Restoration gurus get in here! - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > Models > Jeep CJ Forum > Restoration gurus get in here!

Bill Baird Motorsports DIY parts - NalinMFG.comFS: 2007-2013 Jeep Wrangler "HALO" Angel Eye KitFS: Wranger BRIGHT License Plate LED! Just $3! Great value

Reply
Unread 11-22-2013, 09:07 PM   #1
mscout118
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hoover, AL
Posts: 61
Restoration gurus get in here!

Im gearing up to start my 83 CJ7 project. I need to start collecting the right tools.

I have the usual garage basics: good ratchet/socket set, screwdriver set, tourque wrench, drills with all the attachments, air compressor and various other tools I used to work on motorcycles and a restro I started on a 260Z.

Ill put my plan together when I pick the CJ up next week. Gonna go through (on advice given here) and checking the systems.

Im assuming the wiring will need some tlc and I want some suggestions on an inclusive list of tools I need for that job. Im thinking a set of good wires, connectors, soldering set, shrink wrap and heat gun. Thoughts? Any advice from you guys who have been there done that Im all ears!

Thanks Duke

mscout118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-22-2013, 09:51 PM   #2
Renegade82
Web Wheeler
 
Renegade82's Avatar
1982 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Lewistown, PA
Posts: 3,193
You didn't really specify what the "project" will entail. Is this a frame off plan or just a make it drivable plan.... can you give some further detail?
__________________
The end of a defining era.... JEEP R.I.P. 1941-1986
My frame off Re-Build: (still in progress....)
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/30...e-off-1280850/
Renegade82 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-22-2013, 10:38 PM   #3
mscout118
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hoover, AL
Posts: 61
I think it depends on the overall condition. I havent picked it up yet but its supposed to be rust free and in driveable condition. If its running ok, I may do small projects that are feasable to do before I go frame off. Does that make sense? It sounds good in my head!

I guess thats another question, can I do certian things while the Jeep is whole that wont be a PITA later or without having to do things twice?
mscout118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 04:41 AM   #4
RadioRadio
Registered User
1980 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Akron, OH
Posts: 55
Breaker bar, torx sockets, multimeter, band aids and Tylenol...

I'd start with removing the roll bar, by far the most frustrating part of my teardown.
__________________
RadioRadio | 1980 CJ-5 - Classic Hardtop/Doors, Bestop Tigertop/Bikini, All Steel, 50's Jahco Winch, Tailgate, Vintage CB, Stock Motorola AM/FM
RadioRadio is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 04:54 AM   #5
hutch1200
Web Wheeler
 
hutch1200's Avatar
1979 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: , Pa
Posts: 2,703
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadioRadio View Post
Breaker bar, torx sockets, multimeter, band aids and Tylenol...

I'd start with removing the roll bar, by far the most frustrating part of my teardown.
Band aids & Tylenol are NEEDED. Maybe the whole 1st aid Kit! Get a fire extinquisher or 2. Mount 1 in the jeep when finished.
__________________
The only "FINISHED CJ" is the stripped one in a junkyard w/a bent frame.
hutch1200 is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 07:15 AM   #6
WindKnot
Web Wheeler
 
WindKnot's Avatar
1977 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: , Northern Arizona
Posts: 2,666
Ever hear of Kroil? It is an excellent penetrating oil. You will want some.

Some tools you can get by cheap, like a steering wheel puller set. On others you're going to want as good as you can afford and then step up a grade. One example is anything TORX. If you can only afford one set of sockets, I'd suggest going with impact sockets They're stronger than a normal ratchet set and they'll always work down in strength requirements. It's done all the time, but it's a poor idea to use a ratchet socket with an impact wrench. They're just not as strong.

MOST IMPORTANT IS A FACTORY SERVICE MANUAL SPECIFIC TO YOUR YEAR. A Haynes or Chilton's Manual is a waste of time. They're general and not specific. Then, READ it!
__________________
Paved roads are just for getting you to the starting point!
WindKnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 07:46 AM   #7
JeepHammer
Running On Empty...
1973 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: South West Indiana
Posts: 9,954
What wind knot said, X2.

I suggest you buy a paper manual, and you download all the manuals for your year model you can.
They don't always agree, but if you have three or four, you can reach a 'Consensus' if you run into a misprint or dilemma...

----------------

You will find even a small air compressor (with a BIG tank) invaluable.
One of those cheap sand blasters is a nice thing to have, blow off the rust/crud before you have to work on things,
Remove rust so you can get rust killing coating to stick...

Air tools would be good, especially an impact wrench and air ratchet.

---------------

You will need, And I meant these are "MUST HAVE" items,

A case of penetrating oil. Something like PB Blaster for common things, and something like Areokriol for stubborn parts.
There is nothing like Aerokriol, but it's expensive.

A small propane torch/tank.
There are about 1,000 parts/fasteners on your vehicle that will loosen up without twisting off if you apply a little heat & penetrating oil to them...

An electric or air powered drill, and wire brush set.
There is nothing like being able to take the rust/crud off things, and this is the fast way.
Removing rust makes threads come apart so much faster/easier and might save you twisted off bolts.

A $6 'Yoga' or 'Sleeping Bag' mat. One of those closed cell foam jobs.
This makes getting under vehicles, saving knees, butts ect. a snap, and it will also give you someplace reasonably CLEAN to lay out parts while working.
For $6 it's cheap and it's amazingly handy.

Since EVERYONE that buys a CJ needs to pull down and inspect the front axle/spindles,
Spindle nut socket, around $10.
DO NOT use a chisel for the spindle nuts! Only idiots do that.

Around $20 gets you a spindle puller, another very handy tool for pulling down that front axle/spindles.

You will find a slide hammer a very handy tool, if nothing more than for the spindle puller...
Great for dents, pulling on stubborn parts, yanking on things that don't want to move, ect.
You will find pulling seals difficult without a slide hammer, but with a slide hammer it's a snap.

If you work on brake lines or fuel lines, a line wrench set. Do NOT try to take brake line fittings apart without a GOOD QUALITY line wrench set (Craftsman or better, no harbor freight).

If you work with things like timing, carb, ect...
You MUST have a timing light, good vacuum/pressure gauge, ect.

Don't forget deep well sockets. Six point, they bite better and don't round off fasteners as easily.
If you are smart, you will get an 'Impact' set of deep well sockets, you can hammer the crap out of those and not break them.

The usual assortment of snap ring pliers. You will find snap rings in a lot of places, and a variety of plier types will make life easier.

Electrical,
TEST LIGHT, one with a bulb, not LEDs.
An inexpensive multimeter.
A GOOD SET OF THE FOLLOWING, (NOT the combination tools, one size does nothing)
Crimping tool, Channel Lock makes the best for my money,
A good wire cutter/stripper. Dedicated to COPPER WIRE and nothing else. Side cuts suck...
If you work with larger 'Cable' size wire, you will need a heavy cutter that cuts CLEANLY, again, COPPER ONLY!

I suggest you get some tool separation.
If all your work is going to be done in a shop, then get one of those roll around carts with two or three shelves.
These are MUCH more handy than tool boxes, you can move them to the work and you are MUCH MORE LIKELY to put the tools back on the cart when you are done than pile tools up somewhere or leave them where you were working...

Don't be bashful, stick those socket rails to the sides of the cart, attach things where they are handy, leave pilers hanging on the edge of the tray where they are handy...
I paid tons of money for tool boxes, then spent half my life running back and forth for tools... MUCH better to roll the tools up to the job and be HANDY so you don't have to hunt for them...

SEPARATE YOUR ELECTRICAL/IGNITION/CARB TOOLS FROM THE 'COMMON' TOOLS!
You won't be as temped to mess up your electrical tools, and you won't be as likely to throw an impact on your timing light...
(Ask me how I know that... )

Don't forget shop supplies!
A 'Shop' type towel roll, some regular paper towels, the usual assortment of 'Never-Seize' and 'Lock-Tite', plenty of lock washers and lock nuts, both prevailing torque and 'Nylock', cotter pins, roll pins, 'O' rings, ect.
You can get 'Assortment' packs pretty cheap, and it sure beats forgetting you needed to put one in but didn't later...

LOTS OF SMALL CONTAINERS AND SOME LABELS!
Save every coffee can, peanut butter jar, ect. and LABEL what's in it!
Clean things off as you take them off, keep parts together!

You will find with any kind of restoration, either the parts will self destruct on disassembly, or go into hiding shortly after removal.
Get yourself a 'White Board' and some masking tape, sharpie.
Stick masking tape to the vehicle and write on it what needs to be done, where you left off, and put small bites of the project on the white board and cross them off as you go so you can see progress.
Most people loose direction at one time or another, and seeing progress on the white board helps keep you motivated, and keeps you from forgetting to pick up what you need to finish each section of the project.

The tape on the vehicle keeps you remembering where you left off, keeps you spotting things that need attention but not while you are doing TODAYS project... This keeps a LOT of small details from getting overlooked...
And the tape can remind you EXACTLY where you left off, so you don't wade in there looking around trying to remember where you left off and what needs to be done... STAY FOCUSED... Small Bites... Do it RIGHT the first time... If you put the hours in, the end result WILL HAPPEN, but staying focused is a problem with longer term projects, especially when you keep finding other things that need attention...
JeepHammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 07:57 AM   #8
JeepHammer
Running On Empty...
1973 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: South West Indiana
Posts: 9,954
I second the FIRE EXTINGUISHER!

PENETRATING OIL AND OPEN TORCH MAKE FOR A NEED FOR FIRE CONTROL!

Rust burns.
So do cobwebs, some kinds of mud, old oil residue, unseen wiring/rubber hoses, ect.

I've got a 5 pound extinguisher on my roll around cart because I'm a 'Ready, FIRE, Aim' kind of guy...
And I've got a 10 pounder on the end of the workbench.
45 years of doing this have taught me fire and shops don't mix, but they seem attracted to each other!

There is usually a bucket of water sitting around somewhere handy, mostly for quenching hot metal, but works equally well for fire control...

---------------------

Another thing, MECHANIC's GLOVES will save you countless busted knuckles, scrapes, pinches, ect.
They aren't appropriate for some kinds of work, but they should be mandatory when you pick up a hammer or start gouging with a screwdriver, ect...
JeepHammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 08:09 AM   #9
rplivin
Member
1985 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Jasper, Alabama
Posts: 138
Might have missed it but some shop hammers, set of punches and brass drifts. A good camera to take pictures, like stated stay focused, keep a notebook of things ordered and things needed.
I bought the cd of FSM off eBay and its a must.
rplivin is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 09:57 AM   #10
mscout118
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Hoover, AL
Posts: 61
Thanks guys! Good stuff, I shall repay someday in beer or cigars if possible! If not my witty sense of humor, natural charm and pleasure to be around should be enough!

Seriously thanks. I'm looking forward to starting this project and sharing it with the board.

Duke
mscout118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 10:39 AM   #11
Hilux
Registered User
1980 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by RadioRadio View Post
Breaker bar, torx sockets, multimeter, band aids and Tylenol...

I'd start with removing the roll bar, by far the most frustrating part of my teardown.
Tell me about it I broke about three high quality torx sockets taking mine off , I cant believe how such a small shank on a bolt will hold so good luckily none of them broke off in the tub .
Hilux is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 11:40 AM   #12
jetmech1
Registered User
1986 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 178
Anything is possible with a cutting torch, 220 mig welder, heavy vise
jetmech1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-23-2013, 12:44 PM   #13
dslywalker
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Glendale,Arizona
Posts: 1,554
did anyone mention beerbox and church key
__________________
Jeep Naked
Put some color in your Cheeks
dslywalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-24-2013, 12:55 AM   #14
hutch1200
Web Wheeler
 
hutch1200's Avatar
1979 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: , Pa
Posts: 2,703
2nd Job. Or a way to embezzle from the household budget.
__________________
The only "FINISHED CJ" is the stripped one in a junkyard w/a bent frame.
hutch1200 is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 11-24-2013, 06:00 AM   #15
Always2L8
Registered User
1982 CJ8 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Clearwater, Florida
Posts: 278
If you're in no hurry to remove rust, this works well for smaller parts. Use a bigger tub for larger parts.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Elec...val-aka-Magic/


Quote:
Originally Posted by hutch1200 View Post
2nd Job. Or a way to embezzle from the household budget.
Does a meth lab and or grow house count as a second job?
Always2L8 is online now   Reply With Quote




Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.