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-   -   would the pt cruiser turbo that air sierra used for his 2.4l fit on the 2.5l? (http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f9/would-pt-cruiser-turbo-air-sierra-used-his-2-4l-fit-2-5l-633235/)

David Hinton 11-17-2008 01:01 AM

would the pt cruiser turbo that air sierra used for his 2.4l fit on the 2.5l?
 
would the turbo from a pt cruiser or srt4 work for the 2.5l? or is there another compatable turbo for the 2.5l that is pretty cheap?
thanks

David Hinton 11-17-2008 10:32 AM

does anyone know of a turbo that would work for the 2.5l? also whats different between the 2.4l and the 2.5l ?

Unlimited04 11-17-2008 10:35 AM

no they are two completely different engines. the 2.5L is derived from the GM Iron Duke, the 2.4L is a new Chrysler engine put in TJs 2003+.

never monday 11-17-2008 10:39 AM

the size of the turbo is fine for the 2.5. It will require custom manifolds to work

ieatchickens 11-17-2008 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unlimited04 (Post 6020742)
no they are two completely different engines. the 2.5L is derived from the GM Iron Duke, the 2.4L is a new Chrysler engine put in TJs 2003+.

This is a misconception. The "Iron Duke" was never used in Jeep vehicles. There was a 2.5 liter (151 CI) GM engine used in Jeeps from 1980-83 but it wasn't the Iron Duke and has no relation to the 2.5 liter (150 CI) engine in the TJ.

The 2.5 TJ engine is an AMC design that debuted in 1984 in the CJ.

2.5 GM used from 80-83 engine link: http://jeep.off-road.com/jeep/articl....jsp?id=260198

2.5 AMC engine used from 85-03 link: http://jeep.off-road.com/jeep/articl....jsp?id=261540

David Hinton 11-17-2008 08:11 PM

how could a turbo from a pt cruiser not work for a 2.5l motor? if the 2.5l only has one cam and the 2.4l has 2, would this not allow for the pt cruiser or a ptcruiser aftermarket turbo not work? it would require some modifications but it shouldnt require too much or am i wrong?

spyder6 11-17-2008 08:21 PM

all the 2.5 is is essentially a 4.0 with 2 cyls chopped off... in so many words.

David Hinton 11-17-2008 08:25 PM

does anyone know why the 2.4l pt cruiser turbo wouldnt fit on the 2.5l? or does anyone know of a turbo that would work for the 2.5l jeep engine?

Unlimited04 11-17-2008 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Hinton (Post 6023664)
how could a turbo from a pt cruiser not work for a 2.5l motor? if the 2.5l only has one cam and the 2.4l has 2, would this not allow for the pt cruiser or a ptcruiser aftermarket turbo not work? it would require some modifications but it shouldnt require too much or am i wrong?

if you can weld, and have fabrication skills, you can definitely make a manifold that will work. the turbo is correctly sized.

thats the easy part. now the hard part is getting enough fuel and air to the mixture with correctly sized injectors, larger throttle body, custom computer programs, O2 sensor simulators, etc. It will ultimatly require dyno time to get the a/f mixture and timing right throughout the rpm range.

otherwise no, its not going to work. the manifold's bolt pattern is completely different between 2.4L and 2.5L - they're totally different engines developed at completely different times in history.

RockRodHooligan 11-17-2008 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Hinton (Post 6023755)
does anyone know why the 2.4l pt cruiser turbo wouldnt fit on the 2.5l? or does anyone know of a turbo that would work for the 2.5l jeep engine?

The turbo will fit, but every thing else in the system will not. Turbos and superchargers can be pretty universal, it's the rest of the system that is taylor made to fit the different engines/cars, intake mainifolds for superchargers(roots and screww type) and exhuast manifolds for turbos. Centrifical superchargers are the only forced induction that doesn't require a custom intake or exhaust, but like the rest, still require modification to the fuel system, comuter, and timing.

David Hinton 11-17-2008 10:48 PM

how much do you think a shop would charge me if I supply them with the pt turbo for the 2.5l?

KKiowaTJ 11-17-2008 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unlimited04 (Post 6023770)
if you can weld, and have fabrication skills, you can definitely make a manifold that will work. the turbo is correctly sized.

thats the easy part. now the hard part is getting enough fuel and air to the mixture with correctly sized injectors, larger throttle body, custom computer programs, O2 sensor simulators, etc. It will ultimatly require dyno time to get the a/f mixture and timing right throughout the rpm range.

otherwise no, its not going to work. the manifold's bolt pattern is completely different between 2.4L and 2.5L - they're totally different engines developed at completely different times in history.


Other than the first line you posted, Do you have any clue what you are even talking about? All your doing is pumping up your post count. If you run 02 Sim's, Hows the engine going to know what temp, Air to add, and fuel. The computer is fine, Might need a chip, But thats all. The only thing you have right is that you will need new manifold's, Intake and exhaust that is larger to handle a boost of a turbo. Plus an inter-cooler larger exhaust.

To the original poster, RPM machine out of Utah has some of the things you will need along with Hesco performance for odds and end's. It will work, But you have to look around and collect parts and do some research on the way you want it to perform. A turbo kicks in a certain RPM , Not through the entire range. You would be money ahead to just drop a 88-92 350 TBI with a 700r4 tranny. You will need better axles, But still money ahead if you bought the items right.

RockRodHooligan 11-17-2008 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KKiowaTJ (Post 6024866)
Other than the first line you posted, Do you have any clue what you are even talking about? All your doing is pumping up your post count. If you run 02 Sim's, Hows the engine going to know what temp, Air to add, and fuel. The computer is fine, Might need a chip, But thats all. The only thing you have right is that you will need new manifold's, Intake and exhaust that is larger to handle a boost of a turbo.

To the original poster, RPM machine out of Utah has some of the things you will need along with Hesco performance for odds and end's. It will work, But you have to look around and collect parts and do some research on the way you want it to perform. A turbo kicks in a certain RPM , Not through the entire range.

It's too late for me to even touch this, wrong on so many different points.

Dmcastino 11-17-2008 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Hinton (Post 6024788)
how much do you think a shop would charge me if I supply them with the pt turbo for the 2.5l?

Probably quite a bit more than anyone would be willing to spend considering what gains you might see.

Doctor7474 11-17-2008 11:07 PM

What people have been trying to say, which evidently you didn't catch is this.

The turbo is the correct size as in CFM air flow.

The turbo can physically be put onto your engine, someone will have to custom make you an exhaust manifold for it, that costs money probably several hundred dollars at least.

However, with out custom computer programming, fuel system (fuel injectors, fuel pumps, and fuel lines), and R&D time it will BLOW UP YOUR ENGINE. This part of the work would cost you thousands of dollars for someone to spend there time developing software, and buying and installing all the fuel system components to keep it from BLOWING UP YOUR ENGINE.

The cheapest route to get this accomplished is to:

1. Find a turbo kit with fuel system and computer programming already developed for your application. (usually 5k$+ for most turbo kits I've ever seen)

2. Buy all the parts yourself, have a exhaust manifold custom made, and invest in something like Accel digital fuel injection that can be programmed via a laptop. Unless you have extreme knowledge in digital fuel injection systems, how they operate, and how they must be programmed, I would highly suggest some other route to take, which leads back to paying someone else an outrageous amount of money to do. (Several thousand dollars for this option, and difficult to do if you don't know what you are doing)

Both of which are not exactly cheap options.

Basically what I'm getting at is if you can't write a program for your own ECM, fabricate headers, and know exactly what you need to upgrade your fuel system, your going to pay an arm and a leg to get what you want accomplished.


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