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Unread 10-11-2012, 04:19 PM   #31
rirrgang
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Try Permatex 80646 Gasket Remover.
Our Powder Coater uses it.

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Unread 10-11-2012, 04:36 PM   #32
J33PNSL33P
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It's already all cleaned off. Thanks for all the responses!
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Unread 10-11-2012, 06:25 PM   #33
J33PNSL33P
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Here's the pic you asked for.
image-3487237234.jpg  
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Unread 10-11-2012, 07:23 PM   #34
gwar11d2
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Looks great! I'm kinda digging JCR... Driving up to MI for the holidays... I might have to buy one from them locally. Still torn on ARB though... ( I need a large Deer Slayer Bumper)
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Unread 10-11-2012, 07:45 PM   #35
CooterTKE
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Looks good
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Unread 10-11-2012, 11:37 PM   #36
1222
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Glad you got it all taken care of and the bumper is installed. Just out of curiosity how long did it take to fix all the threads?
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Unread 10-12-2012, 07:34 AM   #37
J33PNSL33P
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Three hours to clean off 16 bolts. Most of that time was spent on the first couple, once I got a system down I ripped through them.
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Unread 10-12-2012, 09:04 AM   #38
jwmbishop
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I dont get it. With a die you thread blank rod at 25 per hour...
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Unread 10-12-2012, 09:45 AM   #39
J33PNSL33P
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The die wasn't a ton of help. There wasn't enough room inside the bumper to spin it without the ends of the handle hitting something. Plus I had to sand and wire wheel the ends before I could even start a die.
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Unread 10-12-2012, 12:58 PM   #40
jwmbishop
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Oh - damn, neglected to share the tool tip with you - you don't need to use the handle for chasing. Use a 1 inch 12pt socket. If you have a knurled socket - or a Finger Driver even better. The only time you need the t-handle is when no threads exist and you MUST go straight on to a rod - the t-handle applies force more equally. As long as there are base threads the die will find em! (and the more taper you have in the die the easier it will find em, although also the more taper the eassier to force into a cross thread) - and once you have caught one thread you can just GO with a wratchet! That die is sharper than the sand paper you used to pre dress - let THAT do the work!

Just start die by hand (it may want to cross thread - but once it is in enough to choose - it will choose the soft coating material over the metal and drop into alignment - when running it on by hand you can feel that happen!) - using your fingers you will not damage the threads (well most of us - I know a guy who broke 1/4-20 carburetor studs finger tightening em...). Once the die and existing threads are aligned it will go easy... turn 1/4 turn in, back up 1/8th turn to clear cut - repeat until threads align and it turns free! Can also use a 1 inch wrench - but only after hand starting. No need to dress the ends before you start - unless the end is severely mushroomed, the coating is soft enough to cut away with the die. I have repaired MANY studs that were slightly mushroomed from impact on the end. Rarely even need more than a finger driver.

Same applies for taps when chasing the female threads. I use an 8pt 1/4x1/4 or 5/16x1/4 socket and speed wrench (or chuck it into a variable speed drill - be careful then as any side ways force will break the tap off and being hardened it is rather nasty to extract). A 12 pt will work - but the contact area is rather tiny and can break the square on the tang (especially if you let it bottom out).
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Unread 10-12-2012, 01:39 PM   #41
J33PNSL33P
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Thanks for the info! Even tho its a little late for this project I'm sure it won't be the last time I need to break out the tap and die set
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Unread 10-12-2012, 04:24 PM   #42
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Yep. You will use it now that you have it.

I chase threads on all used fasteners (and at least visually inspect new ones) whenever I am setting up parts for assembly (and I always lay all my parts out in order of assembly before I start putting anything together). I learned the hard way. FAR easier to spin the die down and back than find out later the threads are bunged up. That bolt is steel and if you are threading it into aluminum or cast and your eye does not see the bad thread - you WILL screw up the female threads! Bolts to nuts is not as big an issue - but if you are assembling something where you only get a 1/8 turn at a time due to lack of wrench room - who wants to spend time cranking on a stiff bolt - you should be able to spin it on by fingers until snug (nylocks and crimp caps excluded of course!) and only have to wrench the final turn (or two when using a split lock washer)! 1 minute on the die saves 3 minutes cranking in an awkward position! And the suggestion to just go over any crud as you assemble is BAD - if it takes 50 ft lbs of torque to turn the nut before its even seated - hitting 100 lbs is the equivalent of using good hardware and only torquing to 50 (and this likely contributes to the number of folks who find things like their track bar bolts loose later)

I recently pulled the engine/trans from my 57 (inspect prior to and dyno after injection\ignition upgrade). While out I decided to re-detail the body and chassis and go over the rear end, frame bolts, body and front suspension modifications (this was all done by the customizer who clipped it 25 years ago - I bought it and swapped my engine and trans in as is). I was shocked at how many were loose or had to be cut off as they seized running off over the crud they were ran on over etc. No WONDER it rattled like a 50 year old truck!

Imagine you are down to assembling the intake manifold on a small block chevy crate assembly and find the one beside the carb only goes in about 1/3 of the length. BIG deal now as you may not be able to chase it with the manifold in place so you just lost the end seal, the assembly time and are now making chips over an open crankcase! Would have been better to spend the 5 minutes to chase all threaded holes and studs before final wash! I would like to say it only took once - but being the slow learner I am - it happened once or twice too often is more appropriate! Its not just time but the frustration that carries to the next process.

But even aside from that - every time you torque down a bolt it stretches. When untorqued it simply can not return to its pre torque length. After a few uses it could retain enough stretch to be severely weakened. Running a die down will show you when this has happened as you will see the threads being cut thinner! Headbolts are a prime example - on disassembly I will chuck the die in a pipe vice and run each bolt into and out of the die with a butterfly impact - if more than one third the threads are shiny when done - that bolt is stretched and goes into the steel recycle bin or trash without even becoming a load on the cleaning process and either new ones are ordered or acceptable used ones come from the bolt bucket. When I have a handful of bolts left over after a job - I will chase em before I throw em in the bolts bin. That way later if I am rushed and have to grab one to replace that one that rolled who knows where - its as ready to go as if I was stocking new stuff.
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