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Unread 06-19-2012, 09:57 PM   #1
Caish
Registered User
1987 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 586
Identify your Engine....

I got curious how to identify the casting codes on my 258.
Well lots of results sent me to dead links.
geocities sites that are doa now etc.
So I decided to use the internets wayback machine to try and recover the data.
Sometimes its works sometimes it doesn't depends on if there is a robots.txt
in the directory or now.

Here is what I found.

Quote:
Where do I find my build code?

OVER/UNDER SIZE CODE
UP TO MID 1967: Some engines will have a second three letter code under or beside the serial number or Day Build Code. This code is used to indicate under and/or over size parts. All three letters will be present if any part was factory altered from original specifications. If .010 inch over or under would not correct the fit of the part(s), they were replaced. No engine was fitted from the factory with parts that were over .010 inch above or below standard. The code represented the bore (1st letter), main bearings (2nd letter), and rod bearings (3rd letter). In any position, an "A" indicates standard size, "B" .010 inch undersize, and "C" .010 inch oversize. The code is located directly below the serial number or Engine Day Build Code on 172-195.6 six cylinder engines, on the boss directly above the oil filter on 199-258 six cylinder and AMC built four cylinder engines, and on the valve cover tag on V8 engines. MID 1967 AND LATER: A different letter represents each part and the modification. The letter is located on the boss directly above the oil filter on six cylinder engines, on the valve cover tag on V8 engines. One or more letters may be present: B- 0.010" oversize cylinder bore
C- 0.010" oversize camshaft bearing bore
M- 0.010" undersize connecting main bearings
P- 0.010" undersize connecting connecting rod bearings
ENGINE DAY BUILD CODE
AMC used a the "Engine Day Build Code" as a serial number for all engines starting in 1960. This code gives the date the engine left the assembly plant fully running and has a code for the engine size/type.

NOTE: This code is NOT necessarily the same as found on the VIN. In some cases it is, but often the VIN code changed whereas the build code remained for any size engine.

An important thing to remember about AMC engines is that changes were made on a calendar year basis, not model year. The engine plant ran on its own schedule! This is why some 1980 model vehicles have the "heavy" 258 and others the "light" 258 -- changes were made early in calendar year 1980.

The Engine Day Build Code consists of six characters:

1. Year built code 2 & 3. Number of the month 4. Engine size/type code 5 & 6. Day built

Thus, "409C21" indicates 1962, September, 195.6 OHV (cast iron), 21st day. The only way to determine the year is 1962 instead of 1971, 1984, or 1992 is to know that the 195.6 OHV engine was discontinued after 1965, and what a 195.6 looks like (very different than the 199/232/258). Most codes do not overlap very much. For those that do (such as 3 -- 1961, 1970, 1979, 1983, 1993) casting numbers may have to be consulted if the engine date is important, such as for a restoration.

Day Built "Year Codes"
1=1959 2-1960 3=1961 4=1962 5=1963
6=1964 7=1965 8=1966 9=1967 1=1968
2=1969 3=1970 4=1971 5=1972 6=1973
7=1974 8=1975 9=1976 1=1977 2=1978
3=1979
Beginning in 1980 the last digit of the year is used (1980=0, 1981= 1, etc.)
Engine Size/Type Codes

1960-1967: AMC complicated things these years by using a different code in the VIN of each model for the same engine in at least 66 and 67. This confuses many sources! The codes below are used in the Engine Day Build Code, which is the same for all models. Serial number codes will be found with serial number decoding information. Years following code is the years the engines were available.

A- 195.6 1 bbl (60-65, L-head)
A- 199 1 bbl (66-67)
B- 195.6 (61-64, OHV aluminum, 1 or 2 bbl)
C- 195.6 OHV (61-65, OHV iron, 1 or 2 bbl)
D- 250 (60-61, 2 or 4 bbl)
E- 327 2 bbl (60-66)
F- 327 4 bbl (60-66)
G- 287 2 bbl (63-66)
H- 290 2 bbl (66-67)
J- 199 1 bbl (66-67)
L- 232 (64-67, 1 or 2 bbl)
N- 290 4 bbl (66-67)
Z- 343 4 bbl (67)

1968-2001: Someone at AMC decided to simplify things, or maybe the U.S. Government decided for them since engines now had to be qualified for emissions by type and size? In any case, all models used the same codes for the same engines.

Some codes were used for more than one engine. Year ranges are given for code use.

VIN and engine code numbers are different! This can be confusing. The 4.0 has an engine code of MX, but there are three different VIN codes (M, L, S). The earliest VIN code usually matches the engine code, later versions of the same engine may have different VIN codes but engine code usually remains the same.

A- 199 1 bbl (70)
A- 258 1 bbl (71-79)
B- 258 1 bbl Low Compression (71-74, Jeep ONLY)
B- 151 2 bbl (80-83, GM 2.5L)
B- 126 Diesel (85-87, Renault 2.1L, Jeep XJ ONLY)
C- 258 2 bbl (4.2L, 76-89)
E- 232 1 bbl (70-79)
F- 232 1 bbl Low Compression (71-74, Jeep ONLY)
F- 145 Diesel (81-86, Jeep ONLY)
G- 232 2 bbl (70-74)
G- 121 2 bbl (77-79)
H- 290 2 bbl (68-69)
H- 304 2 bbl (70-79)
J- 199 1 bbl (68-69)
L- 232 1 or 2 bbl (68-69)
M- 304 2 bbl Low Compression (71-74, Jeep ONLY)
MX- 242 MPI (4.0L MPFI, 86-01, Jeep ONLY)
N- 290 4 bbl (68-69)
N- 360 2 bbl (5.9L, 70-91)
P- 360 4 bbl (70-77)
R- 134 1 bbl (70, F-head, Jeep ONLY)
S- 343 2 bbl (68-69)
T- 134 1 bbl Low Compression (70, F-head, Jeep ONLY)
U- 150 (84-01, AMC 2.5L, Jeep & Eagle ONLY)
W- 390 4 bbl (68-69)
W- 173 2 bbl (84-86, GM 2.8L V6, Jeep XJ ONLY)
X- 390 (70)
Y- 390 (70 Machine)
Y- 318 MPI (93-96, Chrysler 5.2L, Jeep Grand Cherokee ONLY)
Z- 343 4 bbl (68-69)
Z- 401 (71-77)

For more information on AMC cars check the "American Independent Magazine" website: http://home.att.net/~farna . An "AMC Annual" is published yearly listing all known AMC and related makes clubs. There may be one in your area! The AMC Annual may be purchased without subscribing.

The very best thing you can do for your AMC is join a local club. If there are no local clubs, you should still consider joining one of the national clubs. AIM offers information and some support for ALL AMC vehicles, the clubs tend to gravitate toward specific interests and offer some support, such as holding meets at many locations across the country, that AIM can't. Even if you do join a local club, you may be interested in services from one or more of the national clubs as well. But if you are a genuine "AMC nut", subscribe to AIM to get a REAL fix!

Frank Swygert -- Gulfport, MS
Publisher, "American Independent Magazine" (AIM)
Supporting all AMC related vehicles, 1902-1987
Website: http://home.att.net/~farna
Return to Top

Jeep Block Casting Numbers
Source page for the data in this table
MAKE AND YEAR
C.I.D. LITRE BORE CYL. DESCRIPTION
BLOCK CASTING NUMBER
HEAD CASTING NUMBER
CRANK CASTING NUMBER
AMC
1983-88
150 2.5 3.875 L-4 Eagle, 7/16"
3239448
3244893
3239611
AMC
1988-71
150 2.5 3.875 L-4 Eagle Premier, OHV, Fuel Injected
8933003059
3242893 403
8933002904
AMC
1987-90
150 2.5 3.875 L-4 Fuel Inj., 2.06" Crank Neck, 7/16" Head Bolts, Wrangler
8933004200
408
8933002904
AMC
1986-90
150 2.5 3.875 L-4 Carb., 1/2" Head Bolts, 2.06" Crank Neck, Wrangler
53005532
.
8933002904
AMC
1991-92
150 2.5 3.875 L-4 Fuel Injected, 7/16" Head Bolts, Wrangler
63008403
117
8933002904
AMC
1970-72
232 3.8 3.75 L-6 W/Rocker Shaft, Spec. Flat Back or Flanged Style Crank
3199962
3218618
3189886
3170717
3211040
3172216
3172218
3188947
3204904
AMC
1972-74
232 3.8 3.75 L-6 W/Rocker Shaft, Spec. Flat Back or Flanged Style Crank
3213867
3218618
3222380
3710717
3189886
3211040
3213809
3224490
3214722
AMC
1975-79
232 3.8 3.75 L-6
3224098
3227445
3227258
3241722
AMC
1987-90
241 4.0 3.875 L-6
53005535
8933002665
2686
3003453
AMC
1991-93
241 4.0 3.875 L-6
53008405
7120
3003453
AMC
1970-72
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 W/Rocker Shaft, Spec. Flat Back or Flanged Style Crank
3199962
3211040
3170717
3189886
3199798
RD67703
AMC
1970-72
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 W/Rocker Shaft
3218618
3222380
3213867
3211040
3170717
3214723
AMC
1975-79
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 Spec. Location of Temp. Send. Unit, 1/2" Head Bolts
3227445
3224098
3227258
3214723
AMC
1980
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 Temp. Send. Unit at Top Rear of Head
3235077
3227258
3214723
AMC
1981-85
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 7/16" Head Bolts
3235444
3933000
3224480
3241656
3235477
AMC
1986
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 1/2" Head Bolts
3235444
3933002
3235477
AMC
1987-89
258 4.2 3.75 L-6 2.06" Crank Neck, Spec. if Alum. or Plastic Valve Cover, 1/2" Head Bolts
3235444
3661
3727
AMC
1970-79
304 5.0 3.75 V-8
3195527
3212990
3218086
3233324
RD51261
4487237
3195292
3214724
AMC
1970-78
360 5.9 4.08 V-8 Spec. Stud Type or Bolt Down Rocker Cyl. Heads. Must Have Head Cast #
3195528
3196291
3220502
3231475
3216090
3219993
3233344
RD51261
4487237
3195292
3214724
3214754
AMC
1971-76
401 6.6 4.165 V-8 Spec. Stud Type or Bolt Down Rocker Cyl. Heads. Must Have Head Cast #
3198951
3196291
3219993
3216090
3220502
3231475
3190079
3196921
3214725
3220411
3199842
Quote:
AMC 258 4.2L
Block, Crankshaft & Head Casting Numbers

The stamped numbers (month, etc.) are far less important than the casting numbers....
Except for an outside ID of a 232 ... Forth digit: "A" = 258, "C" = 232

I do not have the 232 crank casting numbers.

1975-79 258 4.2L 1/2" Head bolts

Blocks: 3227445 and 3224098
Head: 3227258
Crank: 3214723

1980 258 4.2L 1/2" Head bolts

Block: 3235077
Head: 3227258
Crank: 3214723

1981-85 258 4.2L 7/16" Head bolts

Block: 3235444
Heads: 3933000, 3224480, and 3241656
Crank: 3235477

1986 258 4.2L 1/2" Head bolts

Block: 3227444
Head: 3933002
Crank: 3235477
Quote:

AMC Megasite
All the AMC/Rambler facts you can stand!

AMC Engines
Four-Cylinder
Six-Cylinder
V-8
Horsepower Ratings
Return to AMTech Home


Four-Cylinder Engines
Wankel?
Audi 2.0L
GM 2.5L
AMC/Jeep 2.5L
Specification Chart

This is the department AMC was always lacking in. They should have developed a four themselves long before they eventually did. Instead they found themselves in quite a predicament when the first gas shortages of the seventies hit the U.S. auto industry very hard. They did, in fact, have at least one four-cylinder in the inventory in the early sixties. This was the air cooled V-4 used in the Mighty Mite air transportable Jeep. It was, however, unsuited for passenger car use, especially with ever increasing emissions requirements.

A Wankel Interlude...
Throughout the early sixties engineers at AMC had worked on many different engine configurations, more than one four-cylinder amongst them. So how is it that they did not have a four-cylinder design by the mid seventies? The answer is in the Wankel Rotary engine.

The rotary held lots of promise in the early 70s, and almost every auto manufacturer was experimenting with the design. AMC had even engaged in a cooperative venture with Renault to co-develop an unusual five chamber experimental rotary that had a rather conventional valve system. This engine used a four lobe rotar rather than a three lobe as in the traditional Wankel design, which also used ports in the side of the block instead of valves (like a modern two stroke engine). The design produced a rather tall package that looked much like an aircraft radial engine. Only an experimental model was built.

AMC purchased a license to produce the promising Wankel rotary from Curtiss Wright, the exclusive North American distributor, in March of 1973. General Motors was also working on a Wankel design, and were much further along than AMC. At some point AMC and GM struck a deal for GM to provide AMC with rotary engines rather than AMC making their own. This would save AMC lots of development time and money, and they were always short of money by this point due to sky-rocketing tool and development costs. Development and tooling for the Pacer, which was designed specifically for the new engine, had already started hitting AMC pretty hard.

GM, however, was having troubles of their own. The GM wankel was producing less power and fuel mileage than expected due to strict emissions regulations. The rotary, by nature, produced a rather high amount of hydrocarbon emissions. The engineers weren't sure how to solve this problem, and the engine wouldn't pass future emissions standards as it was. GM asked the U.S. Congress for a 10 year emissions freeze, at least on the rotary. This would give the engineering department time to work on the hydrocarbon problem. Congress said no, so GM axed the project just one year before the Pacer was to be introduced. AMC had no choice but to modify the Pacer to accept their existing six cylinder engines. Mazda, which had been producing a rotary since 1967, solved the hydrocarbon problem and continues making rotaries to this day.

Why the wankel in the first place? It is compact and lightweight, with fewer moving parts than conventional reciprocating engines. This means it has the potential to be cheaper to produce, easier to repair, and more reliable. It isn't more efficient, however. It takes as much fuel to produce power as any other engine. The only way to take full advantage of the size and weight is to design a new car around the engine. GM wanted to take advantage of the potential manufacturing cost reductions with high volume production. They weren't interested in revamping their entire automobile line to take advantage of the package, they wanted something that could be used in existing designs until they were ready for new ones. With the first fuel crisis beginning and uncertainty in meeting future emission standards, the engine simply lost its attractiveness. GM engineers felt there was still a lot of potential in their existing reciprocating designs, so refocused their efforts in that direction instead.

Back to the in-line four...
Because of the time required to develop a reliable engine, AMC first attempted to buy a design they could build themselves under license. Volkswagen/Audi had such an engine, a new 2.0L OHC that was to be used in an upcoming new Porsche model and some light trucks. VW was willing to sell not only a license to produce the engine, but eventually the tooling as well. The only catch was that AMC couldn't use the Audi or VW name on the engine. From 1977 to 1979 AMC assembled these 2.0L engines from major castings imported from Germany with some parts made in the U.S. AMC machined the castings and assembled the engines at a plant in Richmond, Indiana. The deal to acquire the tooling fell through for two reasons: AMC wasn't selling enough of the engines, and VW was selling more than it had anticipated by 1979.

The Gremlin and Spirit were much heavier than any of the Audis the engine was originally used in. The little 2.0L four was barely adequate for them with a four speed transmission, and felt under powered with an automatic transmission. Add air conditioning and power accessories and it got worse. Even so, the 2.0 was offered in the larger Concord (sedan only, not wagons) in 1978. It wasn't used in 79 Concords and few equipped 78s (I've only seen one in a salvage yard, none running). AMC dropped the little engine after 1979 because of dismal sales over the three year period it was produced. This worked out fine for VW, because the Porsche 924, introduced in 1977, was selling much better than anticipated.

The Porsche 924 version came with fuel injection and electronic ignition, but was very "high strung" -- it required high rpm to produce much power. While acceptable for a sports car, it would have been unsuited for something as heavy as the Gremlin and Spirit, especially in every day driving situations. AMC stated that they didn't consider fuel injection and electronic ignition due to lack of experience with such devices. In AMCs defense, they intended to produce a smaller, lighter car that would be more suitable to that engine, but they were unable to afford development. The smaller car eventually came as the Renault Alliance.

The easiest and best upgrade for one of these engines, which uses a unique transmission bell housing pattern, is an electronic ignition. One 1979 2.0L Spirit owner reported that a simple Pertronix ignition module gave the car a noticeable boost in power and fuel economy. When you have so little power to begin with, even a small increase helps! This was in a four speed equipped Spirit with no power accessories, not even brakes!

Until AMC could get an adequate four-cylinder of their own into production they bought GM 2.5L "Iron Duke" engines. This engine had just enough more torque than the little 2.0L to make a difference. They were used in cars and Jeep vehicles through 1983. AMC only used them for the three year period 1980-83.

The new, downsized Jeep Cherokee XJ was introduced in 1984 along with a new AMC 2.5L four-cylinder engine. Because it shares the same size with the previously used GM four it is often confused with it (the AMC four is actually 150 cid, 2.46L, the GM 151 cid, 2.5L). The new four was created by cutting the two center cylinders out of a 258 six block. A single piece rear main seal was adopted instead of the 258 two piece seal and the GM 2.5L bell housing pattern was used. This saved AMC some money as they were already casting bell housings for the GM four and having Chrysler make 904 automatic transmissions with the GM four bell pattern. An entirely new head with better ports and combustion chamber was designed. A single throat carburetor was used for the first year, with throttle body fuel injection added in 1985 and multi-port injection in 1991. This engine was adopted by Dodge to replace the 2.2L as the base engine of the Dakota mid-size truck around 1991. The only AMC passenger car to receive this engine was the 1984 Eagle 4WD. The last 2WD AMC passenger car was built in 1983 and the four was dropped from the Eagle line after 1984.

See "Engine Serial Numbers" for identifying specific engines and manufacture date.


AMC Four-Cylinder Engine Chart (1977-2002, OHV unless otherwise specified)
Size: CID (Liters)
Bore x Stroke (inches) Years Used, Specifications
Notes
121 (2.0L), 3.41 x 3.32
OHC (Overhead Cam)
1977-1979, 80 hp @ 4000 rpm, 114 ft/lb @ 2750 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
License built from VW/Audi
151 (2.5L), 4.0 x 3.0
1980-1983, 99 hp @ 4000 rpm, 134 ft/lb @ 2400 rpm, 2V, 8.3:1
Purchased from GM
150 (2.5L), 3.876 x 3.188
1984, 83 hp @ 4200 rpm, 116 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 1V, 9.2:1
Eagle and Jeep
1985-1988, 117 hp @ 5000 rpm, 135 ft/lb @ 3000 rpm, TBI, 9.2:1
Jeep only
1988-1989, 111 hp @ 4750 rpm, 142 ft/lb @ 2500 rpm, MPI, 9.0:1
Eagle Premier only
1989-1990, 121 hp @ 5250 rpm, 141 ft/lb @ 3250 rpm, TBI, 9.2:1
Jeep only
1991-2002, 130 hp @ 5250 rpm, 149 ft/lb @ 3250 rpm, MPI, 9.1:1
Jeep and Dodge Dakota

Return to top of page



Six-Cylinder Engines
Nash and Hudson Sixes
195.6
232/199/258/4.0L
GM V-6
Specification Chart
The old Nash 252.6 OHV engine was used through 1956 in the big Nash models only. This design dates back to at least 1934! The rear oil seal consisted of just a slinger and spiral grooves in the crankshaft just behind the rear main through 1947, after which a neoprene seal was used. The old Hudson L-head sixes were still produced for the Nash bodied Hudsons of 1955-56. The Hudson six design first appeared in 1948. The Hudson six was one of the most respected engines in its day, remaining competitive in amateur racing through the early sixties. It was with this engine that Hudson won many NASCAR races in the mid and late fifties, holding the record for the most wins until the mid seventies. All 57 Nash and Hudson models received the GEN-1 327 V8.

The 195.6 in-line six family (see 195.6 FAQ ) was produced from 1940 through 1965. It was produced in three sizes as an L-head, 172.6, 184, and 195.6; but only in the largest size in the OHV configuration. The 195.6 block was converted to OHV for the 1956 model year by altering the right side of the block (valve side on the L-head version) and making a new head, pistons, and valve train. The crankshaft, rods, timing gears and cover, and lower block design were retained, but the water pump was moved from the right side of the engine to the front of the block just above the timing cover. The block was converted back to an L-head for the 1958 Rambler American, but retained the new style water pump. A die-cast aluminum block version was built from 1961 to 1963. There were some problems with the engine since it was a little more delicate than the cast iron version and required more attention to maintenance schedules. The main reason production stopped was lack of consumer demance and acceptance. By the early sixties the design was outdated, and totally inadequate for modern driving by the time production ended in 1965.

A new six, the 232, was introduced in 1964. This was a seven main bearing six, probably the strongest passenger car six available at the time of introduction. Ford, Chevy, and Chrysler sixes of the time still used four main bearings, though Ford and Chrysler would introduce seven main bearing in-line sixes shortly after. A shorter stroke version, the 199, was introduced in 1965 as a replacement for the aging 195.6. In 1971 the deck height of the six-cylinder block was increased by 1/8". The extra room allowed creation of a 258 cubic inch engine with a new longer stroke crank and rod. The 199 was dropped after 1970, making the 232 the smallest six. The 232 was dropped after 1979, leaving AMC with the 258 as its only six-cylinder engine. In 1986 the 258 was reworked into the 242 (4.0L) for use in the Jeep XJ and MJ (downsized Cherokee and Comanche pickup) lines. Bore was increased from 3.75" (common to all 199/232/258 engines) to 3.875", but the stroke was reduced from the 258's 3.90" to 3.41". This allowed quicker spin up while retaining adequate displacement. A new head design derived from the AMC 2.5L four (see " Four-Cylinder Engines ", above) was used for the 242. The 242 also used direct port fuel injection and electronic ignition, developed with the help of Renault, who owned the majority interest in AMC (46%).

A GM 2.8L V-6 was purchased for the XJ Cherokee until the 4.0L six was ready (1984 and 1985). Jeep marketing planners felt that a six-cylinder engine was needed to help sales. It is believed that the 2.8L was chosen because it shared the same bell housing pattern and transmissions as the 2.5L AMC four. This would reduce the cost of using the engine as any other would require tooling for a new automatic bell housing or an adapter, or purchasing transmissions from an additional source. Another model transmission would mean additional service costs and headaches as well (since Jeep had used the 2.5L GM four they were already equipped with diagnostic tools for the similar emission controls of the 2.8). The 2.8L could also use the same drivetrain as the 2.5L four. This saved money, but in reality the diminutive V-6 put out little more power than the four. V-6 model Cherokees are routinely avoided now. A later model fuel injected four, even the first TBI models, puts out as much horse power and nearly as much torque as the V-6. The Jeep four is also a more durable engine.

Complicating matters is the fact that GM had trouble with the rear main seal of 1984 and earlier 2.8 V-6 models. The problem was solved in 1985 with a new seal. A 3.1L or 3.4L V-6 will bolt in place of a 2.8L but most of those were made for front wheel drive applications. Front drive engines would require custom mounts and reworking the exhaust system. GM did make a service replacement 3.1L block with mounting points for front and rear drive vehicles. Some early 3.1 equipped cars have been found to have these blocks, so check 1991-92 models. Note that the 3.1/3.4 is a different block than the earlier 83-86 3.0, which was based on the Buick 231 (3.8L) block. Simply replacing the carburetor on a 2.8L equipped Jeep with fuel injection from a later model GM would be a vast improvement and the most economical upgrade (from 115 hp to 135 hp from GM "A" body, plus better economy and driveability).

See "Engine Serial Numbers" for identifying specific engines and manufacture date.


AMC six-cylinder Engine Chart (1954-2002, OHV unless otherwise specified)
NOTE: pre 1972 hp figures are GROSS HP , 1972 and later are NET HP .
There are no significant changes between 1971 and 1972 engines.
Size: CID (Liters)
Bore x Stroke (inches)
Years Used, Specifications
Notes
173 (2.8L), 3.5 x 2.99
1984-1985, 115 hp @ 4800 rpm, 150 ft/lb @ 3500 rpm, 2V, 8.5:1
V-6, Purchased from GM, Jeep only
184 (3.0L), 3.125 x 4.0
L-head
1954, 85 hp @ 3800 rpm, 150 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 7.25:1
Rambler w/manual transmission only
195.6 (3.2L), 3.125 x 4.25
L-head 1954-55, 90 hp @ 3800 rpm, 150 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 7.3:1
1954 Rambler w/automatic transmission only, 1955 all Rambler.
1955, 100 hp @ 3800 rpm, 155 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 2V, 7.3:1
Nash Statesman w/ manual transmission only
1954-55, 110 hp @ 3800 rpm, 160 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
Nash Statesman w/automatic transmission only
1958-61, 90 hp @ 3800 rpm, 150 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1961-65, 90 hp @ 3800 rpm, 160 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1958-65 used in American only, all transmission types
195.6 (3.2L), 3.125 x 4.25
Note: aluminum block version made 1961-64, 127 & 138 hp., same specs as iron block.

1956, 120 hp @ 4200 rpm, 170 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 7.5:1
1957, 125 hp @ 4200 rpm, 175 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1957, 135 hp @ 4500 rpm, 180 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
1958-65, 125 hp @ 4200 rpm, 180 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.7:1
1958-60 all, 1961-65 American only
1958-65, 138 hp @ 4500 rpm, 185 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 8.7:1
1961-64, 127 hp @ 4200 rpm, 180 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.7:1
Classic only
202 (3.3L), 3.0 x 4.75
L-head 1955-56, 120 hp @ 4000 rpm, 170 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 7.5:1
1956, 130 hp @ 4000 rpm, 175 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2 x 1V, 8.0:1
Hudson Wasp only (all)
232 (3.8L), 3.75 x 3.5
1964-70, 145 hp @ 4300 rpm, 215 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.5:1
1964-70, 155 hp @ 4400 rpm, 222 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 2V, 8.5:1
1971, 135 hp @ 4000 rpm, 215 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1972-74, 100 hp @ 3600 rpm, 185 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1975-76, 90 hp @ 3050 rpm, 170 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1977-79, 90 hp @ 3400 rpm, 164 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
243 (4.0L), 3.874 x 3.441
1987-88, 150 hp @ 4300 rpm, 210 ft/lb @ 2100 rpm, MPI, 8.8:1
1989-90, 177 hp @ 4500 rpm, 224 ft/lb @ 2500 rpm, MPI, 8.8:1
1991-02, 190 hp @ 4750 rpm, 225 ft/lb @ 4000 rpm, MPI, 8.8:1
Jeep only (all)
252.6 (4.1L), 3.5 x 4.375
1954-56, 130 hp @ 3700 rpm, 220 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 7.6:1
1954-56, 140 hp @ 4000 rpm, ??? ft/lb @ ???? rpm, 2 x1V, 7.6:1
Nash only (all)
258 (4.2L), 3.75 x 3.9
1971, 150 hp @ 3800 rpm, 240 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1972-74, 110 hp @ 3500 rpm, 195 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1975-77, 95 hp @ 3050 rpm, 180 ft/lb @ 2100 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
1976-81, 110 hp @ 3500 rpm, 195 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 1V, 8.0:1
Jeep only, not available in California
1976, 120 hp @ 3400 rpm, 200 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
Optional, Pacer only
1977, 114 hp @ 3600 rpm, 192 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
1978, 120 hp @ 3600 rpm, 201 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
1979-81, 110 hp @ 3200 rpm, 210 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 8.3:1
1979, 100 hp @ 3400 rpm, 200 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 1V, 8.1:1
Optional, California models only
1982, 110 hp @ 3000 rpm, 205 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 8.3:1
1983-88, 110 hp @ 3200 rpm, 210 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 9.2:1
Spirit, Concord, and Eagle only
1983-86, 102 hp @ 3000 rpm, 204 ft/lb @ 1650 rpm, 2V, 9.2:1
Jeep only
1986-87, 112 hp @ 3000 rpm, 210 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 2V, 9.2:1
Jeep only
308 (5.0L), 3.8125 x 4.5
L-head
1955-56, 165 hp @ 3800 rpm, 264 ft/lb @ 1800 rpm, 1V, 7.5:1
1955-56, 175 hp @ 4000 rpm, ??? ft/lb @ ???? rpm, 2 x1V, 8.0:1
Hudson Hornet only (all)


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V-8 Engines
Packard (1955-56 320/352)
GEN-1 (1956-66 250/287/327)
GEN-2 (1966-69 290/343/390)
GEN-3 (1970-91 304/260/401 & 1970 390)
The "319" Head Myth
Specification Chart
Note: AMC designed and built V-8 engines are generally classified as GEN-1, GEN-2, and GEN-3 (GEN forgeneration). Although the GEN-2 and GEN-3 share essentially the same block except for a deck height increase, the head, intake manifold, and exhaust manifolds were also changed. Combined the changes justify the separate designation.

The first V-8 AMC used was the Packard 320. Packard's "Ultramatic" automatic transmission was the only trans available with this engine. It was used only in 1955, with a larger 352 version used in 1956 models. AMC had talked with Packard in the late 40s about possible merger. AMC officials still hoped this would happen and felt a cooperative venture would strengthen bonds between the two companies and pave the way. AMC and Packard agreed to use each other as parts suppliers -- or so AMC thought. In reality Packard president James Nance felt he was doing AMC a favor by selling them engines and felt no obligation to purchase from them (Packard was still a healthy company in 1955). A few bids were sent over to AMC, but were rejected as being to high or taking to long to fill. This took place early in the hand-shake agreement.

Nance's attitude incensed AMC president George Romney so much that he ordered his engineers to develop a V-8 engine as soon as possible (the hand-shake agreement was meant to foment trust between the two companies -- we see how that worked!). In order to do this AMC hired former Kaiser engineer Dave Potter. He had already worked on V-8 designs at Kaiser in cooperation with Continental, Kaiser's engine supplier. This prior experience enabled him to have an AMC built engine ready for installation in a vehicle in less than 18 months!

In order to meet the short development time the engine couldn't be cutting edge technology. Potter used all proven design and build techniques. It was on a par with other V-8s of the time, with the exception of the then new, cutting edge Chevrolet small block (also introduced in 1955). In other words the engine was relatively bulky and heavy for its displacement (originally 250 cubic inches, increased to 327 in 1956), but very strong. There wasn't time to build and test cast connecting rods and crankshafts, so forged parts were used. With the bulk of the block and forged crank and rods, this proved to be an exceptionally strong engine. Today a few racers have discovered this and are using them for high boost turbocharging. The only thing required is custom forged pistons -- the crank and rods are as strong or stronger than aftermarket performance parts after a little preparation.

The only drawback to the design was the heads. The spark plug was located vertically in line with the bore on a "shelf" below the valve cover. This created a nice wedge shaped combustion chamber, but severly limited valve size. The valves could only be so big before shrouding (valve head so close to the cylinder wall that little air can flow around the part closest to the wall) affected flow. The block was capable of supporting over 400 cubic inches, but the heads would need to be redesigned to adequately support large enough valves. Only slightly larger valves can be installed in these heads, and the slight gain may not be worth the cost. The turbo racers mentioned earlier overcome valve size somewhat with boost -- up to 23 psi -- but limit displacement to near stock, only boring to take out wear.

This engine is often confused with the Chevrolet 327, but Chevy didn't make their small block 327 until 1962. Obviously the confusion arises before anyone has actually looked at the engine. The early AMC V-8 more closely resembles the Chevrolet 396 big block, at least in bulk. The GEN-1 is as close to a "big block" as AMC ever made.

The bore size of GEN-1 engines is cast into the left rear of the block. This is covered by the bell housing when engine is in a vehicle with transmission installed. The only other way to determine actual size is to remove a head and measure the bore, since all GEN-1 engines share the same stroke. There is a tag located on the generator bracket with the engine code on it, but this could have been changed. See "Engine Serial Numbers" for decoding the engine tag.

AMC engineers knew that the heavy V-8 couldn't compete with more modern small blocks introduced by the competition (Chevy and Chrysler in 55, Ford in 63). The heavy engines weren't in line with AMC's economy image either, though they were very much responsible for the Rambler's reliability and smoothness reputations. Development on a new V-8 started shortly after the first was in full production. The new engine, introduced in mid 1966, shared some features of modern small blocks and others more common with big block of the era. It had wide bore centers comparable to a big block. This made the block a little longer but provided plenty of room for future growth and increased stability. For these reason some publications called it a "mid block". It had a Buick style oil pump made into the timing cover. The distributor was driven off the camshaft via a gear that bolts to the front of the cam. The oil pump drive shaft was slotted to fit a tang on the end of the distributor shaft. The first GEN-2 displaced 290 cubic inches. A 343 cubic inch model joined the 290 for the 1967 model year, ousting the GEN-1 (which was used by Kaiser Jeep through mid 1968).

A 390 cubic inch performance model was introduced for the 1968 AMX. This used the same external dimensions as the 290 and 343, but had thicker main bearing webs for added stiffness in that area. AMC never produced a factory four bolt main bearing engine as they felt the two bolt cap was adequate, but they did cast the webs thick enough to be drilled for aftermarket four bolt main caps for racing purposes.

To keep high reliability with the longer stroke all 390 and larger AMC engines used forged crankshafts and rods. According to AMC engineers forgings were originally used due to inadequate time to test cast parts. AMC decided to keep the forgings, either due to low production of the engines or to retain high reliability. In either case an AMC 390/401 is much stronger than comparable small block 400 engines. No aftermarket
cranks or rods are required for racing, just careful preparation of the stock parts. This greatly reduces the cost of building a high rpm race engine, as the crank and rods of the competition must be replaced to run reliably over 7000 rpm.

The GEN-3 engine was created in 1970 when the deck height of the GEN-2 block was increased by 0.16" for that much longer stroke. This changed the 290 to a 304, and the 343 to 360. The 390 had built such a performance reputation that a new rod was made to keep a 390 for 1970. The stroke was changed only 0.11" for the 390 to bring displacement to 401 cubic inches for 1971. It was felt that more than 400 inches would be larger than needed. Even then the block had to be notched at the bottom of the bores to clear the crankshaft counterweights. The higher deck height meant a slightly wider intake was necessary.

The heads were also changed in 1970. 1966-1969 heads have rectangular exhaust ports. 1970 and later heads have a "dog leg" or "pork chop" shaped exhaust port. The larger port increased exhaust flow by around 30%, making AMC heads the best flowing production heads available. For this reason the Chrysler "Magnum" heaV-8d was based on the AMC design. The new ports also required new exhaust manifolds.

GEN-3 engines also use 1/2" head bolts -- GEN-2 V-8s use 7/16" head bolts. Heads will interchange between the two as long as the difference in bolt size is accounted for. Step dowels are made to fit the better flowing GEN-3 heads on GEN-2 blocks, but for racing purposes it is better to drill and tap the older block for 1/2" head bolts. Drilling and tapping just two of the head bolt holes, one on each end of the head, will accomplish the same purpose as the step dowels -- properly aligning the head over the block. To put GEN-2 heads on a GEN-3 block the bolt holes must be reamed to fit 1/2" bolts.

Technically AMC didn't build a small block or big block, they just made one V-8 engine with the exception of the short overlap in 1966. In reality the engines are compared with the competition. With this in mind the GEN-1 can be considered a "big block" because of its external dimensions and weight, and the GEN-2 and GEN-3 small blocks for the same reasons. Some publications have mistakenly called the 390 and 401 "big blocks" because of the displacements. Externally all GEN-2 and GEN-3 engines are the same size with the exception of a slight difference in height and width. All bolt patterns and external bolt on parts (except intake and exhaust manifolds) are identical. All internal parts interchange, though crankshaft and rod swaps may require custom pistons. GEN-1 parts are unique to that engine.

There is a myth perpetuated by several magazine articles in the early 90s about the seemingly magic "319" heads for GEN-3 engines. The articles reported that these hard to find heads (only 18 months or less in production!) were "the best" AMC heads. This was infered from information supplied by engine builders, but is not exactly the truth.

The casting number for these heads is 3196291, hence the "319" designation. Later head casting numbers start with "321" or some other number. The "319" heads use 50.60cc combustion chambers (commonly rounded to 51cc) for 10:1 compression on the 360/390/401. 1970-early 71 304 heads use a different casting number (3199517) but are essentially the same as the 360/390/401 heads. Ports may be slightly smaller and castings a bit thinner, but according to all AMC technical data 2.02"/1.62" valves can be installed. Valves of that size are not recommended for 290/304 engines as the small bore causes valve shrouding problems, negating any possible power gain. But the large valves make the heads perfect for the larger engines. Combustion chamber volume for the 1970-early 71 304 head is 52.20cc and produced a compression ratio of 9.0:1 on the 304 with stock pistons.

In mid 1971 AMC, like all other US auto makers, dropped compression to no more than 9.5:1 (8.0-8.5:1 on average). AMC did this by using a 57.92cc combustion chamber (commonly rounded to 58cc) and adjusting the recesses in the tops of pistons. Later 304 heads have a 58.92cc chamber and produce 8.4:1 compression. Because of the magazine articles the 1970-early 71 only 50.60cc heads have become increasingly pricey. They are also unneeded unless one is restoring a 1970 vehicle and wants/needs everything factory correct.

All 1970 and later AMC heads use the same port design. All 360, 390, and 401 heads are identical. These use 2.025" intake and 1.680" exhaust valves (early 70 used a 1.625" exhaust valve) and have the high flow "dog leg" exhaust ports. If building an AMC race engine simply order pistons for the desired compression ratio for the year heads that are present and forget the smaller chamber heads -- it won't cost any more (maybe less!) if the pistons need replacing anyway.

The cubic inch size of all GEN-2 and GEN-3 engines is cast into each side of the block just behind the engine mount plates in the center of the engine. An exception is the 1970 thick cast 360 which was used in some Donohue Javelins to homologate the thick wall 360 block for Trans-Am racing. These were also used as service replacement engines. They are essentially a 401 casting (they have the same casting number as the 401) with a 360 bore. This block could be bored to 360 or 401 specs, hence its use as a service replacement, and why it didn't have to be used in all the 1970 Donohue Javelins. Homologation wasn't required because it was a standard service part, not a race only item.

The Engine Day Build Code or serial number is located on a tag riveted to the front of the right valve cover. If the tag is missing, check the rear of the left cover -- the valve covers will fit either side when reversed. See "Engine Serial Numbers" for decoding the engine tag.

Since the tag is removeable, the only reliable way to identify engine size is to see or feel the raised numbers cast into the side. The only other way is to check the stroke. This can be done by taking a head off or by using a stiff wire in a spark plug hole. Insert the wire and turn the engine by hand until the piston is at the bottom of the stroke. Now mark the wire where it exits the spark plug hole. Turn the engine by hand until the piston is at the top of the stroke and again mark the wire. Measure the distance between marks for a rough measurement of the stroke. This measurement won't be exact, but should be close enough to determine actual engine size procided it is a factory built engine. Crankshafts, rods, and pistons can be mixed and matched for other than factory combinations.



AMC V-8 Engine Chart (1954-1991)
NOTE: pre 1972 hp figures are GROSS HP , 1972 and later are NET HP .
There are no significant changes between 1971 and 1972 engines.
Size: CID (Liters)
Bore x Stroke (inches)
Years Used, Specifications
Notes
250 (4.1L), 3.5 x 3.25
1956-57, 190 hp @ 4900 rpm, 240 ft/lb @ 2500 rpm, 2V, 8.0:1
1956 Ambassador & Hornet Special, 1957 Rambler V-8
1958-61, 200 hp @ 4900 rpm, 245 ft/lb @ 2500 rpm, 2V, 8.7:1
1958-61, 215 hp @ 4900 rpm, 260 ft/lb @ 2500 rpm, 4V, 8.7:1
w/ dual exhaust, standard
287 (4.7L), 3.75 x 3.25
1963-66, 198 hp @ 4700 rpm, 280 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 2V, 8.7:1
Classic only
290 (4.8L), 3.75 x 3.28
1966-69, 200 hp @ 4600 rpm, 285 ft/lb @ 2800 rpm, 2V, 9.0:1
1966-69, 225 hp @ 4700 rpm, 300 ft/lb @ 3200 rpm, 2V, 10.0:1
304 (5.0L), 3.75 x 3.44
1970-71, 210 hp @ 4400 rpm, 305 ft/lb @ 2800 rpm, 2V, 9.0:1
1972-74, 150 hp @ 4400 rpm, 245 ft/lb @ 2500 rpm, 2V, 8.4:1
1975-79, 120 hp @ 3200 rpm, 220 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 2V, 8.4:1
320 (5.2L), 3.81 x 3.5
1955, 208 hp @ 4200 rpm, 300 ft/lb @ 2000 rpm, 2V, 8.25:1
Purchased from Packard, Nash Ambassador & Hudson Hornet only
327 (5.4L), 4.0 x 3.25
1956, 210 hp @ 4400 rpm, 305 ft/lb @ 2800 rpm, 2V, 9.0:1
Nash Ambassador and Hudson Hornet only
1957, 288 hp @ 4700 rpm, 350 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, EFI, 9.5:1
Only used in the special edition Rebel, w/dual exhaust, rpm estimated
Bendix "Electrojector" EFI, few made, none exist today
1957, 255 hp @ 4700 rpm, 345 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 4V, 9.5:1
Only used in the special edition Rebel, w/dual exhaust
1958-1966, 270 hp @ 4700 rpm, 360 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 4V, 9.7:1
60-64 Ambassador only, w/dual exhaust
1960-1966, 250 hp @ 4700 rpm, 340 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 2V, 8.7:1
60-64 Ambassador only, single exhaust
352 (5.8L), 4.0 x 3.5
1956, 220 hp @ 4800 rpm, 320 ft/lb @ 2200 rpm, 2V, 9.55:1
Purchased from Packard, Nash Ambassador & Hudson Hornet only
343 (5.6L), 4.08 x 3.28
1967-69, 235 hp @ 4400 rpm, 345 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 2V, 9.0:1
1967-69, 280 hp @ 4800 rpm, 365 ft/lb @ 3000 rpm, 4V, 10.2:1
w/dual exhaust
360 (5.9L), 4.08 x 3.44
1970-71, 245 hp @ 4400 rpm, 365 ft/lb @ 2400 rpm, 2V, 8.5:1
1970-71, 290 hp @ 4800 rpm, 395 ft/lb @ 3200 rpm, 4V, 10.0:1
1972-74, 175 hp @ 4400 rpm, 285 ft/lb @ 2400 rpm, 2V, 8.5:1
1972-73, 195 hp @ 4400 rpm, 295 ft/lb @ 2900 rpm, 4V, 8.5:1
1974, 220 hp @ 4400 rpm, 315 ft/lb @ 3100 rpm, 4V, 8.5:1
w/dual exhaust
1975-78, 140 hp @ 3300 rpm, 251 ft/lb @ 1600 rpm, 2V, 8.25:1
1975-76, 180 hp @ 3600 rpm, 280 ft/lb @ 2800 rpm, 4V, 8.25:1
1977-91, 155 hp @ 3200 rpm, 280 ft/lb @ 1500 rpm, 2V, 8.25:1
Jeep only
390 (6.4L), 4.17 x 3.57
1968-69, 315 hp @ 4600 rpm, 430 ft/lb @ 3200 rpm, 4V, 10.2:1
1970, 325 hp @ 5000 rpm, 420 ft/lb @ 3200 rpm, 4V, 10.0:1
1970, 340 hp @ 5100 rpm, 430 ft/lb @ 3600 rpm, 4V, 10.0:1
Rebel Machine only
401 (6.6L), 4.17 x 3.68
1971, 330 hp @ 5000 rpm, 430 ft/lb @ 3400 rpm, 4V, 9.5:1
1972-75, 255 hp @ 4600 rpm, 335 ft/lb @ 3200 rpm, 4V, 8.5:1
police only in 1975
1972-75, 315 hp @ 3100 rpm, 280 ft/lb @ 1500 rpm, 2V, 8.5:1
w/dual exhaust, police only in 1975
1973-74, 225 hp @ 4600 rpm, 330 ft/lb @ 2600 rpm, 2V, 8.5:1
International Pickup and Travelall only, rpm and torque estimated

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A word about Horsepower Ratings
There are two different standardized methods for rating horsepower used by the auto industry. Both methods rate the maximum horsepower developed off the crankshaft of the engine with an engine dynomometer. Neither takes into account losses from torque converters, transmissions, or rear axles -- that takes a chassis dynomometer.

The first is GROSS horsepower, used prior to 1972. This method is the most liberal, and also the most unrealistic. The engine is connected to the dyno, but nothing is connected to the engine. There is no air filter or breather (dyno is in a clean room), no exhaust system, and no belt driven accessories -- not even a water pump (coolant is circulated via an external pump). Some type of header is used to carry away the exhaust and supply minimal back pressure (some back pressure is required), but that's all. No wonder those sixties muscle cars put out so much power!

Engineers realized that the horsepower numbers generated by the gross method really meant nothing. In 1972 automotive engineers adopted the NET horsepower rating method. This required an engine to have the factory installed air breather, all standard belt driven accessories, factory exhaust manifolds, and an exhaust system simulating the factory system -- mufflers and all. This gives more realistic numbers, but still doesn't account for drivetrain losses.

There are so many different combinations of drivetrains that it would be impractical to rate engines with all combinations. Even a change in tire size can affect power output on a chassis dynomometer. All dynomometers vary somewhat in accuracy among manufacturers and types, but the chassis dynomometer is also greatly influenced by outside forces such as weather. Engine dynomometers are in controlled environments and therefore more accurate.

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******** END OF PAGE ********
All this was gleamed from dead sites.
Sorry for the long post but to many times someone will post a link and in a
year or maybe sooner the site is doa, mia and the information lost.
So I'm just trying to help my fellow Jeepers.

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Unread 05-01-2013, 01:31 PM   #2
Stephen84
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Can someone please decode this number 811CL110
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Unread 05-01-2013, 01:49 PM   #3
jeepwhore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen84 View Post
Can someone please decode this number 811CL110
Seems like you have one too many characters in there.

If the "811C" part is correct it's a 4.2L built in November of 1988. The engine type code for engines available in 1975 (if the "8" stood for that) don't include "C" (the 4.2L) so the next available year for "8" would be 1988.

I deciphered my rebuilt short block to be an '88 engine, code 803CX25, but I haven't found anything that suggests what the second letter means. The "X", or in your case "L", seems to be a mystery. But from what I can see your engine was built on either the 10th or 11th day of November in 1988.
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Unread 05-01-2013, 01:50 PM   #4
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where did you pull this number from?
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Unread 05-01-2013, 08:45 PM   #5
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There's a machined pad on the engine block (six cylinders) just above and ahead of the distributor. This will be stamped with the code.
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Unread 05-02-2013, 03:57 PM   #6
Stephen84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepwhore View Post
Seems like you have one too many characters in there.

If the "811C" part is correct it's a 4.2L built in November of 1988. The engine type code for engines available in 1975 (if the "8" stood for that) don't include "C" (the 4.2L) so the next available year for "8" would be 1988.

I deciphered my rebuilt short block to be an '88 engine, code 803CX25, but I haven't found anything that suggests what the second letter means. The "X", or in your case "L", seems to be a mystery. But from what I can see your engine was built on either the 10th or 11th day of November in 1988.
I thought I had too many numbers so I took a piece of paper and traced over with a pencil to get the exact stamp and that was it but mine has a plastic valve cover and a aluminum intake I would just like to know what exactly I had in it you know
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Unread 05-15-2013, 06:08 PM   #7
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Not to drag up and old thread, but a "106E22" could be a '68 or '77 232 built on June 22nd? Are the numbers supposed to line up? This is what I got from my 75 CJ5 that's supposed to have a 258.

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Unread 05-15-2013, 06:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dagr8tim
Not to drag up and old thread, but a "106E22" could be a '68 or '77 232 built on June 22nd? Are the numbers supposed to line up? This is what I got from my 75 CJ5 that's supposed to have a 258.
Since the "E" code 232 was only available from '70-'79 I'd say it was built June 22 of '77. The code on a 258 in a 75 would start with either 7 or 8 and the letter code would be A or B.....depending on when the jeep was assembled (ie. the first 75's could have had an engine built in 74). Looks like someone swapped engines at some point.
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Unread 05-15-2013, 07:14 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepwhore View Post
Since the "E" code 232 was only available from '70-'79 I'd say it was built June 22 of '77. The code on a 258 in a 75 would start with either 7 or 8 and the letter code would be A or B.....depending on when the jeep was assembled (ie. the first 75's could have had an engine built in 74). Looks like someone swapped engines at some point.
Casting number on the block is 3227445, so I figured it was a 77.

I don't mind that it's not the original engine, but I'm alittle sad that it's a 232.
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Unread 05-16-2013, 08:20 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by dagr8tim View Post
I'm a little sad that it's a 232.
If you hadn't decoded it would you have ever known the difference? The HP and torque difference between the 232 and 258 is insignificant and I doubt 99% of the seat of the pants dynos would ever be able to tell the difference. Drive it, enjoy it and don't worry that it has 26 fewer cubic inches.
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Unread 05-16-2013, 08:23 AM   #11
dagr8tim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pathkiller View Post
If you hadn't decoded it would you have ever known the difference? The HP and torque difference between the 232 and 258 is insignificant and I doubt 99% of the seat of the pants dynos would ever be able to tell the difference. Drive it, enjoy it and don't worry that it has 26 fewer cubic inches.
This is a barn find that hasn't ran in years. Looking at all the work to properly go through an old engine and get it running after sitting for a long time. It may be cheaper to find a running 258.

I'm waiting to hear back about on on CL right now.
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Jeeping - The art of getting dirty & going broke while slowly heading nowhere, and taking all day to do it.

97 XJ SE - DD/Light Trail Rig - The War Wagon
75 CJ5 with a badly chopped CJ7 Tub - Pandora
96 Land Rover Discovery - Black Dog; possible trail toy
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Unread 05-16-2013, 09:43 AM   #12
Pathkiller
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1974 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Lorton, VA
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Never know. Before I even considered an engine swap I'd give the old gal a shot and see if it runs. Squirt a little Marvel Mystery oil into the cylinders, throw on some fresh spark plugs, run a gas line from a clean gas can to the carb and see if it will fire.
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74 CJ5 complete frame off restoration
82 CJ8 Scrambler Laredo. 4.6L stroker AX15 D300.
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Unread 05-16-2013, 09:50 AM   #13
dagr8tim
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1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Galloway, Oh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pathkiller View Post
Never know. Before I even considered an engine swap I'd give the old gal a shot and see if it runs. Squirt a little Marvel Mystery oil into the cylinders, throw on some fresh spark plugs, run a gas line from a clean gas can to the carb and see if it will fire.
I can turn it over by hand. I'm working my way down from the battery, to the solenoid, to the starter to verify that all works. Then a spark test.

Once those things are taken care of, I'll dig into the carb and try to fire it.
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Jeeping - The art of getting dirty & going broke while slowly heading nowhere, and taking all day to do it.

97 XJ SE - DD/Light Trail Rig - The War Wagon
75 CJ5 with a badly chopped CJ7 Tub - Pandora
96 Land Rover Discovery - Black Dog; possible trail toy
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Unread 05-21-2013, 01:09 PM   #14
BadHabit80cj7
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1980 CJ7 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Terrebonne (Central Oregon), Oregon
Posts: 25
Good to know....just found out my 80 cj7 has a 1973 258 610 A 01
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Unread 12-18-2013, 06:53 AM   #15
frustratedinnb
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I have a 1982 cj7 and is supposed to be a 4.2L inline 6, but the oil filter size and number is for a 1978 L6 3.8L Vin E the number I got off of the engine block is 205C18 which engine does this number belong to?
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