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Unread 02-24-2012, 07:11 AM   #16
Gramps
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2007 MK Compass 
 
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It is a matter of 'driver control'. Letting it free wheel going down hill is letting the weight of the vehicle control the speed. Also are you going to need more brake jobs because you didn't let the engine do the braking?

I don't try to hyper-mile anymore but I used too and never saw enough difference to have to work at it that hard but to each their own.

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MK Skid Plate fasteners for sale posts 68 & 69

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Unread 02-24-2012, 06:05 PM   #17
WingedScapula
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gramps View Post
It is a matter of 'driver control'. Letting it free wheel going down hill is letting the weight of the vehicle control the speed. Also are you going to need more brake jobs because you didn't let the engine do the braking?
True, there is less control while in neutral, but if your hand is resting on the shift lever and you can pop it into Drive in just a moment, is anything truly lost? It's true that braking in neutral is probably tougher on the brakes, but these are scenarios where I wouldn't be braking, anyway - long coasts and long down-hills, with no traffic light or stop sign anywhere nearby.

As I mentioned previously, my primary concern is with engine wear-and-tear. It's false economy to save a bit on gas if I burn the engine out and have to pay more than I saved on gas to get it fixed or replaced.
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Unread 02-24-2012, 07:31 PM   #18
Gramps
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With this kind of stuff there are always trade offs that you have to judge on a personal level. I'm not saying that anyone is right or wrong, if it works for you then it's a good thing.
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MK Skid Plate fasteners for sale posts 68 & 69

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Unread 02-29-2012, 03:30 PM   #19
Nafpu
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Not to mention that constantly going in and out of drive/neutral is probably pretty hard on your transmission...
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Unread 03-07-2012, 08:17 PM   #20
Afmcronnie
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If you "blip" the throttle when deaccelerating it will unlock the torque converter, this greatly reduces the drag. I use this technique when I'm going 30 mph, or less, and a slight downhill or level road and coming up to a stop. On longer downhills, or coming off the highway onto a ramp, Ill let the fuel cut-off do it's thing. It really does save fuel, AND wear on the brakes. When I had my 2009 FDI, I would use the Autostick to keep the rpm's above 1500 as I slowed, extending the fuel cut-off as long as possible. It resumes normal flow below 1500. I use the cruise control as much as possible in my FDII, and keep the rpm between 2000 and 2500 when accelerating. In my FDI I had an avg MPG of just over 24, in my FDII I have 22.4. Thats at 9600 miles of 70/30 hwy/city in light to moderate hills. Not too shabby for an FDII. I agree that following a driver who is following a strict hypermiling routine is annoying, and DANGEROUS, in big city traffic. I can identify with their desire to wish to squeeze every mpg possible out of their ride, but PLEASE dont do it by putting the lives of myself and my family in jepordy. There is a time and a place for that, and lessons in driving technique that everyone can profit from, but doing it during rush hour on a crowded freeway, or in a place where it is difficult for another driver to pass safely, is IRRESPONSIBLE.
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Unread 03-23-2012, 06:53 PM   #21
WingedScapula
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Afmcronnie View Post
If you "blip" the throttle when deaccelerating it will unlock the torque converter, this greatly reduces the drag. I use this technique when I'm going 30 mph, or less, and a slight downhill or level road and coming up to a stop. On longer downhills, or coming off the highway onto a ramp, Ill let the fuel cut-off do it's thing. It really does save fuel, AND wear on the brakes. When I had my 2009 FDI, I would use the Autostick to keep the rpm's above 1500 as I slowed, extending the fuel cut-off as long as possible. It resumes normal flow below 1500.
Thanks for this advice, I'll consider implementing it. Now that the weather has become unseasonably warm (we're already hitting upper 70˚F's and lower 80's) it seems like it's coasting a bit easier, even in drive. The CVT also seems to behave a bit better - whereas accelerating along a patch of highway near my driveway would cause the engine to rev to the mid- and upper-2000's when the weather was around 40˚F or below, now it stays around 2000 even with the same acceleration. In both cases the engine is still "cold." The CVT seems to function much more nicely in warm weather (not that it's bad in cold weather, but the difference is surprising).
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