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Unread 03-14-2013, 09:09 AM   #1
theremikegoes
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odd twist on a sanden compressor install

Anyone thought of oiling a sanden by plumbing the intake of the compressor to the crankcase? Too much/too little oil...? Too dirty? Obviously an oil separator would be needed down stream of the compressor but I would do that anyway. Might just try it and see what shows up in the downstream separator.

Just spitballing... thoughts...?

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Unread 03-14-2013, 09:16 AM   #2
freeskier93
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I'm not sure putting that much vacuum on the crankcase would be a good idea. Plus very little oil comes out of the CCV anyway, probably not enough to work.
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Unread 03-14-2013, 10:45 AM   #3
theremikegoes
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Dont drag racers run vacuum pumps on the crank case to make more horsepower from decreased drag? I could see pulling 29" on the case being a bad thing, but I would leave the case vented to the airbox as well so I doubt it would see much vacuum. For the oiling, maybe its more of a question of how tight an engine is as to whether there would be enough oil... I had a smoking 305 sbc that would defintely have provided enough oil- it would blow breather filters off and then spray oil mist, haha.
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Unread 03-21-2013, 09:13 AM   #4
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Ended up tearing the compressor apart and doing the grease conversion that a lot of airbag guys talk about. The suction side is teed into the breather hose-I'll find out if there's enough to keep the top end of the compressor happy. After taking the compressor apart I can easily see why they fail even when using an inline oiler... there's a needle bearing near the clutch that has a very tortuous path for oil to reach it. Mine wasnt even getting enough oil being used as an AC compressor-it was pretty dry and had a heat signature starting.

The compressor is pretty easy to tear down... I'll have a peek inside at the end of the summer and see how this works out, from other grease conversion reports I think it will work fine.
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Unread 03-22-2013, 12:54 PM   #5
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Love to hear more about the "grease" conversion....
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Unread 03-22-2013, 01:05 PM   #6
theremikegoes
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google search grease conversion sanden... quite a few threads with lots of pics already. there's really nothing to it except for tearing it down, cleaning the existing refrigerant oil out of it, and giving everything a thorough lube with hi temp grease. It is also recommended to plug the hole going from the compression chamber to the wobble plate innards-pretty obvious when its apart. There's a guy who also drilled the casting that holds the front needle bearing and put a grease zerk on it to keep the needle bearing from pumping all its grease out-great idea but I didnt like my chances of drilling a straight hole that small of a diameter. Once you get it apart it'll make sense, I think it took me an hour or so to do the "conversion".
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Unread 03-22-2013, 01:38 PM   #7
Jerry Bransford
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That lubrication issue with the Sanden is one reason I'm such a fan of using the York F210 compressor instead. The York isn't a bolt-in install using an OE mounting bracket like the Sanden is but it sure has its advantages.
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Unread 03-22-2013, 01:53 PM   #8
theremikegoes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
That lubrication issue with the Sanden is one reason I'm such a fan of using the York F210 compressor instead. The York isn't a bolt-in install using an OE mounting bracket like the Sanden is but it sure has its advantages.
100% agree... I have a york in my CJ, only reason I'm going the sanden route on my TJ is that one came on an engine I bought-cost me nothing additional and my TJ didnt come with AC so I've got nothing to lose by trying it out.

Also, I'd be curious to know how they all fail... I'm willing to bet its the front needle bearing because no matter how much oil you put in an inline oiler there's no way it would make it all the way to that needle bearing.
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Unread 03-27-2013, 05:51 PM   #9
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All done... along with the 'extra switch panel' mod. I found a tiny air tank laying around which had mounting tabs on the same spacing as two studs on the firewall, not planning on running any air tools so its real function is to prevent rapid cycling of the compressor clutch. I think total cost was around $100. Now I'll just use it and see how long it lasts...

Excuse the filthy motor... I havent washed it yet since the last trip out.



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Unread 03-27-2013, 09:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
That lubrication issue with the Sanden is one reason I'm such a fan of using the York F210 compressor instead. The York isn't a bolt-in install using an OE mounting bracket like the Sanden is but it sure has its advantages.
What are the advantages, Jerry?
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Unread 03-27-2013, 09:54 PM   #11
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sorry, I'm not Jerry but I'll take a stab at why they're better... They are splash lubricated by oil in the crankcase of the compressor, that oil also stays put for the most part instead of blowing by the piston. The sandens actually have a port that connects the discharge side to the crank case which the york doesnt have. The york stays lubricated without any "conversions", the sanden requires an inline oiler-or possibly grease conversion-and even then is likely to burn up anyway. If you fill up a sanden like you do a york it would very quickly blow all the oil out the discharge.

In a nutshell yorks are very reliable, pump more air than a sanden(though not much depending on the model), and put very little oil in the air they compress.
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Unread 03-27-2013, 10:49 PM   #12
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Some good York info...
http://67-72chevytrucks.com/vboard/s...d.php?t=331566
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Unread 03-28-2013, 02:24 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theremikegoes View Post
sorry, I'm not Jerry but I'll take a stab at why they're better... They are splash lubricated by oil in the crankcase of the compressor, that oil also stays put for the most part instead of blowing by the piston. The sandens actually have a port that connects the discharge side to the crank case which the york doesnt have. The york stays lubricated without any "conversions", the sanden requires an inline oiler-or possibly grease conversion-and even then is likely to burn up anyway. If you fill up a sanden like you do a york it would very quickly blow all the oil out the discharge.

In a nutshell yorks are very reliable, pump more air than a sanden(though not much depending on the model), and put very little oil in the air they compress.
Nicely said & absolutely dead-on!
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