / add info
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post #2 of 3 Old 09-20-2021, 06:59 PM
scott0720
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2005 WK 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 44
Great write up! Thanks! One question. Did you cut the lines at the transmission then remove the fittings there or did you just cut the lines and splice in the new lines to the older line? Thanks! Looking at having to do this soon!!!

Scott
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post #3 of 3 Old 09-20-2021, 07:24 PM
ravenworks
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2006 LJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: NE
Posts: 5,869
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott0720 View Post
Great write up! Thanks! One question. Did you cut the lines at the transmission then remove the fittings there or did you just cut the lines and splice in the new lines to the older line? Thanks! Looking at having to do this soon!!!

Scott
There's a few ways of doing new lines but you do know this is an old thread

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