Automatic transmission fluid change - JeepForum.com
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post #1 of 29 Old 10-12-2015, 09:53 PM Thread Starter
mgaither0
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Automatic transmission fluid change

I just noticed today that my transmission fluid looks like a dark redish brown. Looks horrible. Worst I've ever seen. I've read a lot of different info, but was looking for how to change my fluid and filter on a automatic and how to get all the fluid out. I don't to leave a lot of dirty fluid in there. Let me know if u have a write up or can give some info. I've a lot been having a real hard time going over 20 mph up hill and about 35 in general. Shifts ruff and idles high before it finally shifts. Figure this is probably due to the dirty fluid. Thanks

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post #2 of 29 Old 10-12-2015, 11:51 PM
Jerry Bransford
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I or someone else may clarify or add more to this later but basically it goes like this... drop the transmission pan and replace the filter. That will get rid of the first 4 or so quarts of the old ATF. After the pan and new filter are back in place, add enough fresh ATF+4 back to the transmission via a small funnel placed in the transmission dipstick tube to equal what was in the pan, about 4 quarts.

Next, disconnect the transmission coolant line from the passenger side port located at the bottom of the radiator. Note it's the driver's side on 2003 and newer. The ATF exits the passenger side of the cooler where it then returns to the transmission. So once the passenger side hose has been disconnected, connect a short hose to the now open port on the bottom of the radiator and place the other end of that hose into a large bucket or basin that can hold 3-5 gallons.

With the funnel still in the dipstick tube, start the engine. Once you have verified the hose won't flip out of the bucket, shift the transmission into Neutral which starts the ATF pump. The old dirty ATF will start flowing into the bucket, and you add fresh ATF+4 back into the transmission from the top via the funnel in the dipstick tube at the same rate the old ATF is flowing out into the bucket. Once you have around 8 empty ATF+4 bottles, the ATF now flowing into the bucket should be a nice clear clean red color. Shift back into Park, reconnect the hose back to the radiator and start the engine again. Check the ATF level with the transmission in Neutral and top it off to the full mark on the dipstick. You're done.

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post #3 of 29 Old 10-13-2015, 06:47 AM
JBTJ
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Here is how I do mine.


How to completely replace the ATF in your 32RH transmission. First it helps to have a buddy help you with this. You will also need a length of 3/8th's rubber hose and an empty milk jug marked off in 1 quart increments. First start off by disconnecting the transmission cooler line at the radiator on the driver's side. Connect one end of the 3/8th's rubber hose to the metal line and secure with a hose clamp, then stick the other end into the milk jug. Now have your buddy start the engine and place into neutral. This will begin to pump ATF into the milk jug and allow to fill up to the 3 quart mark, once it does place back into park and turn off the motor. By doing this you will be empting most of the ATF from the pan so when you go to drop the pan ATF will not spill out every where creating a mess. Now go ahead and remove the pan and replace the filter. Then clean the pan thoroughly and reinstall the pan. Next is to top off with 3 quarts of ATF+4 by pouring it down the dip stick tube. At this point your are ready to replace the ATF in the torque converter. Now have your buddy start the engine and place the transmission into neutral. The transmission will begin to pump the ATF into the milk jug and allow it to fill up to the 3 quart line. Once that has happened place the transmission back into park and dispose of the old ATF, then add 3 new quarts of ATF to the dipstick tube. Remember your transmission only pumps the ATF when it's in neutral. Repeat this process until clean ATF is being pumped into the milk jug. Should be about 6 more quarts to complete this process, but you may want to run a couple more quarts through to be sure you get all the old ATF out. Total system holds 9 quarts. When your finished disconnect the 3/8th's hose from the metal transmission cooler line and reconnect it to the radiator. Now start the engine and move the gear selector through all gears, then take the JEEP out for a test drive and ensure the transmission is up to normal operating temperature and while on a flat surface and in neutral pull out the transmission dipstick and verify the fluid is at the full mark.
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post #4 of 29 Old 10-13-2015, 06:55 AM
wingless
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The ATF color changed to dark because the internal parts have degraded, contaminating the fluid.

An ATF fluid flush and change won't hurt, but the parts won't get better.

The transmission frictions have a very thin friction layer, so once it is gone a rebuild is required.

Examine the fluid and contamination in the dropped pan to determine the next steps.


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post #5 of 29 Old 10-13-2015, 07:42 AM
Neil F.
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Brown color for ATF+4 is not an accurate gauge to fluid condition. Note the TSB that was issued when Chrysler switched to +4 with reference to the color

NOTE: THIS BULLETIN APPLIES TO ALL VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH CHRYSLER AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS EXCEPT 1999 AND EARLIER MINIVANS.

Discussion:

A new transmission fluid (ATF+4® - Type 9602) has been developed and is being used as factory fill for all vehicles with Chrysler automatic transmissions. Until now, vehicles originally filled with ATF+2 or ATF+3 were to be serviced with ATF+3. Effective immediately, it is recommended that all vehicles with Chrysler automatic transmissions except for 1999 and earlier minivans be serviced with ATF+4®. ATF+3 should continue to be used for 1999 and earlier minivans because of the potential for torque converter shudder during break in. For all other applications the ATF+4® fluid offers significant benefits as outlined below.

NOTE: ATF+4® MUST ALWAYS BE USED IN VEHICLES THAT WERE ORIGINALLY FILLED WITH ATF+4®.

NOTE: SERVICE INTERVALS DO NOT CHANGE. THE SERVICE INTERVAL CURRENTLY IN EFFECT FOR A GIVEN VEHICLE SHOULD CONTINUE TO BE FOLLOWED.

NOTE: ATF+4® IS COMPATIBLE WITH ATF+3 AND CAN BE USED TO TOP OFF VEHICLES THAT CURRENTLY HAVE ATF+2 OR ATF+3. DO NOT USE ATF+2 OR ATF+3 TO TOP OFF VEHICLES THAT HAVE ATF+4® FLUID.

BENEFITS

Better anti-wear properties
Improved rust/corrosion prevention
Controls oxidation -Eliminates deposits
Controls friction
Retains anti-foaming properties
Superior properties for low temperature operation
FLUID COLOR

Mopar ATF+4® is a World Class Fluid having exceptional durability. However, the red dye used in ATF+4® is not permanent; as the fluid ages it may become darker or appear brown in color. ATF+4® also has a unique odor that may change with age. With ATF+4® fluid, color and odor are no longer indicators of fluid condition and do not support a fluid change.

Parts Required: Qty. Part No. Description
AR 05013457AA Fluid, Transmission, ATF+4® (Type 9602),Quart
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post #6 of 29 Old 10-13-2015, 08:38 AM
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I normally dump some of my fluid in my driveway (I rent). Now I just pay $75 to let a local garage change it for me. I went to school with the owner.

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Why also would he need a rare as hen's teeth Dana 44 out of another TJ which will eventually lead to him swapping in a POS 8.8 because he can't find one?
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post #7 of 29 Old 10-13-2015, 11:18 AM Thread Starter
mgaither0
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The rule of thumb is usually don't get a flush out do a fluid and filter change ?
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post #8 of 29 Old 10-13-2015, 11:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgaither0 View Post
The rule of thumb is usually don't get a flush out do a fluid and filter change ?
Yes. I have an external spin on hydraulic filter that I change out every 2 oil changes and I replace ALL the ATF every 2 years. With the external filter in place, there is no need to change the internal filter.

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post #9 of 29 Old 10-14-2015, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
mgaither0
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thanks for all the tips. I'm going to tackle this in the next couple days.
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post #10 of 29 Old 10-17-2015, 10:56 AM
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I installed a $10 B&M oil drain in my tranny pan and use a LubeLocker gasket for easy pan removal to change the filter. Now, I just drain the pan every 20K or so and change the filter every other oil change. It's about as easy as changing the engine oil and keeps things fresh.
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post #11 of 29 Old 10-17-2015, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airstreamer67 View Post
I installed a $10 B&M oil drain in my tranny pan and use a LubeLocker gasket for easy pan removal to change the filter. Now, I just drain the pan every 20K or so and change the filter every other oil change. It's about as easy as changing the engine oil and keeps things fresh.
That sounds like a good solution.

My Derale Performance #14210 Transmission Cooling Pan is not $10, but it has a threaded drain plug and a threaded plug for a temperature sensor, for easy fluid and filter changes. I am also using the Derale Performance #14010 Transmission Pan Filter Extender to make the most of the extra transmission fluid capacity, as-shown in my 46RH transmission rebuild topic.







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post #12 of 29 Old 10-17-2015, 11:48 AM
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I did mine similar to the above (42RLE trans).

Drop pan, new filter, reinstall pan, add 4 qts ATF+4.

If it is the 42RLE, the pump works in park, too. I marked a gallon jug to show 3 quarts.

Remove return line at hard line from cooler (drivers side line).

Start, fill to 3 qt mark, shut off, add 3 qts, repeat until fluid is clear (10-12 qts for my peace of mind).

Replace line, add fluid to fill mark following proper procedures.

Test drive, check level and add if needed.

I also checked the fluid for the next couple days to verify no leaks and added after all air was out of the system.

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post #13 of 29 Old 10-17-2015, 12:13 PM
JBTJ
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That's what I love about my setup, no need to crawl under the JEEP and mess with removing the pan or internal filter. I can change my filter out in about 15 seconds standing up. And when it comes time to replace the ATF just disconnect the input line to the external filter and pump it out. No mess no worries. Simple and easy.
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post #14 of 29 Old 10-17-2015, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBTJ View Post
Yes. I have an external spin on hydraulic filter that I change out every 2 oil changes and I replace ALL the ATF every 2 years. With the external filter in place, there is no need to change the internal filter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JBTJ View Post
That's what I love about my setup, no need to crawl under the JEEP and mess with removing the pan or internal filter. I can change my filter out in about 15 seconds standing up. And when it comes time to replace the ATF just disconnect the input line to the external filter and pump it out. No mess no worries. Simple and easy.
Yes, yours is very nice. I would still drop the pan periodically to inspect that filter and to inspect / clean the magnet.

This is the custom high-volume five-zone oil change system I put on my boat. It sucks my eight-quart engine sump in 10 seconds.

There is a zone for both engines, both transmissions and the generator.




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post #15 of 29 Old 10-17-2015, 03:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wingless View Post
Yes, yours is very nice. I would still drop the pan periodically to inspect that filter and to inspect / clean the magnet.

This is the custom high-volume five-zone oil change system I put on my boat. It sucks my eight-quart engine sump in 10 seconds.

There is a zone for both engines, both transmissions and the generator.


There is no absolutely need to. I use a 10 micron hydraulic filter, as you may know the internal filter is only rated for 100 microns. So you can see that this filter cleans the ATF 100 times better than the stock one does. So all of the ATF is filtered before it gets to the internal filter. I have dropped the pan before just to have a look see, and it's as clean as a whistle and the magnet has no particles on it what so ever. I also have several rare earth magnets placed around my hydraulic filter to help catch any particles coming thru the filter.
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