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Unread 02-27-2009, 08:10 PM   #61
Coiz
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1979 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Northern, IL
Posts: 4,165
I wasn't going to post this but decided to anyway since periodic cleaning is part of the rebuild project. We had finally got a decent weekend in the north a couple weekends ago so I decided it was time for a long overdue garage cleaning. The floor was so bad I couldn't walk the three steps to the kegerator without tracking in black footprints on my way back into the house. I threw away a lot of old parts, boxes, cardboard, scrap metal shavings and just trash in general. I wiped down and put away all of my tools. Thanks to my POS HOA I can't store my trailer behind the garage anymore so I'm forced to keep it in the garage. I had it back there for almost two years with no issues but a newly elected HOA member went on a power trip warning everybody about everything. So instead of the trailer nicely hidden behind the garage, now that's where I have my roll cage, exhaust and old front fenders. I've never gotten a warning about that stuff. My neighbor is cool and doesn't care, it's just one member of the HOA on a power trip. So I use the trailer as an extra work bench and to store the rest of the chassis parts and large cardboard that is still usable. Checkout the new company ride I just picked up.


The garage in complete disarray.



I pressure washed the entire floor and it changed three shades of grey. I wasn't shy about dumping some Mr.Clean down and scrubbed it in with my broom. After that I let it soak for 15 minutes then I pressure washed it again. This is the cleanest my garage has been since I started this project twelve months ago.


All of the POR has stained the epoxy floor but it really doesn’t bother me. I am going to be painting the Jeep in the garage so the floor is going to get hit again. I'll probably refinish the garage floor in another 2-3 years anyway.

Once I start in on the bodywork, everything will be covered in grinding or bondo dust anyway. I need to pick up some more cheap drop clothes from HF so I can cover everything up to help keep the dust off. I got some more work done on the jeep I will be posting shortly.

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1979 CJ7, FI 5.0L Ford, NP435, D300, Full floated D44 Detroit, D30 Detroit EZ Locker.

Last edited by Coiz; 02-27-2009 at 11:07 PM..
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Unread 02-27-2009, 09:57 PM   #62
JeepnBlake
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2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Lincoln Nebraska
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great build/resto

always great to see another jeeper who enjoys a nice sport bike... (The suzuki that is lol jk i'm just partial to suzuki's as i have a 93 750)
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Unread 02-27-2009, 10:11 PM   #63
Coiz
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1979 CJ7 
 
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^^^ Thanks, I like the Suzuki too as you can see by my leathers. I had several R1's as street bikes before racing and loved those too.


After reading a thread by JeepHammer about installing some grease zerks in the hubs to help pack them completely full of grease to help keep out water, I started my search to find some flush mount zerks. I wanted the flush mounts so they wouldn’t be sticking out of the hub and potentially be damaged while installing/removing the wheels or by anything else while wheeling for that matter. It took me awhile but I was finally able to track down exactly what I was looking for. I wanted to make sure I drilled the hubs at the correct 45-degree angle and make sure I didn’t hit the inner bearing race. I zeroed my angle master on the workbench and as you can see, with the hub resting on it’s own with the inward side on the table, it measures exactly 45 degrees. Now I know all I have to do is use the bubble on the end of my drill and hold it steady for the correct angle. I wish I had a drill press.


I drilled a 5/64” pilot hole right at the middle of the concave bend on the hub. I stepped that up with a 7/64” then finally a 9/64” to prep for the tap. Here you can see where the hole easily clears both of the bearing races in the center of the hub.


I used a M5x.8 tap to make the threads for the flush mount zerk.


Here you can see how the zerk easily fits inside the wheel-mounting surface so there are no worries with damaging the zerk or fighting with it to get the wheel on or off.


Gave it a shot of grease to make sure it works correctly.




Three of the bearings looked good while one had some rough spots on the race. Here you can see me holding the bad race with the new one already installed below it.


Everyone knows you can’t just smear the bearings with grease, right? They must be packed!


I torqued the inner nut to 50 ft/lbs while rotating the hub assembly, backed it off a ¼ turn, then made it finger tight. Next I installed the safety washer and torqued the outer nut to 65 ft/lbs. Then you fold the washer over the nut so it can’t back itself off. I changed the grease in my gun to match what I packed the bearings with and topped off the hubs.


Then I finished installing the rest of the brakes and my brand new Warn Premium hubs.


Are all of those shiny new brake parts sweet or what?

I’m now back to a rolling chassis so I can put the tires back on and move it around if I wish. I was also working on installing the brake lines off and on while I was waiting on some of my hub parts.

I am also waiting on my tie rod flip inserts to show up so I can move the steering rods to the tops of the knuckles. You can see how close the rod is to the top of the springs and they are not parallel even with the drop pitman arm. It looks like they will be really close to parallel once they are moved to the top of the knuckles.
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1979 CJ7, FI 5.0L Ford, NP435, D300, Full floated D44 Detroit, D30 Detroit EZ Locker.

Last edited by Coiz; 02-27-2009 at 11:08 PM..
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Unread 03-09-2009, 11:27 AM   #64
Exposed
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1981 CJ5 
 
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Looking Great...

I just followed your build and see many things similar from frame to the motor on mine... I got my frame painted this weekend and will try to post pictures soon. Also got the 331 stroker motor 95% complete.... What headers did you use?? Are those the F-150 truck shortie headers???? I know that is what Hack told me he used. I have a set of shorties off 88 GT but they dump in the rear and I don't think there will be enough frame clearance....
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Unread 03-09-2009, 12:47 PM   #65
Coiz
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I couldn't use the GT headers for the same reason you listed. If I remember correctly I think they tried to dump right in the middle of my clutch linkage. The headers I have are from Advanced Adapters for the 5.0L conversion. You can see they are the flat flange while I believe the F150 shorties have the doughnut style outlet. I think the doughnut style are less likely to leak. That said, I bought some of those 6 ply aluminum gaskets and locking header bolts to try to keep the exhaust leaks away.

I got my tie rod flip done and the transfer case back together. I'll post an update when I get the chance.
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Unread 05-09-2009, 09:22 PM   #66
Coiz
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Dana 300

My Dana 300 had a front pinion seal leak and a few other weeps so I gave it a complete gasket and seal kit. Here it is before I started.


I gave it a good once over with a wire wheel and a quick scrub with marine clean.


I pulled the cover off and all of the gears looked great.


These are all the parts you can remove without any special tools. Don’t mind the 2-row grain dust; I rebuilt this in my utility/brew room.

All of the bearing races pretty much looked like this one. No need to replace any of the bearings.


Here is why my front yoke was leaking., pitting on the seal surface of the yoke itself.


I checked the front output shaft endplay and found that it was excessive. Endplay measured .010” while spec is .003-.006. My bearing retainer shims measured .042” so I removed one of them to get .037” which gave me a final shaft endplay of .005”, right in specifications.


I greased up the intermediate shaft bearings so they would stay in place and installed 2 new thrust bushings.


Here I got it all sealed up with new gaskets, seals and RTV.


Here it is painted with 2 coats of POR-15 and 2 coats of Blackcote ready to install back into the Jeep.
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Last edited by Coiz; 05-10-2009 at 11:43 AM..
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Unread 05-09-2009, 11:01 PM   #67
Coiz
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Tie Rod Flip

I noticed how close my steering rods were to my front leaf springs so I decided to go with a simple yet effective Go-Fer-It Tie-Rod flip to move the steering arms to the tops of the knuckles. Here you can see how they looked under the knuckles with a 4” suspension lift and .5” shackle lift. You can see how close the rod is to the top of the springs and the angle of the two arms is not even close to parallel, which is what you want. This is with the drop pitman arm that came with the suspension lift.


I bought the $20 drill bit and drilled out the holes per the instructions.


Here is the driver’s side all drilled out and ready to be welded in.


Here is the passenger’s side.


I fully welded them on the top and bottom then ground them down just to clean them up a bit.


I touched them up with a little POR and installed the steering arms after they dried. Check out how much room there is between the springs and the arms. Notice I also got my steering brace installed. The rusty looking surface rust is just a layer of dust that will come off with a good cleaning.


Notice how parallel the steering arms are compared to the first photo.


Now I can actually get the steering rods and my front diff cover off on the trail, if I ever needed to, much easier than I could have before the tie-rod flip.


I also got the drive shafts and sway bar cleaned up and painted at the same time.



Next up should be the roll bar frame tie-ins and the roll bar itself.
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1979 CJ7, FI 5.0L Ford, NP435, D300, Full floated D44 Detroit, D30 Detroit EZ Locker.

Last edited by Coiz; 05-10-2009 at 11:43 AM..
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Unread 05-10-2009, 12:00 PM   #68
Coiz
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Roll Bar Tie-ins

The Jeep had a 6-point sport cage in it when I bought it but it was just the standard bolt to the floor design. I decided to buy the MORE roll bar tie-in kit for the front. Once I got the tub back on the frame I was able to get the roll bar mounted so I could bolt up the mounts and tack them in place.


Once I got the front tie-ins tacked on I really started looking at the way the stock bar mounts to the tub right behind the seats. It is bolted to a body channel, which is right above a body mount, and should be pretty strong I but figured this was the time to beef it up a little. I was checking out Fatman’s cage thread and decided to tweak that idea a little bit. I started off with a 3”x 13”x1/8” plate to pinch the tub metal with the roll bar. It extends from the end of the roll bar all the way to the seat belt mounts so they are effectively tied-in as well. Next I welded on a 3/16” thick piece 6.5” long to match the mount on the roll bar. This was mainly just to take up space but obviously makes the part much stronger.


From there I started working on the main frame design. I used a ½” thick piece of horse stable rubber matting you can get at a Farm & Fleet as an insulating material. It‘s very dense rubber matting made from recycled rubber and should hold up very well. My friend uses strips of this stuff as the replaceable blade on his tractor’s snowplow. So I started with a piece of 3” x 6.5”x 3/16” steel. Next I welded on a piece of 1.5”x 3/16” angle to the upper half of the plate and drilled the 4 holes. This gave me a great shelf support design for the legs to the Jeep frame. Here I am holding up the 3/16” by 1.5” angle and plate to tie to the inner and outer frame rails.


Once I had it all tacked into place I decided to add another piece of angle between the two main spares to provide additional lateral support. Here is a good picture of the driver’s side ready to be clamped and welded to the frame. The two nuts on the left are the secure points for the seat belt mount.


For esthetics as well as rigidity I decided to box in the channel with another piece of 3/16” bar stock.


I debated for a while over whether or not I wanted to mess with the rear most mounting points. Every additional piece of metal I welded on seemed like more and more overkill. Well, I found a guy local selling a piece of 2” square by 54” and 3/16” thick for a good price so I decided to go with the traditional bat wings approach to support the rear mounts. A 3/16” plate is on top bolted to the roll bar with the same ½” rubber insulator between the body. Here is the driver’s side.


Of course, you have to cut out the inner fender supports to make room for the roll bar mount. Here is the passenger’s side.


After talking with Besrk about a rear bumper, I decided to weld on the MORE 3/16” rear crossmember reinforcement plate to help handle any additional load from all the crap that will be bolted to it. By crap I mean spare tire, Hi-Lift jack, gas can, ect.,.


Here they are after I got a coat or two of paint on them. I wish I could have got this done before I painted the frame with the HVLP gun.


Close up of the Driver’s side completely done. Not the prettiest things but I think it will hold up just fine.


After I was satisfied that my roll bar was sufficiently tied into the frame at all 6 points, I was looking at the roll bar itself and started scratching my chin.
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1979 CJ7, FI 5.0L Ford, NP435, D300, Full floated D44 Detroit, D30 Detroit EZ Locker.

Last edited by Coiz; 01-27-2010 at 01:37 PM..
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Unread 05-10-2009, 01:42 PM   #69
genghisman
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Are you doing a twin stick on your D300? Lookin good so far, makes me jealous that I can't do it yet.
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Unread 05-10-2009, 03:38 PM   #70
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looking really nice. great job!
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Unread 05-11-2009, 10:49 AM   #71
Coiz
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^^^ Thanks guys. I hadn't really thought much about adding a twin stick. I haven't really done any hardcore wheeling in over 10 years and at the time I was really heavy into it, none of the guys I wheeled with had or used a twin stick setup. I suppose I will read up on it and decide if it is worth it or not. If I am going to do it, now is the time. Another one of those, while I'm here I might as well..... I wish I had a nickle for every time I've said that since I started this whole project.
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Unread 05-11-2009, 11:04 AM   #72
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Really coming along nicely. Glad to see another one being saved!
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Unread 05-11-2009, 04:30 PM   #73
Coiz
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Roll Bar

^^^ Thanks.

After I had spent so much time tying in the roll bar to the frame at all 6 points I decided I might as well beef up the roll bar itself. Here is how it looked before I started. It was a standard stock cage with front sport bars and an added cross section near the lower back area.


I looked around quite a bit online but I was finally able to find a place locally that sold the DOM tubing I was looking for. I was able to get 1.75”x.120” DOM for $5 a foot. I got it from a race chassis builder called Left Hander Chassis. I started by welding in the windshield span.


Next I welded in the two main loop diagonal ‘V’ supports. Man, somebody crack a door.


My seat belts use to be secured at the top of the roll bar but I never really like it that way. The belts are three points and the shoulder section of the harness comes together like a ‘Y’ at the top. Being pulled up made the harness cut into your neck and was very uncomfortable. Not only that but if the Jeep were to roll over, the harness could potentially loosen if the bar were to collapse with the seat belt mount at the top. I read around several racing sights and found that the shoulder part of the harnesses should be straight back or even slightly downward. So I added in these cross bars to give the seat belt shoulder harness the correct angle on the passenger's shoulders. The additional bars should also add some rigidity.


I also read that you don’t want the securing part of the belt under any type of side tension. The belt mount should have a straight pull. So I took a piece of 1”x 2” square and cut it 1.5 inches long. I then took some 3/16" bar stock and welded them inside to take up some of the gap.


I then cut a 1” wide piece of angle iron and welded them to the outsides for legs. This provided more support and more welding area to the crossbar. Major overkill for a seat belt mount but oh well.


Here it is drilled out to the bolt size on the front and tapped to the bolt thread in the back. I will use a nut on the back as a locking nut. No clamping force really needed as the seat belt will be pulling straight up.


I had some tubing left over so I decided to add a couple supports to the rear arms. I zeroed my Anglemaster on the upper lip of the tub so the bars should look parallel with the body. These additional bars should really help with triangulation toward the rear.


Here is the roll bar with all the main supports welded into place. Notice I also added a cap to the where the main hoop ‘V’ bars meet at the lower back bar.


Last but not least I went back and added 2” gussets 3/16” thick to the entire inner and outer upper halo bars, windshield span and lower back bar.


Now I feel like my roll bar is actually worthy of being tied into the frame. It weighs a bit more now than before I started but should hold up much better then before in the event of a rollover. That picture kind of reminds me of the symbol for a popular band you might have heard of, Van Halen.

I sent the tub to the media blaster last Friday so I will post up some updates on the tub once I get it back. Lots of rust was cut out and quite a few places that need to be repaired. I’ve got my work cut out for me for the next couple of months.
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Unread 05-11-2009, 04:36 PM   #74
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Looks good
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Unread 05-12-2009, 11:38 PM   #75
Coiz
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Exhaust System

The exhaust looked to be in decent shape although it was quite rusty. I would love to get a full stainless system, and probably will when this one finally falls apart, but decided to save this one in an attempt to save a little bit of money on the build. Here are the Flowmasters and the back half of the system.


The mufflers are stainless but even the welds try to rust.


Here is a picture of the front half of the system.


You can see what about 10 minutes with a wire wheel can do. The exhaust on the right is the passenger’s side. You can see where the first few feet is a section of stainless where the rest is not. That’s because the first exhaust shop that built it for me put it on without the front driveshaft in place. Once I got the driveshaft back from being lengthened it was obvious it was not going to clear so I had another shop fix that section.


Once I had the entire thing wire wheeled I was just going to wash and paint. I found a 36 grit sanding disk on my shelf and decided to give it a once over with the sander. Every time I went over it the color would change from a rusty brown more toward metal. I would go over one side and think it was good then go to the next. Then I would compare the two and one would be cleaner than the other. I went back and forth three times before I decided to shut myself off and call it good. I didn’t need every single rust pit removed.


I forgot to pull off the hangers so this gives a great before and after of the difference in surface prep.


Here is a picture of the muffler after being hit with the wire wheel.


The next evening I gave them two good cleanings with a scrubby sponge and some Marine Clean. I dried them off and got ready for paint.


I used high-temp aluminum colored header/exhaust paint with ceramic coating.


I think it looks a lot better than it did before I started and well worth the 4 hours it took me to clean them up.


I found out I had bought the wrong header gaskets. I got the oval ports and I need the rectangular ports. They looked like they would work but at this point why risk it? I ordered correct ones on Sunday so hopefully I will get them by the end of the week. Once I get the gaskets I can install the headers, exhaust, starter, transfer case and driveshafts. After all of that the only thing left to install on the chassis will be the gas tank, fuel pump and lines.
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1979 CJ7, FI 5.0L Ford, NP435, D300, Full floated D44 Detroit, D30 Detroit EZ Locker.
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