Fuel tank build - Page 2 - JeepForum.com
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post #16 of 26 Old 05-19-2021, 11:41 AM Thread Starter
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Well I did some measuring and weighing today. Old tank with as much gas as I could realistically get out is 50lbs including the mounting supports, filler neck, and vent lines that I removed. The stock steel tank and skid plate was around 38lbs and the rest was about 9-12lbs (gets tough to weigh all the little stuff). The new tank and all mounting hardware is about 24lbs. I currently don't have the rollover vent plumbed to anything which needs to be fixed though.

As for ground clearance, I gained about 3" of ground clearance over the stock tank.



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post #17 of 26 Old 05-19-2021, 12:09 PM
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That’s a good bit of clearance gain. How much space do you have if you ever want to move your axle back?
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post #18 of 26 Old 05-19-2021, 05:49 PM Thread Starter
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That’s a good bit of clearance gain. How much space do you have if you ever want to move your axle back?
Probably 4-5" before the axle hits the tank which is roughly 6-7" aft of the stock location. However, it's not that simple for me and believe me I've looked into this multiple times. The two easy problems... the links could get maybe an inch before I need to replace them with longer tubes and the rear driveshaft needs quite a bit more length as well as it's already pushing the limits. I probably need a longer driveshaft right now but I've been putting it off.

That's where the easy stuff ends. The coilovers are maybe 1/4"-1/2" off the shock tower so I'd have to redo the shock towers and redo the frame since the towers are frenched into the frame. I feel back halfing the Jeep at that point is the solution. Then I'd have to move and redo the air bumps because they'd be too high mounted to the new frame section. I'd also need to figure out a different rear fender solution. I could run fenderless in the rear but that's not my favorite look. On the plus side, the 4 link numbers still work out fine if I push everything back 3-5".

All in, I think I'd be in it for around $700+ just to gain a few inches and at this time, I'm not sure that's worth the expense.


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post #19 of 26 Old 05-26-2021, 03:19 PM
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Fun fact...look at the haze on the welding helmet after doing those welds. Although I tried not to breath this stuff in or even position myself directly over the welds, I probably need to take better precautions.
Yea you gotta be careful with spoolgun welding aluminum. Those gases are terrible. I remember my last job i had to use the spoolgun on a project (i normally TIG everything) and within 10 minutes of breathing in those fumes, i felt sick to my stomach for the rest of the day. no fun.

tank looks amazing btw, really makes me wanna hurry up and design one of my own!

Been MIA from here for a while... I'm trying to be active in this community again.
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post #20 of 26 Old 05-26-2021, 04:55 PM
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Yea you gotta be careful with spoolgun welding aluminum. Those gases are terrible. I remember my last job i had to use the spoolgun on a project (i normally TIG everything) and within 10 minutes of breathing in those fumes, i felt sick to my stomach for the rest of the day. no fun.

tank looks amazing btw, really makes me wanna hurry up and design one of my own!
What is the difference in the gasses produced between a spool gun and TIG? I thought they both are argon and aluminum filler.

If you cannot fix it with a hammer then it has to be an electrical problem.
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post #21 of 26 Old 05-26-2021, 07:39 PM Thread Starter
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What is the difference in the gasses produced between a spool gun and TIG? I thought they both are argon and aluminum filler.
I'm curious to know more details if we have any welding experts but I found some info. I knew TIG even on steel doesn't produce anywhere near the fumes of MIG but didn't know why...other than TIG is just a cleaner process. I did find this though since you peaked my curiosity...

MIG transfers metal across the arc. In doing this, a good bit of material evaporates and forms the visible fume. In TIG the filler wire doesn’t get as hot, so much less material evaporates and creates fume. To further explain the excessive fumes when welding aluminum, I suspect it's because of the amount of filler being transferred. With steel you're usually running wire speed around 40-50% compared to aluminum of the same thickness. For example...my Eastwood 175 welder uses 90% power and about 45% out of the max wire speed on 3/16" steel. On 3/16" aluminum with the same wire diameter, I'm running 100% power and 100% wire speed.


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post #22 of 26 Old 05-26-2021, 08:13 PM
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I'm curious to know more details if we have any welding experts but I found some info. I knew TIG even on steel doesn't produce anywhere near the fumes of MIG but didn't know why...other than TIG is just a cleaner process. I did find this though since you peaked my curiosity...

MIG transfers metal across the arc. In doing this, a good bit of material evaporates and forms the visible fume. In TIG the filler wire doesn’t get as hot, so much less material evaporates and creates fume. To further explain the excessive fumes when welding aluminum, I suspect it's because of the amount of filler being transferred. With steel you're usually running wire speed around 40-50% compared to aluminum of the same thickness. For example...my Eastwood 175 welder uses 90% power and about 45% out of the max wire speed on 3/16" steel. On 3/16" aluminum with the same wire diameter, I'm running 100% power and 100% wire speed.
Ok. That is a start and a damn good one on explaining it. I have tig welded but never welded with a spool gun.

A step further, TIG or gas welding like on an outside corner really dont need a filler rod or very little if you have the right settings. MIG uses filler to do its work and strike its arc. Very interesting topic. Something I would really like to know more about. I have worked in a shop all my life, bad things and gasses in the air take their toll. I truly try to be informed. Welding can produce some really noxious stuff.

This is something I never heard of but it makes sense and validation of it is of important to me.

I try to be very aware if fumes and dust when welding, soldering, woodworking, most things now days.

If you cannot fix it with a hammer then it has to be an electrical problem.
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post #23 of 26 Old 05-26-2021, 08:29 PM Thread Starter
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Just for the sake of argument... spoolgun or not, it's the same thing as running wire through your standard MIG gun. The only difference is you're holding a bigger gun and the wire has less chance of bird nesting in your machine. I was having issues with my spoolgun not working initially (it ended up being a loose wire in the machine) and ran 2 spools of aluminum wire through my normal gun. Worked fine but if you screw up, you're pulling 15 feet of wire through... I found a nice trick where you lower the wire feed tension so if the wire binds anywhere, the feed wheel just slips rather than creating a big mess.

As for outside corners... I can do a decent outside corner MIG weld with steel but with aluminum MIG, better get out that grinder! I've learned to do a decent fillet weld with aluminum but outside corners and butt joints all look horrible!


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post #24 of 26 Old 05-31-2021, 10:45 AM
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Just for the sake of argument... spoolgun or not, it's the same thing as running wire through your standard MIG gun. The only difference is you're holding a bigger gun and the wire has less chance of bird nesting in your machine. I was having issues with my spoolgun not working initially (it ended up being a loose wire in the machine) and ran 2 spools of aluminum wire through my normal gun. Worked fine but if you screw up, you're pulling 15 feet of wire through... I found a nice trick where you lower the wire feed tension so if the wire binds anywhere, the feed wheel just slips rather than creating a big mess
I've heard a few success stories from people who didn't want to run a spool gun for ally. apparently a really good trick is to change the torch liner out for a teflon one (i think teflon? either way, a more slippery surface than the factory liner). I couldn't tell you from my own experience though. I just don't like MIG. I actually just sold my multi process machine for a dedicated TIG. I figure if I ever need to weld something quick and easy, I still have my flux-core machine.

oh, and as far as outside corners and TIG, it all depends on the specifications you're trying to meet. using filler adds a ton of strength to the weld, but it's not always necessary if it's not a structurally critical weld. The exception being aluminum. ALWAYS use filler when TIG welding aluminum (except for maybe a tack that you're definately going to be welding over).

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post #25 of 26 Old 05-31-2021, 01:29 PM Thread Starter
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I've heard a few success stories from people who didn't want to run a spool gun for ally. apparently a really good trick is to change the torch liner out for a teflon one (i think teflon? either way, a more slippery surface than the factory liner). I couldn't tell you from my own experience though. I just don't like MIG. I actually just sold my multi process machine for a dedicated TIG. I figure if I ever need to weld something quick and easy, I still have my flux-core machine.

oh, and as far as outside corners and TIG, it all depends on the specifications you're trying to meet. using filler adds a ton of strength to the weld, but it's not always necessary if it's not a structurally critical weld. The exception being aluminum. ALWAYS use filler when TIG welding aluminum (except for maybe a tack that you're definately going to be welding over).
Yeah I didn't even change the liner when I welded up my rock sliders. I just lowered the wire feed tension so the wire would slip instead of bird nesting and tried to keep the gun wire fairly straight. 5356 is a bit stiffer than 4340 as well so that can help but even 4340 isn't terrible.

I'm still learning TIG and am not very good at it. It's a lot easier when everything is on a welding table in front of you and you're sitting down but in the real world of TIG welding something on a vehicle or when you don't have a table to work on, MIG is just so much easier to get right. I've also learned that I can make a nice looking TIG weld that is structurally garbage. Usually if my MIG welds look good, they are good at least.


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post #26 of 26 Old 05-31-2021, 07:15 PM
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I think that any kind of welding brought to a vehicle vs the tabletop or similar position we learn on creates challenges. Uphill vs downhill, horizontal, etc. I currently weld a decent amount of exhaust stuff on the vehicle which creates all sorts of vision, hand position, slag dropping on you, torch angle not being optimum which makes gas pressure changes imperative at times, etc. The position on many vehicle parts though is ever changing and you really have to be keen to a lot of stuff to make it look professional and be worthy structurally.
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If you cannot fix it with a hammer then it has to be an electrical problem.
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