Battery will not charge, need more assistance. - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > Models > Jeep CJ Forum > Battery will not charge, need more assistance.

Introducing MONSTALINER™ UV Permanent DIY Roll On Bed LineFS: Jeep Fog Light LED Bulbs! Several Brightness Options! Clayton Off Road JK Short Arm Suspension Kits

Reply
Unread 07-17-2010, 07:53 PM   #1
wingedmare
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 29 palms ca, california
Posts: 269
*UPDATE* Battery will not charge, need more assistance.

I'm about two seconds away from driving my Beloved Wyle E. over a cliff. Mostly from my frustration from lack of comprehension. The Battery WILL NOT charge. The battery charges and is new. The alternator tested good and was just replaced. I replaced the plug that goes into the alternator, the wires to that were a mess. But regardless NO GO! I am going to BEG you guys for some pictures of what my wiring SHOULD look like. Also, earlier some of you said to check my grounds. But I really don't know what I'm looking for or where as far as that goes. None of my manuals show pictures of these things or explain them. If I don't get a grasp on this soon I'm going to have to break down and just take her to a shop. I really was hoping not to have to do that, but alas, it just may have to happen.


Last edited by wingedmare; 08-05-2010 at 09:55 AM..
wingedmare is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-17-2010, 08:39 PM   #2
frank c
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: northwest arizona
Posts: 403
Well if you're willing to give it 2 seconds , just do a couple searches on this forum for like "alternator wiring" or alternator output or charging, or wiring from scratch , etc. etc.
Thats what I have done and just scan thru the posts you WILL find what you are looking for.
This forum is a living miracle for JEEP OWNERS.
frank c is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-17-2010, 08:46 PM   #3
TheGhost
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingedmare View Post
I'm about two seconds away from driving my Beloved Wyle E. over a cliff. Mostly from my frustration from lack of comprehension. The Battery WILL NOT charge. The battery charges and is new. The alternator tested good and was just replaced. I replaced the plug that goes into the alternator, the wires to that were a mess. But regardless NO GO! I am going to BEG you guys for some pictures of what my wiring SHOULD look like. Also, earlier some of you said to check my grounds. But I really don't know what I'm looking for or where as far as that goes. None of my manuals show pictures of these things or explain them. If I don't get a grasp on this soon I'm going to have to break down and just take her to a shop. I really was hoping not to have to do that, but alas, it just may have to happen.
If you are sure the battery is good and you're sure the alternator is good (you tested it off of the vehicle), my first guess would be that you don't have or you have a bad "exciter" circuit. If no excitation current reaches the alternator field windings, the alternator, due to low residual magnetism in the rotor will not generate any power.

The alternator should have a post on the back that has a larger wire from the solenoid. There should also be a 2-wire flat connector that plugs into the side of the alternator. There should be a small (possibly brown) wire from the harness that connects to the right side (if viewed from the front of the vehicle) of that connector. The wire on the other side of that connector should connect back to the post on the back of the alternator with the wire from the solenoid.

My $0.02. Good Luck!
TheGhost is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-17-2010, 09:23 PM   #4
wingedmare
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 29 palms ca, california
Posts: 269
@TheGhost; Tnx, that give me a fairly good mental picture. I really need an "idiots guide to Cj's"

@Frank C; I have been searching, but what I'm finding just isn't making sense to me. Little pieces broken down barney style are what I'm trying to find.
wingedmare is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-18-2010, 08:39 AM   #5
TheGhost
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 120
Go to http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/lo...attery-829258/ and look at JeepHammer's post #15. It will give you all the info you need.

I always look for JeepHammer posts when I'm looking for anything electrical that I can't figure out myself.

Good Luck!
TheGhost is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-18-2010, 10:21 AM   #6
frank c
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: northwest arizona
Posts: 403
Theghost, WOW what a great link when you're starting from scratch even to wire up the entire engine compartment.
frank c is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-18-2010, 10:40 AM   #7
TheGhost
Registered User
1983 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by frank c View Post
Theghost, WOW what a great link when you're starting from scratch even to wire up the entire engine compartment.
No doubt, JeepHammer (TeamRush) knows his stuff! Like I said - I always look for his posts (along with a few others) when I'm trying to diagnose a problem that has me stumped. He has a lot of these diagrams that are a big help if you want to just do-it-yourself.
TheGhost is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-19-2010, 07:40 AM   #8
JeepHammer
Running On Empty...
1973 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: South West Indiana
Posts: 10,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingedmare View Post
I'm about two seconds away from driving my Beloved Wyle E. over a cliff. Mostly from my frustration from lack of comprehension. The Battery WILL NOT charge. The battery charges and is new. The alternator tested good and was just replaced. I replaced the plug that goes into the alternator, the wires to that were a mess. But regardless NO GO! I am going to BEG you guys for some pictures of what my wiring SHOULD look like. Also, earlier some of you said to check my grounds. But I really don't know what I'm looking for or where as far as that goes. None of my manuals show pictures of these things or explain them. If I don't get a grasp on this soon I'm going to have to break down and just take her to a shop. I really was hoping not to have to do that, but alas, it just may have to happen.
OK, for the 'Newbie', we start from 'Scratch'...

'Ground'... A MISNOMER term used in automotive wiring meaning an ELECTRICAL NEGATIVE to the alternator.

There isn't actually a 'Ground' in Automotive (DC = Direct Current) wiring.
'Ground' is an AC (AC = Alternating Current, like you home uses) term,
It's short for 'Earth-Ground'.

All AC electrical current tries to get to an 'Earth Ground', the Earth is used to terminate all AC circuits (eventually).

The term 'Ground' is used anytime you return the current back to NEGATIVE terminal of the battery in a Vehicle.
It's actually a Misnomer when used with automotive wiring.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Now, if your alternator produces POSITIVE DC Current,
There MUST be a path for that circuit to complete it's path back to the battery negative to do any good at all.

A 'Ground' wire is a 10 Ga. wire from the FRAME or CASE of the alternator back to the battery negative.
Nothing more.

It simply completes the circuit for the electrical energy produced in the alternator to reach the battery without being tortured trying to get through loose bolts, rusty or painted brackets, loose or corroded electrical connections, ect.

You will find if you add a 'Ground Wire' from the alternator case to the battery negative terminal,
Your alternator will work MUCH better,
Instead of relying on 30 year old bolts, brackets, wiring, ect.

AMC/Jeep was trying to save a few pennies on each vehicle, so they didn't give the alternator a dedicated ground wire to complete the circuit,
If you add that wire yourself, from the alternator case to the battery Negative terminal, you will have a MUCH more efficient charging system when it's working properly.

----------------------------------------------

Now, for the wiring TO your alternator...

There are some things your alternator NEEDS to work correctly...

#1 terminal NEEDS to have an 'Excite' connection.
The #1 terminal (Small wire in the two wire plug) NEEDS to have current when the vehicle starts.

This 'Excites' the alternator so it can start charging.

Once you 'Excite' the alternator, it will start making electrical current by it's self, but it needs that initial 'Shot' of current to get started.

#1 wire should be 'Hot' when the ignition switch is in the 'Run' position,
It should be 'Cold' or 'Off' when the key switch is 'Off'.

------------------------------------------------

#2 Terminal, or the larger, usually 'Red' wire in the two wire plug is the 'Sample' or 'Sense' wire.
This wire delivers a sample of the output voltage to the voltage regulator so you don't over charge or under charge.

This wire is usually looped around to the back of the alternator sampling from the 'BAT' or 'Battery' terminal on the back of the alternator.

Without this 'Sample' or 'Sense' wire connected to 'Battery' or 'Line' voltage,
The alternator will 'Fail Safe', meaning it won't overcharge and blow up the battery.

If this #2 wire isn't hooked up or getting good connection,
The system simply shuts down and you don't get a charge from the alternator.

---------------------------------------------

The Third connection is the heavy wire on the back of the case,
And it's marked 'BAT' or 'Battery'.

That wire is usually 10 Ga. (Heavy) and goes back to the starter relay ('Solenoid').
It will hook up to the battery cable side of the starter relay so it can deliver it's charge to the main battery cable and charge the battery.

---------------------------------------------

The last piece of the puzzle you need is a 'Fusible Link'.
A Fusible Link is a type of fuse made like a piece of wire,
Specifically made to burn through and open the circuit if something happens to the 'BAT' to Starter Relay wire.

If that heavy wire gets pinched, rubs through on a sharp edge, gets melted against the exhaust, ect.
Then it will heat up and burn the insulation.

That burning insulation can START A FIRE!

So, there is a 'Fusible Link' (Type of Fuse) on the first 5" to 8" of wire from the battery cable connection on the starter relay.

The battery cable relay will have TWO 10 Ga. size wires on the terminal with the battery cable.
One of those 10 Ga. size wires is the FUSIBLE LINK for the first 5" to 8",
Then it will connect to the 10 Ga. wire going to the alternator 'BAT' terminal.

It's there to protect the wire going to the alternator.

(And the second one is the wire feeding your fuse block, and the fusible link is there to protect it on it's way to the fuse block.)

The reason you don't hook the 'BAT' wire directly to the battery is, again, SAFETY.
A burned through, rubbed through 10 Ga. wire will burn the vehicle down,
So you add a 'Fusible Link' to keep that from happening...

BUT!
You can't hook that fusible link directly to the battery or *IF* the fusible link burns to save starting a fire,
It could blow up the battery!

Batteries produce a fairly large amount of Hydrogen Gas when they charge or discharge (Anytime you are running the vehicle the battery is doing one or the other),
And if the fusible link were connected directly to the battery,
And you had a problem with the 10 Ga. wire to the alternator,
The fusible link would save the vehicle from fire,
But it might set off the gases from the battery....

SO!
You simply move the fusible link to the starter relay on the fender, connect to the battery positive cable, and you have the safety of a 'Fuse' and keep it away from the dangers of the battery.

-----------------------------------------------------

Now,
If you KNOW you have (DO THE TESTING!)...

You have a 'GOOD' alternator, then it's time to test some wiring...

(And take it to more than one of the 'Discount' stores for testing,
Many of the Counter Monkeys' Don't have a clue how to test the unit correctly, so get a consensus from three or four of the discount stores...
Testing is FREE, and don't rely on just ONE opinion from a guy that couldn't make assistant manager at McDonalds...)

Ignition power at #1 wire when the Ignition Switch is 'On',
And you DO NOT have power at #1 wire when the ignition switch is 'OFF'...

If you KNOW you have the #2 wire looped around to the 'BAT' terminal on the back of the alternator,

If you KNOW you have good current through the heavy 10 Ga. wire connecting to the 'BAT' terminal,

Then you have a 'Ground' or Negative Current Path problem back to the battery.

If you DO NOT have good current to the 'BAT' terminal,
Then you probably have a $5 blown fusible link at the starter relay connection with the battery cable terminal.

FUSIBLE LINK REPLACEMENT,



-------------------------------------------

DIAGRAM SHOWING ALL COMPONENTS OF YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM.



-------------------------------------------

ALTERNATOR RESISTOR.

Now, since your alternator 'Excite' (#1 Terminal) Is connected directly to your ignition circuit to power it 'On' and 'Off' with the key switch,
Your ALTERNATOR can 'Back Feed' the ignition when you turn the key off.

This means the engine WILL NOT turn 'OFF' right away, or sometimes at all, when you turn the key switch off AFTER YOU REPLACE THE PLUG AT THE ALTERNATOR.

The 'Factory' plug had a stiff, 'Black' or 'Brown' wire connecting to the 'Excite' terminal.
This piece of wire is a specialty item, and it's an ELECTRICAL RESISTOR.

It's purpose was to 'Choke' the back feed current down so it didn't back feed the ignition.

This is EASILY FIXED if you encounter the problem.
I UPGRADE my systems with a 'Diode'.
A Diode is a one way gate valve for electricity,
It lets the current reach the alternator, but keeps that alternator current from reaching the ignition system once the alternator starts charging.

Diode part numbers shown in the diagram above, I get mine from Radio Shack for about $1.50,
And this is what a diode looks like when you replace the alternator plug...



The heat shrink tubing is there to insulate the diode once this plug is installed in the wiring harness,
You simply slip the tubing over the diode and apply heat, and the tubing will shrink up over the connection... Insulation and protection all in one step.

Clear any of this up for you?




JeepHammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-19-2010, 07:52 AM   #9
wingedmare
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 29 palms ca, california
Posts: 269
JeepHammer THANKYOU!!! YES !!! It clears up so much! Now I get it. Seriously you need to write a Jeep guide for Newbs like me. Just reading that and now I know where my educational gap was and why I'm not understanding what's happening here. I will be back to check in after making my way back through everything now that I have a clearer understanding. TNX AGAIN!!!
wingedmare is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 07-19-2010, 09:38 AM   #10
JeepHammer
Running On Empty...
1973 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: South West Indiana
Posts: 10,156
Everyone things this stuff is 'So Simple',
But it's actually Evolution of about 130 or so years, and it's MUCH more complicated than most think...

The 'Resistor' in the altenator circuit 'Excite' wire is a stop-gap to get the engine to shut off when minimizing the wiring from ignition switch to engine bay.

Running everything off one ignition circuit in the switch (Gauges, ignition, alternator, ect.) if anything in ANY of that wiring goes wrong, your ignition might not work.... Or work correctly.

A Diode is a VERY simple way to replace that 'Iffy' and trouble prone resistor wire.
(Corrodes badly, rots terminals, breaks easily with vibration since it's a solid core, ect.)

The diode cost next to nothing, eats nothing, and works well without ANY back-feeding into the ignition system,
Doesn't heat up like the resistor wire does,
Doesn't break with vibration since it's connected to flexible strand wire on both ends, ect.

The fuse in the system is there because several generations of vehicles burned to the ground.
A solution had to be found, and a fuse was a good way to protect the wire to the generator/alternator.

When hooked to... Or very close to, the battery, they had explosions...
The way to avoid that was to move the fuse away from the battery, so it wound up at the starter relay/positive battery cable so it still had a direct, large gauge cable connection to the battery positive.

Now, battery doesn't blow up and vehicle doesn't burn down.

Fusible Links blow much 'Slower' than regular fuses, so it allows the alternator to put out a BUNCH of current without popping a regular fuse,
But it still protects the heavy wire against a 'Dead Short'...

You CAN blow the fusible link by grounding a wrench out when taking the wire off the back of the alternator!
Some people have a 'Bad' alternator, go to change it, can't figure out why the 'New' alternator won't charge...
Mostly because they grounded out the 'BAT' terminal on the back when removing the alternator and created another 'Issue' by blowing the fusible link.

What I usually do is...
Use a battery 'Load' tester on the 'BAT' terminal of the alternator and 'Load' the fusible link.
If it puts good current through to the tester, then the fusible link/alternator heavy wire is working correctly,
And the 'Issue' is elsewhere...

I don't know how many 'Cooked' alternators I've seen in over 30 years of doing this because the alternator couldn't get a solid 'Ground'...

If you are going to produce a bunch of current (Some alternators will produce 140 amps all day long!), then you MUST have a good 'Ground' connection back to the battery.
Rust in bolts/bolt holes, loose bolts, painted brackets, rusted brackets, Rusted bolts on 'Ground' cables, corroded or loose 'Ground' cables, corroded battery terminals or cables will ALL Kill and alternator,
And all that resitance adds up in the system to REDUCE the current your alternator produces, but can't get through to the battery/vehicle loads.

(Load = Short for 'ELECTRICAL LOAD', Anything that uses electricity on your vehicle.
The starter being the largest FACTORY load,
An electric Winch being the largest added electrical 'Load' usually.)

If you want the charging system to work 'Correctly',
You need a DEDICATED 'Ground' wire to the alternator at least as large as the 'Positive' or 'BAT' terminal wire.
In most cases, that's 10 Ga. or larger.

-----------------------------------------------------

Now,
'Ga.' refers to 'American Wire Gauge' or just 'Wire Gauge'.
'Ga. is an abbrivation of the word 'Gage' or 'Gauge', either spelling is acceptable.

The American Wire Gaged standard is based DIRECTLY off the Brown & Sharp scale from 130 Years ago, and I've listed the original Brown & Sharp tables below.

Wire gauges are kind of strange,
The LARGER the number, the SMALLER the wire! Dead backwards of what people think it is!

A 16 Ga. wire is smaller than a 10 Ga. wire.

And when you get up in SIZE (Smaller Numbers) to about 6 Ga. we call them 'Cables' instead of 'Wires'.
( your battery 'CABLE' is probably a 6 Ga. or 4 Ga. 'Wire', but we call them 'Cables' after about 8 Ga.)

Now, as the wire size increases, it can be a '0' (Zero) gauge,
When they get larger, we call them 2/0 ('00', Pronounced 'Two Ought') and even larger would be a 4/0 ('0000') Gauge...
This FURTHER confuses things!

This is a copy of the 'Brown & Sharp' scale, and it tells you more information about wire sizes than you probably ever want to know!



The SMALLER the number, the LARGER the wire and the more amperage it will carry.
This also tells you resistance per foot (long runs of DC wiring reduce the current delivered, so you UP size the wiring on long runs).

Direct Current (DC) is VERY hard to push through wires very far,
Works GREAT for automotive purposes, which is why we are still using it 150 years after the first car makers started using it,
But it can be confusing until you get a grip on the terms and quirks of how it's measured/gaged, transfered from battery to 'Load' and produced in the generator and transfered to the battery.

Now, REMEMBER!
This table is for CONTINUOUS USE,
When it says that a 10 Ga. wire will only handle 32.5 Amps (like the wire between your alternator to your battery),
That means you can run 32.5 AMPS CONTINUOUSLY through that wire without it heating up.

You can force MUCH MORE amperage through that 10 Ga. wire for a short period (Which your alternator does quite often), but the wire WILL heat up because of internal resistance in the wire.
The more you try and force through it, the faster the wire will heat up, and the higher that heat will go with higher amperages...

SO!
Most guys with 80 Amp alternators and a 10 Ga. wire have the delivery wire SERIOUSLY undersized if they think the alternator cranks 80 amps all the time!

This resistance/heat up of the wire is why you use a MUCH larger wire for the starter than you do for some little relay,
And why you use even LARGER cables for a winch than you do a starter, because a winch usually pulls harder/longer than a starter does...

Welding usually only has to handle between 40 and 100 amps,
And starters usually pull between 75 and 300 amps,
Where your winch will often pull 700 Amps or more!

Welding takes SMALLER gauge wire to do 'Correctly' than a starter,
And a winch will take MUCH larger cables to supply the electric motor correctly since it's loaded even harder than welding!

(People don't realize you can weld off of two batteries pretty easily, even through they are trying to pull 700 AMPS through 6 Ga. or 4 Ga. wires on a winch!
Does't make sense to me, but I see it all the time, winches with 6 Ga or 4 Ga. wire,
And 0 Ga. or 2/0 Ga. welding cables!)

Some of the newer vehicles have reduced load starters, so they only have a 10 Ga. or 8 Ga. wire feeding them...
Try that with a Jeep, and you will be changing a LOT of starters since you aren't delivering enough current to the starter and burning them up!

ALWAYS BETTER TO GO A WIRE SIZE OR TWO UP AND DELIVER A GOOD SOLID SUPPLY TO THE LOADS,
Than to be popping fuses, staring fires, melting insulation, ect.

AND REMEMBER!
*IF*...
You supply your 'Loads' with larger gauge 'POSITIVE' supply,
You MUST add a reasonable size 'Ground' or 'NEGATIVE' return wire to the battery for the 'Load' to function correctly!

THE CIRCUIT MUST CLOSE BACK TO THE BATTERY!
If it doesn't 'Close', then it's not a 'Circuit', it's an 'Open' and your stuff won't work correctly!


Hope this helps.

Last edited by JeepHammer; 07-19-2010 at 09:54 AM..
JeepHammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 08-04-2010, 09:20 PM   #11
wingedmare
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 29 palms ca, california
Posts: 269
Well, I finaly had to admit defeat and I took her into the shop today. But this has given me a GREAT education and even though I have better understanding I'm still in over my head. My mechanic laughed when I gave him the run down of all I've done so far and said "Well, you did all the prep work for us...". I'm sure I'll be hanging my head in shame in a few days when they get back to me with what it is, but it's better than creating a bigger problem.

TNX again for the GREAT info, it is all printed up and in my Jeep Repair Folder!
wingedmare is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 08-05-2010, 07:18 AM   #12
Cutlass327
Web Wheeler
 
Cutlass327's Avatar
1978 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Beach City, Ohio
Posts: 5,116
One thing most people also overlook - on some sytems (not sure if ours are this way) if the light bulb in the dash blows, or if the dash fuse that powers that bulb blows, then there is no power to the excite wire to the alternator. I know in JH's pic the wire comes from the coil (+) terminal, but this is deleting the dash light bulb out of the circuit I am talking about.. Maybe someone with a diagram for your year can check this out and correct me if I'm wrong.
__________________
Rick

1978 CJ5 258/T177/D300, '86 D30/D44 WT axles, 'glass tub windshield frame, and fenders, 31x10.5 BFG A/T, TDK galv'd frame - DD and weekend toy

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/ri...8-cj5-1223197/
Cutlass327 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 08-05-2010, 07:43 AM   #13
JeepHammer
Running On Empty...
1973 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: South West Indiana
Posts: 10,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cutlass327 View Post
One thing most people also overlook - on some sytems (not sure if ours are this way) if the light bulb in the dash blows, or if the dash fuse that powers that bulb blows, then there is no power to the excite wire to the alternator. I know in JH's pic the wire comes from the coil (+) terminal, but this is deleting the dash light bulb out of the circuit I am talking about.. Maybe someone with a diagram for your year can check this out and correct me if I'm wrong.
You are assuming there is an 'Amps' light on the dash, which there isn't with the Delco alternator Jeeps.

CJ's deleted the 'Amps' light in favor of a resistor wire at the 'Excite' terminal in '75 and hasn't looked back.
The resistor wire does the same job as the bulb, and doesn't burn out,
Some think it's an 'Upgrade', but I prefer the 'Idiot Light' to show me there is something wrong when I'm not watching the gauges.
JeepHammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 08-05-2010, 08:38 AM   #14
Dustlander
Registered User
1979 CJ7 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Willamsburg, Virginia
Posts: 115
ok i have a question on my #1 wire off the alternator goes into a really thin solid black wire that goes back to the fuse block, if needed i can take pics, is this the light your talking about? i have a 79 cj7
Dustlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 08-05-2010, 10:00 AM   #15
wingedmare
Registered User
1981 CJ5 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: 29 palms ca, california
Posts: 269
I took her into the shop yesterday (a CJ Junkie works there) and got a call back this morning. It was a fusable link that fryed, but from his description of where it was tucked away would explain why I couldn't find the problem. I couldn't see into that area to find it LET ALONE check it. Apparently a good chunk of wire is exposed there too. So he is going to replace the wiring from the Alternator to the battery and give me a guided tour of what was where and how its supposed to be when I go pick her up this afternoon. I'm glad I decided to take her in, now she will be done properly and I can be taught for next time.
wingedmare is offline   Reply With Quote




Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.