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Unread 05-20-2011, 04:48 PM   #1
Brad454
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esp-bas light on after Cruise Control Install

Hi newbie here.
Just got finished installing the cruise control switch and harness on my friends 2007 Compass. The cruise works great, but now the esp-bas light is staying on. I was wondering if it was because the battery had been disconnected or did I not plug something in?
Any help would be much appreciated.
Thanks Brad

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Unread 05-20-2011, 05:47 PM   #2
Gramps
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The first thing I would wonder about is if the clockspring was installed correctly. That will effect the steering angle sensor which can throw the the ESP-BAS light on. That same thing can show up when the tie rod or lower ball joints are going.

First do this - go crank the steering wheel all the way left, then all the way right to see if it re-centers and give us some feedback.
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Unread 05-20-2011, 07:31 PM   #3
Brad454
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Please excuse my unfamiliarity. What is the clock spring? Would the steering wheel not being centered cause this? I noticed after replacing the wheel, that it is perhaps 2 teeth off. I will do the steering wheel turn test and post back in a minute.

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Unread 05-20-2011, 07:42 PM   #4
Brad454
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OK just checked it out and the wheel doesn't return to center on it's own. The Compass has less then 40,000 miles on it. I wouldn't think the tie rods or lower ball joints would be going out yet.
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Unread 05-20-2011, 07:47 PM   #5
Brad454
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Ok I just did a search and discovered what the clock spring is. What position should it be in with relationship to the wheel? It moved when I did the install.
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Unread 05-20-2011, 09:14 PM   #6
Gramps
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I'm not sure if the FSM actually gives a position other than relative to how it came out. I'll check more in the morning. There have been several who have done this proceedure, maybe they will give some first hand info.
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Unread 05-21-2011, 07:11 AM   #7
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More than you wanted to know...

CLOCKSPRING - Description:

The clockspring (3) for this vehicle is secured near the top of the steering column below the steering wheel. The clockspring also includes an integral, internal turn signal cancel cam and a Steering Angle Sensor (SAS) that are both serviced as a unit with the clockspring. The clockspring also supports the left (lighting) multi-function switch (1), the Steering Control Module (SCM) internal to the left multi-function switch housing (2), and the right (wiper) multi-function switch (6). Each of these switches and the jumper wire harness (5) between the two multi-function switches can be separated from and are serviced individually from the clockspring.
The clockspring case includes integral tabs for mounting the unit with three screws to the steering column lock housing as well as integral provisions for mounting and supporting both multi-function switches. The multi-function switches are each secured to the clockspring with a single screw (7). The SAS within the clockspring includes an electronic circuit board and a microprocessor, which allows it to communicate with other electronic modules in the vehicle over the Controller Area Network (CAN) data bus. The SAS circuitry, the clockspring, and the turn signal cancel cam are all contained within a flat, molded plastic case.

The clockspring case includes three connector receptacles that face toward the instrument panel. Within the plastic case is a spool-like molded plastic rotor with a large exposed hub. The upper surface of the rotor hub has a large center hole, two short pigtail wires with connectors, and a connector receptacle that faces toward the steering wheel. The lower surface of the rotor has an integral dowel that also faces toward the steering wheel. Wound around the rotor spool within the case is a long ribbon-like tape that consists of several thin copper wire leads sandwiched between two thin plastic membranes. The outer end of the tape terminates at two of the connector receptacles that face the instrument panel, while the inner end of the tape terminates at the pigtail wires and connector receptacle on the hub of the clockspring rotor that face the steering wheel. The outer surface of the rotor hub rim within the clockspring case also has the integral lobes of the turn signal cancel cam.

The service replacement clockspring is shipped pre-centered and with a molded plastic locking pin (4) installed. The locking pin secures the centered clockspring rotor to the clockspring case during shipment and handling, but must be removed after the clockspring is installed on the steering column and the steering wheel is installed.

The clockspring cannot be repaired. If the clockspring is ineffective, damaged, or if the driver airbag has been deployed, the clockspring/turn signal cancel cam/SAS unit must be replaced.

OPERATION:

The clockspring is a mechanical electrical circuit component that is used to provide continuous electrical continuity between the fixed instrument panel wire harness and certain electrical components mounted on or in the rotating steering wheel. On this vehicle the rotating electrical components include the driver airbag, the horn switch, the speed control switch, and the remote radio switches, if the vehicle is so equipped. The clockspring is positioned and secured near the top of the steering column. The fixed connector receptacles on the back of the fixed clockspring case connect the clockspring to the vehicle electrical system through three take outs with connectors from the instrument panel wire harness.

The turn signal cancel cam is integral to the rim of the clockspring rotor hub within the clockspring case so it also moves with the rotation of the steering wheel. Two short, black-sleeved pigtail wires on the upper surface of the clockspring rotor connect the clockspring to the driver airbag, while a steering wheel wire harness connected to the connector receptacle on the upper surface of the clockspring rotor complete circuits to the horn switch, the speed control switch and, if the vehicle is so equipped, to the optional remote radio switches on the steering wheel. The third connector receptacle is dedicated to the inputs and outputs of the Steering Angle Sensor (SAS) internal to the clockspring case.

Like the clockspring in a timepiece, the clockspring tape has travel limits and can be damaged by being wound too tightly during full stop-to-stop steering wheel rotation. To prevent this from occurring, the clockspring is centered when it is installed on the steering column. Centering the clockspring indexes the clockspring tape to the movable steering components so that the tape can operate within its designed travel limits. However, if the steering wheel is removed from the steering column, if the clockspring is removed from the steering column, or if the steering shaft is disconnected from the steering gear, the clockspring spool can change position relative to the other steering components. The clockspring must be re-centered following completion of this service or the tape may be damaged.

Service replacement clocksprings are shipped pre-centered and with a plastic locking pin installed. This locking pin should not be removed until the steering wheel has been installed on the steering column. If the locking pin is removed before the steering wheel is installed on a steering column, the clockspring centering procedure must be performed.

Proper clockspring installation may be confirmed by viewing the SAS data using a diagnostic scan tool.

The hard wired clockspring circuits as well as the hard wired inputs and outputs of the SAS may be diagnosed using conventional diagnostic tools and procedures. Refer to the appropriate wiring information. However, conventional diagnostic methods will not prove conclusive in the diagnosis of the SAS or the electronic controls or communication between other modules and devices that provide features of the Electronic Stability Program (ESP) or Supplemental Restraint System (SRS). The most reliable, efficient, and accurate means to diagnose the SAS or the electronic controls and communication related to ESP or SRS operation requires the use of a diagnostic scan tool. Refer to the appropriate diagnostic information.

CLOCKSPRING CENTERING:

WARNING: To avoid serious or fatal injury on vehicles equipped with airbags, disable the supplemental restraint system before attempting any steering wheel, steering column, airbag, occupant classification system, seat belt tensioner, impact sensor, or instrument panel component diagnosis or service. Disconnect and isolate the battery negative (ground) cable, then wait two minutes for the system capacitor to discharge before performing further diagnosis or service. This is the only sure way to disable the supplemental restraint system. Failure to take the proper precautions could result in accidental airbag deployment.

NOTE: A service replacement clockspring is shipped with the clockspring pre-centered and with a molded plastic locking pin installed. This locking pin should not be removed until the steering wheel has been installed on the steering column. If the locking pin is removed before the steering wheel is installed, the clockspring centering procedure must be performed.

NOTE: When a clockspring is installed into a vehicle without properly centering and locking the entire steering system, the Steering Angle Sensor (SAS) data does not agree with the true position of the steering system and causes the ESP system to shut down. This may also damage the clockspring without any immediate malfunction. Unlike some other DaimlerChrysler vehicles, this SAS never requires calibration.

NOTE: Determining if the clockspring/SAS is centered is also possible electrically using the diagnostic scan tool. Steering wheel position is displayed as ANGLE with a range of up to 900 degrees. Refer to the appropriate menu item on the diagnostic scan tool.

NOTE: Before starting this procedure, be certain to turn the steering wheel until the front wheels are in the straight-ahead position and that the entire steering system is locked or inhibited from rotation.

NOTE: The clockspring may be centered and the rotor may be rotated freely once the steering wheel has been removed.

1. Place the front wheels in the straight-ahead position and inhibit the steering column shaft from rotation.
2. Remove the steering wheel from the steering shaft.
3. Rotate the clockspring rotor (1) clockwise to the end of its travel. Do not apply excessive torque.
4. From the end of the clockwise travel, rotate the rotor about two and one-half turns counterclockwise. Turn the rotor slightly clockwise or counterclockwise as necessary so that the clockspring airbag pigtail wires (3) and connector receptacle are at the top and the dowel pin (5) is at the bottom.
5. The clockspring is now centered. Secure the clockspring rotor to the clockspring case using a locking pin (2) or some similar device to maintain clockspring centering until the steering wheel is reinstalled on the steering column.
clockspring.jpg   centering.jpg  
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Unread 05-21-2011, 07:15 AM   #8
Gramps
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Just FYI: Early life failure on the Lower Ball Joints and Tie Rod Ends is maybe the biggest complaint about the MK's, some as early as 30K miles. However, I don't think that those problems would suddenly show up by installing the Cruise Control, I'm betting on the clockspring and steering wheel position.
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Unread 05-21-2011, 02:38 PM   #9
Brad454
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Thanks
I did the centering procedure and it worked perfectly. I didn't notice it when I installed the CC, but the wheel and the steering shaft have alignment dots. Also the wheel has one larger tooth. Evidently the wheel being off just a hair, caused the problem. The plastic pin on the clock spring was still in it's steering wheel hole, but that wasn't enough.
Thanks again for your time. Now my friends compass is all set up for him to drive long distances.
Best Regards
Brad
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Unread 05-21-2011, 02:43 PM   #10
Gramps
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Thanks for the feedback! I love success.
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MK Skid Plate fasteners for sale posts 68 & 69

Also visit me at Photobucket
'06 WK Grand Cherokee Limited Quadra-Drive II, 5.7
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