Lubricate AC o-rings? - JeepForum.com
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 07:30 AM Thread Starter
wjkeith
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Lubricate AC o-rings?

Iíve located the leak in my ac system. Failed hose connection. I ordered the 3 hoses, expansion valve and a condenser.
Question: Do I put a bit of lubricant on the o-rings when putting this back together? I do so at work but we only have water, air and/or chemicals running through the lines. AC seems a bit more sensitive to outside interference.

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post #2 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 10:44 AM
Jeeples
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You can lube them up with a little PAG oil, otherwise I've always just cleaned the fitting real well and popped 'em in.

His: '00 WJ 4.7 Limited- Some stuff

Hers: '03 WJ 4.7 Laredo- Some more stuff


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post #3 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 01:39 PM
Boojo35
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They are supposed to be lubed with whatever oil the system uses is what is recommended. A lot of the newer designs are tolerant of being installed dry though.

If you cannot fix it with a hammer then it has to be an electrical problem.
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post #4 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 01:50 PM
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Like Jeeples said many will use PAG oil on AC connections/o-rings. But know many swear by Nylog Blue for a better seal which is a little higher tech. It should be available locally if you go that route and just using the below link for a description.

https://www.trutechtools.com/RT201B

Normally when opening up the AC system to replace parts it's also recommended to replace the filter/drier (accumulator) which likely has dirt and water in it. Not sure and maybe it's part of your 3 AC hose replacements... Good luck.

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post #5 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 02:39 PM
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Just FWIW, on the subject of accumulator replacement, I had to open up the AC in my 2002 Ford Escape last year. It was open (with screwed-up paper plugging the lines) for a week, then after I reassembled it it took another two weeks before I could get round to having it vacuumed and refilled.

I didn't replace the accumulator because I couldn't get a new one - replacements are completely unobtanium for the Escape in the UK. It was a very unpopular vehicle over here that was only sold for three years, Ford UK no longer has any AC parts stock and the aftermarket has nothing either. But the shop who vacuumed and recharged it for me said that in their experience it would probably be fine, and they were right. A year on, the AC is still cold.

Of course, you'll have no issues finding a new accumulator for the WJ, but it's worth knowing that it'll probably be just fine with the old one.
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post #6 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AVR2 View Post
Just FWIW, on the subject of accumulator replacement, I had to open up the AC in my 2002 Ford Escape last year. It was open (with screwed-up paper plugging the lines) for a week, then after I reassembled it it took another two weeks before I could get round to having it vacuumed and refilled.

I didn't replace the accumulator because I couldn't get a new one - replacements are completely unobtanium for the Escape in the UK. It was a very unpopular vehicle over here that was only sold for three years, Ford UK no longer has any AC parts stock and the aftermarket has nothing either. But the shop who vacuumed and recharged it for me said that in their experience it would probably be fine, and they were right. A year on, the AC is still cold.

Of course, you'll have no issues finding a new accumulator for the WJ, but it's worth knowing that it'll probably be just fine with the old one.
Properly evacuating an AC system will remove moisture. Finding a shop that is patient enough to do it long enough is another story.

Here is evacuation in a nutshell. Let start with the fact that most people understand that putting a radiator cap on that holds pressure raises the boiling point of the cooling system. Well, the reverse is also true. If you put water under a vacuum, it reduces the boiling point of water. After 29 inches HG of vacuum very small increment in the HG greatly reduce the boiling point of water. Water will boil at less than room temperature in a system that can hold a VERY good vacuum and a VERY good vacuum pump being used.

The keys are pulling a very good vacuum and leaving it on there for a good amount of time if the system has been opened up of totally empty. The default 10 minutes of some machines are not enough time in some instances.

The downsides of moisture in the system can be icing of the orifice or expansion valve which can have an effect on performance. It takes a lot of moisture to cause this. The second is a longer term issue. Freon and moisture combine to make a byproduct known as acid. Over the long term your system will rot from the inside out.

If you cannot fix it with a hammer then it has to be an electrical problem.
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post #7 of 7 Old 07-15-2019, 06:06 PM Thread Starter
wjkeith
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uniblurb View Post
Like Jeeples said many will use PAG oil on AC connections/o-rings. But know many swear by Nylog Blue for a better seal which is a little higher tech. It should be available locally if you go that route and just using the below link for a description.

https://www.trutechtools.com/RT201B

Normally when opening up the AC system to replace parts it's also recommended to replace the filter/drier (accumulator) which likely has dirt and water in it. Not sure and maybe it's part of your 3 AC hose replacements... Good luck.
Yes, the receiver/dryer is part of one of the hose assemblies. Iíll use pag oil to lube the o-rings. In work I use whatever I have. I keep a small container of petroleum jelly in my tool cart for this and have used dielectric grease in a pinch. Never an issue with either.
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