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post #91 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:17 PM Thread Starter
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Many thanks for the comments and glad it of help.


Now that I have the centre cross member in, I can now mount off it a mount for the front fuel tank strap. I cut this from the same strap my engine mounts were made from. 6mm thick and has the same curve in the corner as the fuel tank strap. It has been capped both ends and another gusset added in the middle which follow the edge of the pipe and welded solidly to it.


What I also thought was a good idea was to incorporate a centre body mount along the rear of the cab floor. I bought a complete set of rubber 64-67 Chevelle convertible. I much prefer rubber as it isolates the body better from and road or drive train vibration. Also far less stress on the body mounts themselves.


Used a holesaw to match the step in the rubber mount to keep it located. The recess in the bottom of the pressed cup will mean the bolt head is flush and leave plenty of room above the drive shaft


You will also notice two extra holes drilled in the mount. This is to hold the tank strap in place so there is no shear load on the body mounting rubber.


The strap get sandwiched with the lower rubber and mount underneath and the upper rubber above it.


This is what the body mount will bolt into. I decided against bolting the fuel tank strap directly to this as was concerned about fatigue long term with the other fuel tank mounts all being solidly mounted to the frame and the body rubber mounted. Now all fuel tank straps are mounted directly to the frame.


The fuel tank strap used to sit like this but now has been shortened the exact amount that the thickness of the upper rubber is so it can bolt directly to the frame rather than the rubber mounted body.

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post #92 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:34 PM Thread Starter
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Took the fuel tank out so I could weld in the last cross member I made.


Can see how there is plenty of clearance over the twin 2.75" Mopar/Corsa cat back system.


I made up a little gusset under the cross member to the top of the upper control arm mount. It adds support to the bracket and I could never get a weld in under there as too tight. Now it is all sealed up.


Decided to add a K member to the frame. This is a requirement should I ever decide to go on street rod club registration here. Its function is to stop the frame trying to turn into a parallelogram under heavy acceleration. Can't compress a triangle.


K member ties into the upper control arm mount and the new gussets I had just fitted too.


The back of the the K member is gusseted, mainly to serve as a mount for the centre fuel tank support.


Can see the reason for the bends in the K member now as it had to go over the fuel tank.


Another thing I did was round the outer corners of the big cross member. Just was annoying me that is looked to 'cut off' compared to the rest of it. Can see how it was on one of the other photos above. As it was already in place, I just cut the corner away and added in a piece from some 4" pipe I had.


Well that only leaves the very front cross member still to do. Will fit that after I have the front clip mounted and the radiator in position to make sure it doesn't interfere with them.
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post #93 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
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Time to start a bit of work on the firewall and floor from the 2008 Jeep Grand Cherokee donor. Having pulled out most of the damage from the impact into this corner from the Harley rider hitting it, wanted to see if I could get it any smoother.


This was the extent of the damage originally at the firewall to toe board seam that you might remember. The firewall/floor is upside down so you are looking from the bottom down.


The crease in the toe board.


These are the tools I have recently bought to smooth out the panel. This is all pretty new to me as learnt my welding trade in the structural steel industry. That and blacksmithing doesn't deal with light thin sheet metal. Even when I worked building aerofoil impellers etc, the parts I made were formed in huge presses, so very little hand forming.


Using the slapping file with the dolly behind it, can see how the imprints from the serrations are pushing down the high spots while the dolly brings up the low ones.


You just keep at it until the low spots also show the marks.


With a very light sand with some 120 grit, it is looking much better. I went a bit further after this shot was taken until I was happy enough with it.


Need to smooth out the firewall as well from the same damage.


Was a bit harder due to the pressings as well.


I have well over 200 spot weld holes to fill so need to scrape off the sound deadening panels so the rubber/ bitumen doesn't melt and contaminant the welds.


I noticed the right side had been pulled back as well from the impact. You can see the difference in the jack length that the left one is longer before any tension has been used. The left one is just there to stop the whole lot just twisting. I jacked the right side until both were the same after the tension was released. Got it right on in the end.


The rear most part of the floor had this pressed in which I didn't want. I will be turning up a flange right along where the floor was cut so it can be welded to the rear wall.


A couple of hits with a dead blow did was I was expecting and showed how much extra material I need to work out. Just hamming away at it would only stretch it more so it needs to be shrunk.


Going to try out a shrinking disc for the first time. Not sure if they are made to reduce this amount of material though. They make friction without thinning the steel. Then you quickly used a wet rag or compressed air to cool it and cause the shrinking. Here is a demo of the same one I bought.


Well it reduced the excess noticeably but not enough. Think this was just too much for a shrinking disc. Least I am learning what it is capable of. Might have been better to start with a puckering bar. Have to make one and give that a go one day.


I then used a propane torch to reduce it further but still had a bit left. So cut a slot with the jigsaw and you can see how it closed up along the edge. I welded this closed and the heat from that drew it in even more.


Did one more slot and sitting much flatter. I had also welded up the spot weld holes to help with the shrinking too. Just needs a bit more dressing up and should be good after the flange is folded I think.
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post #94 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:40 PM Thread Starter
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Dressed it up the best I could so it was better, but not happy with the part closest to the oval hole as has pin holes from welding up the holes that were there.


I cut out that section and replaced it. Welded from the top of one tack and used a short stitch weld to the top of the next one as get less pin holes this way I have found. The top of the patch has been curved to reduce the distortion you get from using a right angled corner. Less concentration of heat this way.


To remove the same pressing on the other side, I simple cut each side of it and then flatten it out. The excess went under the rest of the metal.


Cut the excess away and then welded up the slots. This was much quicker and much less distortion than the other side.


I used the same technique to shorten these ridges as well.


Had a go at hammering around the end of the pressings to make them round like the other end of them.


Now I want to tip a 15 mm flange all the way along the end of the cut floor so it can then be plug welded to the back of the rear wall of the cab. So I grabbed some 35 mm thick chip board that I had cut out when I fitted the new kitchen sink during the renovations inside the house. Just ran a pencil along the floor and then cut along the line using a jigsaw.


Used some sash clamps to fasten it over the end of the floor leaving 15 mm sticking out. I was fortunate that this all needed to be straight. You could curve it though if thinner board was used.


Started in the middle of the straight sections and worked outwards. Only tipping it a small way keeping it even. Clamps were in the way to tip the whole length at once, so did it in sections.


On the outer corners used this more domed head to reduce hammer marks.


This end was used along the straight sections until it was tipped over to about 45*.


Used a flatter hammer to do the last of it. You will always have some puckering on the inside corners where the metal needs to gather. Manufactures some times reduce the size of the flange at the corners to reduce this if needed.


All worked out well and using the board made sure the floor did not change its shape when bending at all the curves.


As the board was a bit short, the last part was bent over separately.


Started to weld up over 200 pilot holes from where the spot welds were drilled out.


To grind down the welds I use a flap disc. No bluing of the metal this way so shows less heat introduced. To get the most out of the discs I grind the edge away to get rid of the worn away paper on the ends. I have both grinders running at the same time and bevel the edge like shown.
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post #95 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
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Not much to add this week but thought I might as well put up some thing.


Finished filling all the holes in the floor and firewall. I found the best way was welding them up, using some copper under the larger ones, then flipping it over and tacking any pin holes and low spots. It is much easier doing it this way before doing any grinding as you have more thickness to work with. I would then grind one side flat, tapping down any distortion before then grinding the other side flat. Used just a flap disc but could use a grinder too. Just spent a few seconds on each weld before moving to the next one. After a few come back to the first and do a bit more. This keeps the heat down low and stops it pulling downwards.


Time to visit the old cabs. I was hoping to use the centre of the rear wall from the 48 and its two front corners. The 58 above to provide the the remaining so I could cut each piece larger than stock so when put back together give me the longer and wider cab I want to build. This gives me the smallest number of seams, but there is just too much rust in the lower front corners of the 48. So will use the 48 for the centre both front and rear and the 58 for all the corners. Can make the extra width up this way with only two seams each end but will have to add a separate piece to lengthen the cab.


Here is the front body mounts I need to cut free to add to the donor firewall. Scraped away the dirt and found them still to be solid.


My stash of front guards.
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post #96 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:48 PM Thread Starter
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Got the seat riser out and have stripped everything from the firewall on the 58. Taken out the windscreen and rear window etc too. Might be worth selling even?


This is the seat riser. Had the sand the paint away to find the spot welds along the back and flanges.


Was checking to see which front corner to use and a few prods with a screwdriver on the 48 and this thick piece of bog fell off! Looks like they had repaired it but did not try to hammer the welds to stretch it back into shape. I will use the corners from the 58 which has less rust damage but still some as you would expect from an old farm truck.


Going to remove the floor braces to transfer them over to the new floor panels.


Decided to throw the donor floor/firewall onto the frame to see how it all lined up.


Can see here the flanged that I turned up. It is nicely parallel with the cross member. I have left a 32mm/1-1/4" gap between the rear of the cab and the cross member.


Have the firewall sitting the exact distance it was in the donor from the back of the heads. The floor is sitting on 1" thick board to get the same gap as the stock Willys had between the top of the frame and underside of floor. This will leave enough room for the stock floor braces to be fitted as well.


Plenty of clearance for the headers on both sides.


Exhaust and the cat shield have plenty of space.


The floor is resting on the fuel tank pads as needed. The cross member clears the floor and the mount lines up under the threaded insert so I can use it as a body mount. The gap is for the rubber isolator.
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post #97 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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Got the front body mounts off as well and the floor stiffeners for under the doors. The other short ones go near the front of the cab from the sill stiffeners to the transmission tunnel. Thinking of adding another set from the other cab at the rear of the cab and use them for the body mounts.


Put a wire wheel in my grinder to clean away the paint to show up the spot welds in the roof gutter. Also showed up some rust as well. The other side had been repaired with a arc welder so will make removing the roof skin harder.


Roof all unpicked. So far the other roof skin looks better so hopefully be able to use more of that. I want to pancake the roof an inch or so anyway but also need to make it nearly 9" wider and 7-8" longer.


Looks like it has had a roof chop already. My plan is to lower the whole front and rear windows 2" not changing their height. Not sure if that is sectioning or a roof chop? The side window frames will end up 2" shorter as well which will make them the same height as the front windscreen. Was going to go 3" originally but worried it would look too low as widening the cab already lowers it visually.

First floor out. This one has a better floor but the firewall had been butchered for a V8 conversion. The other floor is rusted out but has most of the original firewall intact. Won't be needing them anyway.


To make the cab 9" wider, I will probably cut each side of the cowl vent on this 58 cab and use the outer corners. On the 48 cab I will cut 4.5" past each side of the vent and use the centre section. Then join them back together.


Not a lot left. Did find some rust that will have to be cut out above the door openings. It is 3 layers thick there for some reason and water has gotten in between when the gutter rusted out.
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post #98 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:20 PM Thread Starter
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Not much to show in the way of progress this week as went to a car hill climb event and spent some quality time with my wife. She has been painting inside the house nearly every weekend since January, so time for a bit of a break.

Hopefully I won't bore you with some set out photos for the chop.


You would think it would be easy marking out a 50 mm/2" section to remove to lower the front screen and roof down by. It is if perfectly vertical. But the front of the cab is not as has a compound curve right across the front as curving in both directions. Also the steepness changes as well which effects it again. It is steeper at each end compared to a shallower angle in the middle. So to get the same vertical drop evenly right across, the amount to cut out when measured flat along the steel face, will be less at the ends and more out of the middle. None of it will be 50 mm/2" as not vertical anywhere. I thought the easiest way to do it was use a laser level and spent time setting it up perfectly level and then levelled the cab with it.


You can see along the cab where I marked the top of the laser dot every 20 mm or so. To get the lower mark I simply held the ruler exactly vertical and with the top of the dot at 50 mm/2", then marked at the bottom of the ruler. Lowered the laser level until it lined up with the lower mark and repeated the marking for the bottom line.


Bit hard to see because you are fighting perspective here, but the lines are not parallel and get further apart in the middle compared to the steeper ends where it is closer together. Just got to see it as a right angled triangle. The sheet metal is the hypotenuse. As the angle changes, but keeping the same vertical height, the length of the hypotenuse alters. Ended up showing a 8 mm-5/16" difference between the middle and ends. That would have been a lot of extra grinding had I just ran some 2" tape along the front!


When it came to going around the corner, I will cut at the upper level line so I can stay above the change in angle from the lower vertical to the angled screen.


Unfortunately I can't cut all the way through the pillar at that height as would end up above the window sill around the back. It will have to be stepped down at one point.


To see where the best place to cut was I found it necessary to remove the welded in dash. Was quite a job getting it out as could not see the spot welds up under the dash holding it in or get a drill up in there anyway.


Can see a made a bit of a mess with the air chisel so this piece will need to be repaired or replaced.


Fortunately the damaged piece needed to be removed anyway so I could see the best way to cut a section out. Also this is the only way I would be able to weld it all back together again and get full welds on every face. As the outer skin wraps around this pillar on the outside creating two layers, there would be no way to weld the inner pillar face without cutting a piece of the body away or accessing it like this.


I have got some damage to repair as well as looks like a big gust of wind caught the door, or it was let go on a steep side angle at one point. It ripped the door stop attachment point clean out and then caused the tearing of the hinge hole and a long crease all the way down the panel. Access is going to be difficult as the pillar is in the way on the inside and only a small gap in-between.


The top of the roof has a bad section above the door opening too. I have decided to wait with cutting this cab apart until the other one is stripped as well and see if I can mix and match the best parts possible in the lengthening and widening process.


Another hack job found where a plate was held behind the hole and then arc welded and filled with bog. Want to weld shut this cowl seam anyway as its position does not line up with anything like the top of the guard or bottom edge of the bonnet. The very first year of production in 47, the year before my 48 cab, the factory did not have this seam. Not sure if the cowl was pressed as one or they joined it by another method or just leaded over it? Every cab from 48 on has this seam.
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post #99 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:23 PM Thread Starter
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Been having a hell of a time stripping the 48 cab. There are just so many more welds in places that the other cab never had. Also made worse when a rough floor repair has been welded straight over the top of the factory spot welds so have to try and cut away that first. Even the roof skin was harder and this photo shows the 48 leaning in front of the 58 one. There are just so many more spot welds as you can see. The 58 cab roof skin had 89 spots welds, but the 48 had 206! Maybe what stopped it from rusting as the upper half is in way better condition, but afraid the lower half is riddled with rust.
So will try and use as much from the upper 48 cab as I can to replace the rusty upper section of the 58.


Got some FJ40 Landcruiser vents and cast hinges to use in my build. Also the two pieces along the bottom are the Willys floor stiffeners.


Just showing a close up of a before picture as going to try stripping the rust.


Another before shot.


I am soaking the rusty parts in pure white vinegar to try out. Cider vinegar is supposed to be a bit better but costs a lot more. Didn't buy quite enough so will add more. Can already see a difference after 2 days.


After just 2 days as the angled line shows where it was immersed to. Some pieces showed more change than others this early.


Was told citric acid works well diluted in water with one 75 gram, (2.6 oz), container to about 10 litres, (10 qt), of water. Thought I would try some thing different and use the same ratio but added to the white vinegar instead.


So the next 4 shots are after 2 days just with white vinegar and then another 2 days with citric acid added as well to it for a total of 4 days.


Looks just about done already! The only thing I did was scrub the pieces with a old washing up brush once a day for a few minutes.


Will give it one more day and then wash with water with some bi-carb soda to neutralise the acid. Followed with a fresh water rinse, dried with an air gun and then coated in some lanolin to stop it flash rusting. Could use WD40 or fish oil which is the main ingredient, etc too.


The hinges were very stiff to move before and now move freely. Haven't been able to get out the screws yet so might need some heat.
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post #100 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:29 PM Thread Starter
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Not much to show this week as been stripping down the 48 cab. Was so much harder as had extra welds where the 58 didn't and far more spot welds too. Don't know if it had some thing to do with the change of ownership when Willys Overland merged with Kaiser-Frazer Corporation which then traded as Willys Motors in 1953?

]
Can see this cab has extensive rust in the lower quarter panels on both sides. Fortunately the upper half was much better. Even the 58 cab is rusted here but not as badly so will repair those.


I have been looking at where I will add extra width to the grille and bonnet. This example they have added 5" each side extra between the headlights and the grille. Makes the grille look a bit too tall and skinny in my eyes.


The other thing is if done this way as the grille stays stock width and will cover about 5" of the radiator core from the donor I will be using.


On this one they have added 10" only to the grille area which changes the grille slots from 8 to 12. I think it looks too wide now and is more than the radiator needs as well so a lot of airflow passes by the sides.


So I am thinking of going some where between the two examples. Adding 2" next to the grille and only 2 extra slots in the grille to make 10, which is actually the same number the 48 cab had stock, just narrower ones. The photochop I show has the 10 slots now but have not added the extra 2" each side next to the grille in it. I will also be adding a total of just under 9" to mine rather than 10".
The only problem this gives is that it is a lot harder to add the extra to the bonnet/hood which must be added in the same spot. So rather than just one weld seam each side, will have to add 2 for a total of 4 full length welds running down the bonnet. That is a lot of heat to control to stop the whole lot buckling.
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post #101 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:32 PM Thread Starter
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The long floor braces that run under the door sill did not fit in my container. So I poured the vinegar into some pvc sewer pipe instead. Also have the front cross member in there getting treated. Left the lid loose to release any gases.


The vinegar has done a good job on the floor braces. Pretty happy with the results.


To get the hinge pocket back straight I just used some heavy walled steel to hit against.


The torn hinge pocket looking much improved. Will weld up the tears in the corners later on when it is in the workshop.


Just showing the worse part of the crease caused by the door swinging too far open and doing this damage along the edge of the pillar inside. It runs all the way up the cowl side.


To work the crease out from the door swinging out too far, just used this spoon dolly and just swung it back and forth slowing working it out. Kept my other hand on the outside in the crease so I could feel exactly where it was.


This is the dolly I used to work out the crease. Often used to repair the rain gutters etc.


Coming up pretty well and at this stage had not used a hammer at all or even touched this side of the panel to get rid of the crease.


Looking a lot better and used the slapper and another spoon dolly between the inner skin and the pillar. This will do for now until I strip the paint later and do final work on it.


These are all the tools I used to repair the hinge pockets and the long crease that ran right up the side of the cowl.


Can see a little more work to do near the top which I will do later once the paint is stripped and have the top cut off as well for better access.


This photo shows just how much of a wedge shape the cabs have both in the flat plain and vertically. They are sitting level and square to each other. What is going to make extending the cab hard is that the sills are also curved, and not a consistent curve at that! It has more curve towards the front than at the back.
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post #102 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:35 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry but not much to add this week as has not been photo worthy. Just making a template of the top of the Willys firewall, then extending it the extra I am widening the cab.


This is a photo I found of a stock non chopped Willys with the same small rear window my 48 has.


Decision time. I have altered the photo to the approximate width the cab will end up, nearly 9" wider. I also took 2" out of the wall below the window and 1" above the gutter like I plan to do. In this photo I left the rear window the stock size and added a 4.5" strip each side of it to make up the extra width. This would require me to add 4 vertical welds from the belt line up to the gutter.


On this one I have simply added a single 9" strip in the middle of the window so would only require two welds and much shorter ones as that as only above and below the window from the belt line up. Below the belt line I will use panels from both cabs to make up the width.
Now my wife prefers one look and I prefer the other. To me the smaller window makes it look more like a 40's truck that I prefer and the larger more like a 50's one.
What do others think?
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post #103 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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Not sure if I should be posting the following as not that interesting, but guess it does show work that gets done and never seen later on?
Been looking for thing to do while my back heals, so little jobs that don't require lifting much it is. Least now I can even pick up a tool if I drop it on the floor, which was a real struggle a few weeks ago. Doing great now though.


Made a template of the top of the Willys firewall and then widened it 9" to suit the new width it will end up. Going to use the very top of the Willys firewall and attach it to the seam the template it sitting on. So everything above the template needs to be removed.


I need to leave the the upper part of the donor firewall in place as the A/C unit draws the fresh air from this compartment. Will need to completely reshape the upper piece to fit under the Willys curved cowling.


I have folded the flange down at each end that used to be up. This is so I can attach ducting to it so air can be drawn in from the side of the cowling where I will weld in some louvres.


Top of firewall reshaped. This will be hidden behind the top part of the Willys firewall.


Now need to flatten out the top piece. This will act as a support between the top of this firewall and the bottom of the channel piece below it.


I started by softening the crease by hammering a T dolly, that I made 20 years ago, along it. I use this too if I over fold something a bit as well. Followed it up with a blocking hammer over the stump.


Starting to get the profile I am after now. Will have to work it some more to bring it back in line yet. This will never be seen as under the Willys cowl and using it more as an exercise in seeing what I could achieve. Would love to have an English wheel as would make this job much easier.
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post #104 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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Back into the Willys again after getting everything back into order after being away.


While marking out the cabs I also had to take into account the width of the top part compared to the bottom one once the 2" sectioned was cut out. The taper at the A pillar showed I had to add 3 mm, 1/8", each side. The fill in piece for the top part will be made 226 mm, 9", and the bottom 220 mm.


The B pillar has even more taper as the section to be cut out was a bit higher where it tapers more around the window height. An extra 6mm, or 1/4" extra each side will be added.


The back wall will mostly come from the 48 cab. It was cut as wide as possible on the lower section to just where the recessed part starts to curve. I will use the corners on the lower part from the 58 and they will be cut further along to make up the extra width that I am after. It will be more than the 220 mm that I am widening the cab because I am also making the cab longer. Due to the trapezoid shape, when viewed from above, means any extra length also makes the rear wall wider. An extra 35 mm, or nearly 1.5" wider.
The upper part of the rear wall will be used completely as is in much better condition than the 58. It will be cut in half and a new piece made for the middle making the window wider.


So after much checking of all the cut lines, it is out with the 9" grinder with a cut off wheel to cut through the pillars.


The switched to the jigsaw to cut the rest around the cab walls.


The reciprocating saw was great for cutting through the header panel as you could keep the cut straight by cutting both sides at once.


Well the top is off!


Wont be using the parts in the foreground from this cab, only the ones in the background. They will still be useful for cutting out some patch panels where this one is not damaged in the same places.


So the 48 will give up the rear wall, all 4 corners of the top section and the lower middle part of the cowl which have all been been cut 9" wider.


Time to cut up the 58 now. Decided to use the reciprocating saw to cut through all 4 pillars first. Just got to keep an eye out of both ends of the blade to keep it level.


The jigsaw with a fine metal cutting blade was use for the cowl and rear wall.


Cutting out a section of the upper frame above the window to make the rear wall of the 48 cab wider overall.


This piece cut out had a lot to take into account. Not only the extra over all cabin width of 220 mm, but also the 35 mm extra due the the taper of the cab floor from making the cab longer. Then 12 mm total due to the taper in the walls after sectioning out the 50 mm, and then also another 3 mm for the thickness of the blade when I cut the rear upper wall through the middle of the window!
So 270 mm extra in the upper rear wall in the end. I don't expect anyone to follow that rambling.


Another roof chopped off.


Cutting the corners to size.


The parts used out of the 58. 2 cowl sides and rear corners plus the upper and lower sections of the front window and above the rear window as well, though not shown.
I wished I could have done it differently, but the lower part of the 58 was in better condition than the 48 and vice a versa. So used as much as possible of the best parts from both cabs and will fabricate parts that were just too far gone in both.
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post #105 of 638 Old 08-01-2017, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
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Time to setup the workshop for the body building phase. So the chassis was rolled out of the workshop and on to the side street and towed up around the corner to the front of the house.


Neighbours came around quickly to give me a hand to get it into the garage. Nice to have help like that.




New resting place for the next few years while I start building the body.


Hard to believe that a cab will be made from these parts.


Donor floor and firewall will be tack welded to the heavy trestles I made to keep it level and square.


Decided to try something different to remove what was left of the old floor from the bottom of the rear wall. Rather than drilling out all the spot welds, going to carefully grind them away from the other side. Noticed how the spot welds are dented in from shrinking from the welding heat. Don't want to be left with that if I can.


The spot welds were punched down from the inside to make them flat on the outside before cutting them away.


Used a 1 mm cut off disc in the grinder to cut around the spot weld.


Material cut away from around the spot weld.


Then ground away. Doing it this way creates far less heat them just attacking it with a grinding disc for the whole thing.


All of them done. Still takes some time but you would have had to grind down if drilled out and then welded up too. This way much less heat and distortion and no risk of blowing though.


The spot weld dents are much less after punching them first. The lip was also dressed flat that was on the bottom of the wall as will be cut to suit the new floor profile.
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